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Enlargement of Glenoid Defects in Traumatic Anterior Shoulder Instability: Influence of the Number of Recurrences and Type of Sport.

Nakagawa S, Ozaki R, Take Y, Mizuno N, Mae T - Orthop J Sports Med (2014)

Bottom Line: Glenoid rim morphology was compared between primary and recurrent instability.In addition, glenoid defects were compared among 49 male American football players, 41 male rugby players, 27 male baseball players, and 25 female athletes.Glenoid defect size is also influenced by sex and by the type of sport.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, Yukioka Hospital, Osaka, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Large glenoid rim defects in patients with traumatic anterior shoulder instability are often regarded as a contraindication for arthroscopic Bankart repair, with a defect of 20% to 27% considered as the critical size. While recurrence of dislocations, male sex, and collision sports were reported to be the significant factors influencing large glenoid defects, the influences of subluxations and more detailed types of sports were not investigated.

Purpose: To investigate the influence of the number of dislocations and subluxations and type of sport on the occurrence and size of glenoid defects in detail.

Study design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3.

Methods: A total of 223 shoulders (60 with primary instability, 163 with recurrent instability) were prospectively examined by computed tomography. Glenoid rim morphology was compared between primary and recurrent instability. In patients with recurrent instability, the relationship between the glenoid defect and the number of dislocations and subluxations was investigated. In addition, glenoid defects were compared among 49 male American football players, 41 male rugby players, 27 male baseball players, and 25 female athletes.

Results: The mean extent of the glenoid defect was 3.5% in shoulders with primary instability and 11.3% in those with recurrent instability. A glenoid defect was detected in 108 shoulders (66.2%) with recurrent instability versus 12 shoulders (20%) with primary instability. Regarding the influence of the total number of dislocations/subluxations, the average extent of the glenoid defect was 6.3% in 85 shoulders with 2 to 5 events, 12.9% in 34 shoulders with 6 to 10 events, and 19.6% in 44 shoulders with 11 or more events. The glenoid defect became significantly larger along with an increasing number of recurrences. Although recurrent subluxation without dislocation also influenced the glenoid defect size, the number of dislocations did not. The average extent of the glenoid defect was 12.0% in rugby players, 8.9% in American football players, 4.7% in female athletes, and 4.5% in baseball players. Glenoid defects were significantly smaller in male baseball players and female athletes than in male collision athletes.

Conclusion: The glenoid defect is significantly enlarged by damage due to recurrent dislocation and subluxation; therefore, glenoid rim morphology differs markedly between primary and recurrent instability. Glenoid defect size is also influenced by sex and by the type of sport.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Glenoid defect versus sex and type of sport.
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fig4-2325967114529920: Glenoid defect versus sex and type of sport.

Mentions: Regarding the influence of sex and the type of sport, the average extent of the glenoid defect was 12.0% in male rugby players, 8.9% in male American football players, 4.7% in female athletes, and 4.5% in male baseball players (Figure 4). In rugby players and American football players, the defect was significantly larger than in female athletes and baseball players (P = .002), while baseball players were similar to female athletes. The frequency of a large glenoid defect (>20%) was 22% (n = 9 shoulders) in rugby players, 16% (n = 8 shoulders) in American football players, 7% (n= 2 shoulders) in baseball players, and 4% (n = 1 shoulder) in female athletes. Although more frequent in collision athletes, there was no significant difference. On the other hand, there was no glenoid defect in 70% (n = 19 shoulders) of baseball players, 68% (n = 17 shoulders) of female athletes, 45% (n = 27 shoulders) of American football players, and 27% (n = 11 shoulders) of rugby players. The frequency of no glenoid defect was significantly higher in baseball players and female athletes than in American football and rugby players. Among female athletes, as the average extent of the glenoid defect was 6.8% in collision sports, 2.2% in contact sports, 5.0% in overhead sports, and 6.2% in the other sports, there were no statistically differences regarding the type of sport.


Enlargement of Glenoid Defects in Traumatic Anterior Shoulder Instability: Influence of the Number of Recurrences and Type of Sport.

Nakagawa S, Ozaki R, Take Y, Mizuno N, Mae T - Orthop J Sports Med (2014)

Glenoid defect versus sex and type of sport.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555596&req=5

fig4-2325967114529920: Glenoid defect versus sex and type of sport.
Mentions: Regarding the influence of sex and the type of sport, the average extent of the glenoid defect was 12.0% in male rugby players, 8.9% in male American football players, 4.7% in female athletes, and 4.5% in male baseball players (Figure 4). In rugby players and American football players, the defect was significantly larger than in female athletes and baseball players (P = .002), while baseball players were similar to female athletes. The frequency of a large glenoid defect (>20%) was 22% (n = 9 shoulders) in rugby players, 16% (n = 8 shoulders) in American football players, 7% (n= 2 shoulders) in baseball players, and 4% (n = 1 shoulder) in female athletes. Although more frequent in collision athletes, there was no significant difference. On the other hand, there was no glenoid defect in 70% (n = 19 shoulders) of baseball players, 68% (n = 17 shoulders) of female athletes, 45% (n = 27 shoulders) of American football players, and 27% (n = 11 shoulders) of rugby players. The frequency of no glenoid defect was significantly higher in baseball players and female athletes than in American football and rugby players. Among female athletes, as the average extent of the glenoid defect was 6.8% in collision sports, 2.2% in contact sports, 5.0% in overhead sports, and 6.2% in the other sports, there were no statistically differences regarding the type of sport.

Bottom Line: Glenoid rim morphology was compared between primary and recurrent instability.In addition, glenoid defects were compared among 49 male American football players, 41 male rugby players, 27 male baseball players, and 25 female athletes.Glenoid defect size is also influenced by sex and by the type of sport.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, Yukioka Hospital, Osaka, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Large glenoid rim defects in patients with traumatic anterior shoulder instability are often regarded as a contraindication for arthroscopic Bankart repair, with a defect of 20% to 27% considered as the critical size. While recurrence of dislocations, male sex, and collision sports were reported to be the significant factors influencing large glenoid defects, the influences of subluxations and more detailed types of sports were not investigated.

Purpose: To investigate the influence of the number of dislocations and subluxations and type of sport on the occurrence and size of glenoid defects in detail.

Study design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3.

Methods: A total of 223 shoulders (60 with primary instability, 163 with recurrent instability) were prospectively examined by computed tomography. Glenoid rim morphology was compared between primary and recurrent instability. In patients with recurrent instability, the relationship between the glenoid defect and the number of dislocations and subluxations was investigated. In addition, glenoid defects were compared among 49 male American football players, 41 male rugby players, 27 male baseball players, and 25 female athletes.

Results: The mean extent of the glenoid defect was 3.5% in shoulders with primary instability and 11.3% in those with recurrent instability. A glenoid defect was detected in 108 shoulders (66.2%) with recurrent instability versus 12 shoulders (20%) with primary instability. Regarding the influence of the total number of dislocations/subluxations, the average extent of the glenoid defect was 6.3% in 85 shoulders with 2 to 5 events, 12.9% in 34 shoulders with 6 to 10 events, and 19.6% in 44 shoulders with 11 or more events. The glenoid defect became significantly larger along with an increasing number of recurrences. Although recurrent subluxation without dislocation also influenced the glenoid defect size, the number of dislocations did not. The average extent of the glenoid defect was 12.0% in rugby players, 8.9% in American football players, 4.7% in female athletes, and 4.5% in baseball players. Glenoid defects were significantly smaller in male baseball players and female athletes than in male collision athletes.

Conclusion: The glenoid defect is significantly enlarged by damage due to recurrent dislocation and subluxation; therefore, glenoid rim morphology differs markedly between primary and recurrent instability. Glenoid defect size is also influenced by sex and by the type of sport.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus