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The Current State of Head and Neck Injuries in Extreme Sports.

Sharma VK, Rango J, Connaughton AJ, Lombardo DJ, Sabesan VJ - Orthop J Sports Med (2015)

Bottom Line: The recent death of extreme snowmobiler Caleb Moore at the 2013 Winter X Games has demonstrated the serious risks associated with these sports.The number of serious injuries suffered in extreme sports has increased as participation in the sports continues to grow.A greater awareness of the dangers associated with these sports offers an opportunity for sports medicine and orthopaedic physicians to advocate for safer equipment, improved on-site medical care, and further research regarding extreme sports injuries.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Homer Stryker MD School of Medicine, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Since their conception during the mid-1970s, international participation in extreme sports has grown rapidly. The recent death of extreme snowmobiler Caleb Moore at the 2013 Winter X Games has demonstrated the serious risks associated with these sports.

Purpose: To examine the incidence and prevalence of head and neck injuries (HNIs) in extreme sports.

Study design: Descriptive epidemiological study.

Methods: The National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) was used to acquire data from 7 sports (2000-2011) that were included in the Winter and Summer X Games. Data from the NEISS database were collected for each individual sport per year and type of HNI. Cumulative data for overall incidence and injuries over the entire 11-year period were calculated. National estimates were determined using NEISS-weighted calculations. Incidence rates were calculated for extreme sports using data from Outdoor Foundation Participation Reports.

Results: Over 4 million injuries were reported between 2000 and 2011, of which 11.3% were HNIs. Of all HNIs, 83% were head injuries and 17% neck injuries. The 4 sports with the highest total incidence of HNI were skateboarding (129,600), snowboarding (97,527), skiing (83,313), and motocross (78,236). Severe HNI (cervical or skull fracture) accounted for 2.5% of extreme sports HNIs. Of these, skateboarding had the highest percentage of severe HNIs.

Conclusion: The number of serious injuries suffered in extreme sports has increased as participation in the sports continues to grow. A greater awareness of the dangers associated with these sports offers an opportunity for sports medicine and orthopaedic physicians to advocate for safer equipment, improved on-site medical care, and further research regarding extreme sports injuries.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Distribution of severe injuries and concussions in individual extreme sports. (A) Occurrence of concussions and (B) occurrence of severe injuries.
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fig3-2325967114564358: Distribution of severe injuries and concussions in individual extreme sports. (A) Occurrence of concussions and (B) occurrence of severe injuries.

Mentions: There was a wide range of injury rates for HNI between individual extreme sports (Figure 2). The 4 sports with the highest total number of reported HNIs during the 12-year period were skateboarding (129,600), snowboarding (97,527), skiing (83,313), and motocross (78,236) (Table 1). The sports with the lowest reported number of HNIs were mountain biking (15,233), snowmobiling (16,448), and surfing (39,758). There were 140,650 concussions (31% of HNIs, 3.4% of all injuries) reported over the 12-year period for extreme sports. Snowboarding had the most concussions (42,811), accounting for 30% of all reported concussions, while snow skiing had the second most occurrences (34,897), accounting for 25% of all reported concussions (Figure 3). Snowmobiling and surfing had the fewest reported concussions (2.9% [4054] and 2.3% [3242], respectively).


The Current State of Head and Neck Injuries in Extreme Sports.

Sharma VK, Rango J, Connaughton AJ, Lombardo DJ, Sabesan VJ - Orthop J Sports Med (2015)

Distribution of severe injuries and concussions in individual extreme sports. (A) Occurrence of concussions and (B) occurrence of severe injuries.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555583&req=5

fig3-2325967114564358: Distribution of severe injuries and concussions in individual extreme sports. (A) Occurrence of concussions and (B) occurrence of severe injuries.
Mentions: There was a wide range of injury rates for HNI between individual extreme sports (Figure 2). The 4 sports with the highest total number of reported HNIs during the 12-year period were skateboarding (129,600), snowboarding (97,527), skiing (83,313), and motocross (78,236) (Table 1). The sports with the lowest reported number of HNIs were mountain biking (15,233), snowmobiling (16,448), and surfing (39,758). There were 140,650 concussions (31% of HNIs, 3.4% of all injuries) reported over the 12-year period for extreme sports. Snowboarding had the most concussions (42,811), accounting for 30% of all reported concussions, while snow skiing had the second most occurrences (34,897), accounting for 25% of all reported concussions (Figure 3). Snowmobiling and surfing had the fewest reported concussions (2.9% [4054] and 2.3% [3242], respectively).

Bottom Line: The recent death of extreme snowmobiler Caleb Moore at the 2013 Winter X Games has demonstrated the serious risks associated with these sports.The number of serious injuries suffered in extreme sports has increased as participation in the sports continues to grow.A greater awareness of the dangers associated with these sports offers an opportunity for sports medicine and orthopaedic physicians to advocate for safer equipment, improved on-site medical care, and further research regarding extreme sports injuries.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Homer Stryker MD School of Medicine, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Since their conception during the mid-1970s, international participation in extreme sports has grown rapidly. The recent death of extreme snowmobiler Caleb Moore at the 2013 Winter X Games has demonstrated the serious risks associated with these sports.

Purpose: To examine the incidence and prevalence of head and neck injuries (HNIs) in extreme sports.

Study design: Descriptive epidemiological study.

Methods: The National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) was used to acquire data from 7 sports (2000-2011) that were included in the Winter and Summer X Games. Data from the NEISS database were collected for each individual sport per year and type of HNI. Cumulative data for overall incidence and injuries over the entire 11-year period were calculated. National estimates were determined using NEISS-weighted calculations. Incidence rates were calculated for extreme sports using data from Outdoor Foundation Participation Reports.

Results: Over 4 million injuries were reported between 2000 and 2011, of which 11.3% were HNIs. Of all HNIs, 83% were head injuries and 17% neck injuries. The 4 sports with the highest total incidence of HNI were skateboarding (129,600), snowboarding (97,527), skiing (83,313), and motocross (78,236). Severe HNI (cervical or skull fracture) accounted for 2.5% of extreme sports HNIs. Of these, skateboarding had the highest percentage of severe HNIs.

Conclusion: The number of serious injuries suffered in extreme sports has increased as participation in the sports continues to grow. A greater awareness of the dangers associated with these sports offers an opportunity for sports medicine and orthopaedic physicians to advocate for safer equipment, improved on-site medical care, and further research regarding extreme sports injuries.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus