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High Prevalence of Disc Degeneration and Spondylolysis in the Lumbar Spine of Professional Beach Volleyball Players.

Külling FA, Florianz H, Reepschläger B, Gasser J, Jost B, Lajtai G - Orthop J Sports Med (2014)

Bottom Line: There was no significant correlation between LBP and MRI abnormalities.In the lumbar spine MRI of professional beach volleyball players, the prevalence of disc degeneration is 79%.Spondylolysis (21%) is up to 3 times higher compared with the normal population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Kantonsspital St Gallen, St Gallen, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT

Background: Beach volleyball is an intensive sport with high impact on the lumbar spine. Low back pain (LBP) is frequent among elite players. Increased prevalence of pathological changes on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the lumbar spine of elite athletes has been reported.

Hypothesis: There is an increased prevalence of disc degeneration and spondylolysis in the MRI of the lumbar spine of professional beach volleyball players.

Study design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3.

Methods: Twenty-nine fully competitive professional male volleyball players (mean age, 28 years) completed outcomes questionnaires and underwent a complete clinical examination and an MRI of their lumbar spine.

Results: Whereas 86% of players suffered from LBP during their career, the incidence of LBP in the last 4 weeks was 35%. Pain rated using a visual analog scale (VAS) averaged 3 points (range, 0-8). Twenty-three of 29 players (79%) had at least 1 degenerated disc of Pfirrmann grade ≥3. The most affected spinal levels were L4-5 in 14 (48%) and L5-S1 in 15 players (52%); both levels were involved in 5 players (17%). Six of 29 (21%) players showed a spondylolysis grade 4 according to the Hollenburg classification; there was evidence of spondylolisthesis in 2 players. There was no significant correlation between LBP and MRI abnormalities.

Conclusion: In the lumbar spine MRI of professional beach volleyball players, the prevalence of disc degeneration is 79%. Spondylolysis (21%) is up to 3 times higher compared with the normal population. Abnormal MRI findings did not correlate with LBP, thus MRIs have to be interpreted with caution.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Sagittal T2-weighted MRI scan showing Pfirrmann grade 4 at levels L5-S1 and grade 3 at levels L3-4 and L4-5. Additionally, there is spondylolisthesis Meyerding grade 1 between L5 and S1.
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fig2-2325967114528862: Sagittal T2-weighted MRI scan showing Pfirrmann grade 4 at levels L5-S1 and grade 3 at levels L3-4 and L4-5. Additionally, there is spondylolisthesis Meyerding grade 1 between L5 and S1.

Mentions: In addition, the MRIs were specifically evaluated for spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis (Figure 2). MRI is reliable in detecting abnormalities of the pars interarticularis.7 Stress reactions of the pars interarticularis were classified according to Hollenberg et al.22 Grade 0 is normal without signal abnormalities. Grade 1 shows stress-related marrow edema but no spondylolysis. Grade 2 shows T2-signal abnormalities and thinning, fragmentation, or irregularity of the portion. Grade 3 involves a complete unilateral or bilateral lysis, and in grade 4, there is a complete spondylolysis without T2 abnormalities. The amount of slip was classified according to Meyerding.30


High Prevalence of Disc Degeneration and Spondylolysis in the Lumbar Spine of Professional Beach Volleyball Players.

Külling FA, Florianz H, Reepschläger B, Gasser J, Jost B, Lajtai G - Orthop J Sports Med (2014)

Sagittal T2-weighted MRI scan showing Pfirrmann grade 4 at levels L5-S1 and grade 3 at levels L3-4 and L4-5. Additionally, there is spondylolisthesis Meyerding grade 1 between L5 and S1.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555589&req=5

fig2-2325967114528862: Sagittal T2-weighted MRI scan showing Pfirrmann grade 4 at levels L5-S1 and grade 3 at levels L3-4 and L4-5. Additionally, there is spondylolisthesis Meyerding grade 1 between L5 and S1.
Mentions: In addition, the MRIs were specifically evaluated for spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis (Figure 2). MRI is reliable in detecting abnormalities of the pars interarticularis.7 Stress reactions of the pars interarticularis were classified according to Hollenberg et al.22 Grade 0 is normal without signal abnormalities. Grade 1 shows stress-related marrow edema but no spondylolysis. Grade 2 shows T2-signal abnormalities and thinning, fragmentation, or irregularity of the portion. Grade 3 involves a complete unilateral or bilateral lysis, and in grade 4, there is a complete spondylolysis without T2 abnormalities. The amount of slip was classified according to Meyerding.30

Bottom Line: There was no significant correlation between LBP and MRI abnormalities.In the lumbar spine MRI of professional beach volleyball players, the prevalence of disc degeneration is 79%.Spondylolysis (21%) is up to 3 times higher compared with the normal population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Kantonsspital St Gallen, St Gallen, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT

Background: Beach volleyball is an intensive sport with high impact on the lumbar spine. Low back pain (LBP) is frequent among elite players. Increased prevalence of pathological changes on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the lumbar spine of elite athletes has been reported.

Hypothesis: There is an increased prevalence of disc degeneration and spondylolysis in the MRI of the lumbar spine of professional beach volleyball players.

Study design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3.

Methods: Twenty-nine fully competitive professional male volleyball players (mean age, 28 years) completed outcomes questionnaires and underwent a complete clinical examination and an MRI of their lumbar spine.

Results: Whereas 86% of players suffered from LBP during their career, the incidence of LBP in the last 4 weeks was 35%. Pain rated using a visual analog scale (VAS) averaged 3 points (range, 0-8). Twenty-three of 29 players (79%) had at least 1 degenerated disc of Pfirrmann grade ≥3. The most affected spinal levels were L4-5 in 14 (48%) and L5-S1 in 15 players (52%); both levels were involved in 5 players (17%). Six of 29 (21%) players showed a spondylolysis grade 4 according to the Hollenburg classification; there was evidence of spondylolisthesis in 2 players. There was no significant correlation between LBP and MRI abnormalities.

Conclusion: In the lumbar spine MRI of professional beach volleyball players, the prevalence of disc degeneration is 79%. Spondylolysis (21%) is up to 3 times higher compared with the normal population. Abnormal MRI findings did not correlate with LBP, thus MRIs have to be interpreted with caution.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus