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Lower Back Symptoms in Adolescent Soccer Players: Predictors of Functional Recovery.

Shah T, Cloke DJ, Rushton S, Shirley MD, Deehan DJ - Orthop J Sports Med (2014)

Bottom Line: There are little published data on factors relating to low back pain in the younger athletic population.Overall, 10,265 training days (median, 14 days; interquartile range, 8-30 days) were lost.It is suggested that there should be a low threshold for investigation of adolescent patients with back pain in the hope of early appropriate management of more severe diagnoses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.

ABSTRACT

Background: There are little published data on factors relating to low back pain in the younger athletic population.

Hypothesis: Independent predictors of recovery and return to participation in sports could be determined by event analysis, which investigates the impacts of covariates, including age, position, and injury type, on the risk of delayed recovery after injury.

Study design: Descriptive epidemiology study.

Methods: This study examined 41 English Premiership soccer academy squads consisting of 12,306 player seasons for the incidence of lower back injury, injury severity, and investigated time to recovery in relation to potential risk factors. Injury risk was assessed for different times in a match and season, mechanism of injury, player position, player age, and competitive compared with noncompetitive play.

Results: A total of 310 (3.0% of all injuries sustained in the population) lumbar spine injuries were recorded. Overall, 10,265 training days (median, 14 days; interquartile range, 8-30 days) were lost. The risk of injury increased as the first half progressed and was maintained throughout the second half with a contact mechanism and with increasing age. Neither competitive play compared with noncompetitive play nor player position had an effect on injury incidence. Prognostic factors for poor recovery were bony injuries and increasing age.

Conclusion: These findings indicate that prolonged absence from training after a back injury is seen, especially in bony injuries and in older adolescents. It is suggested that there should be a low threshold for investigation of adolescent patients with back pain in the hope of early appropriate management of more severe diagnoses.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Survival curves representing the probability of not returning to sport as time from injury increases for all combinations of significant covariates at injury age 16 years. Dashed line, 95% confidence intervals.
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fig4-2325967114529703: Survival curves representing the probability of not returning to sport as time from injury increases for all combinations of significant covariates at injury age 16 years. Dashed line, 95% confidence intervals.

Mentions: The return to sport following injury was modeled as an event, and survival curves describing the probability of returning to sport with time were produced. Cox proportional hazards were used to identify those risk factors or covariates that influenced the probability of returning to sport. As expected, risk of not returning to sport was very high immediately after the injury but decreased as healing progressed (Figures 3 and 4). Nature of injury was a significant risk factor influencing time to recovery, with fractures and bony tissue injuries both found to have a lower risk of recovery (reduction of 76% and 44%, respectively) and hence, an extended time to recovery compared with soft tissue injuries (Table 6). Risk of recovery was dependent on the age at which the injury occurred, with each year of age reducing the risk of recovery by 13%, indicating that older players took longer times to recover. These risks are illustrated in Figures 3 and 4, which present predicted survival curves (ie, probability of returning to sport with time) for each type of injury in a 12-year-old and 16-year-old. Inclusion of year as a covariate was nonsignificant (P = .32), indicating that there was no significant trend in improvement of recovery since the beginning of the study. There was no violation of the assumption that hazards were proportional with time.


Lower Back Symptoms in Adolescent Soccer Players: Predictors of Functional Recovery.

Shah T, Cloke DJ, Rushton S, Shirley MD, Deehan DJ - Orthop J Sports Med (2014)

Survival curves representing the probability of not returning to sport as time from injury increases for all combinations of significant covariates at injury age 16 years. Dashed line, 95% confidence intervals.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555597&req=5

fig4-2325967114529703: Survival curves representing the probability of not returning to sport as time from injury increases for all combinations of significant covariates at injury age 16 years. Dashed line, 95% confidence intervals.
Mentions: The return to sport following injury was modeled as an event, and survival curves describing the probability of returning to sport with time were produced. Cox proportional hazards were used to identify those risk factors or covariates that influenced the probability of returning to sport. As expected, risk of not returning to sport was very high immediately after the injury but decreased as healing progressed (Figures 3 and 4). Nature of injury was a significant risk factor influencing time to recovery, with fractures and bony tissue injuries both found to have a lower risk of recovery (reduction of 76% and 44%, respectively) and hence, an extended time to recovery compared with soft tissue injuries (Table 6). Risk of recovery was dependent on the age at which the injury occurred, with each year of age reducing the risk of recovery by 13%, indicating that older players took longer times to recover. These risks are illustrated in Figures 3 and 4, which present predicted survival curves (ie, probability of returning to sport with time) for each type of injury in a 12-year-old and 16-year-old. Inclusion of year as a covariate was nonsignificant (P = .32), indicating that there was no significant trend in improvement of recovery since the beginning of the study. There was no violation of the assumption that hazards were proportional with time.

Bottom Line: There are little published data on factors relating to low back pain in the younger athletic population.Overall, 10,265 training days (median, 14 days; interquartile range, 8-30 days) were lost.It is suggested that there should be a low threshold for investigation of adolescent patients with back pain in the hope of early appropriate management of more severe diagnoses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.

ABSTRACT

Background: There are little published data on factors relating to low back pain in the younger athletic population.

Hypothesis: Independent predictors of recovery and return to participation in sports could be determined by event analysis, which investigates the impacts of covariates, including age, position, and injury type, on the risk of delayed recovery after injury.

Study design: Descriptive epidemiology study.

Methods: This study examined 41 English Premiership soccer academy squads consisting of 12,306 player seasons for the incidence of lower back injury, injury severity, and investigated time to recovery in relation to potential risk factors. Injury risk was assessed for different times in a match and season, mechanism of injury, player position, player age, and competitive compared with noncompetitive play.

Results: A total of 310 (3.0% of all injuries sustained in the population) lumbar spine injuries were recorded. Overall, 10,265 training days (median, 14 days; interquartile range, 8-30 days) were lost. The risk of injury increased as the first half progressed and was maintained throughout the second half with a contact mechanism and with increasing age. Neither competitive play compared with noncompetitive play nor player position had an effect on injury incidence. Prognostic factors for poor recovery were bony injuries and increasing age.

Conclusion: These findings indicate that prolonged absence from training after a back injury is seen, especially in bony injuries and in older adolescents. It is suggested that there should be a low threshold for investigation of adolescent patients with back pain in the hope of early appropriate management of more severe diagnoses.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus