Limits...
Prevalence of Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Capitellum in Young Baseball Players: Results Based on Ultrasonographic Findings.

Matsuura T, Suzue N, Iwame T, Nishio S, Sairyo K - Orthop J Sports Med (2014)

Bottom Line: Radiographic and ultrasonographic findings were then compared.Of them, 22 (66.7%) were found to have OCD of the capitellum on radiographs, giving an overall prevalence of 2.1%.Analysis of OCD by age and player position revealed no significant differences.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopedics, Institute of Health Bioscience, University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the capitellum is a well-recognized cause of elbow pain and disability in adolescent athletes. However, little is known about the prevalence of OCD in adolescent baseball players.

Purpose: To determine the prevalence of OCD in baseball players aged 10 to 12 years based on ultrasonographic findings and to investigate the clinical characteristics of those with OCD lesions.

Study design: Descriptive epidemiology study.

Methods: A total of 1040 players aged 10 to 12 years completed a questionnaire, ultrasound imaging, and radiographic examination to investigate OCD. Sonographic findings were classified into 5 grades (0, 1a, 1b, 2, and 3). Subjects with grade 1a, 1b, 2, or 3 were considered to have abnormal findings of the capitellum and were advised to undergo radiography. Radiographic and ultrasonographic findings were then compared. The prevalence of OCD was calculated, and differences by age and player position were determined.

Results: Of the 1040 players, 33 (3.2%) had an abnormal finding on initial ultrasonography screening, and all 33 agreed to undergo radiography. Of them, 22 (66.7%) were found to have OCD of the capitellum on radiographs, giving an overall prevalence of 2.1%. Seven subjects (31.8%) had no history of elbow pain. Based on the radiographic classification, 20 subjects (90.9%) had stage I lesions. Analysis of OCD by age and player position revealed no significant differences.

Conclusion: The prevalence of OCD of the capitellum was 2.1% in 1000 baseball players aged 10 to 12 years, with no differences in prevalence according to age or player position.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Anteroposterior view on radiography with the elbow flexed at 45° during follow-up in a representative case of cystic lesion. The lesion decreased in size over time, and no osteochondritis dissecans was evident. (A) Initial examination and examinations at (B) 1 month, (C) 4 months, and (D) 6 months later.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555579&req=5

fig2-2325967114545298: Anteroposterior view on radiography with the elbow flexed at 45° during follow-up in a representative case of cystic lesion. The lesion decreased in size over time, and no osteochondritis dissecans was evident. (A) Initial examination and examinations at (B) 1 month, (C) 4 months, and (D) 6 months later.

Mentions: Of the 1040 players, 1007 (96.8%) had grade 0 (normal) findings in the throwing arm. Of them, 437 (43.4%) had history of elbow pain. Thirty-three (3.2%) had an abnormal finding on initial ultrasonography screening. Grade 1a was seen in 6 elbows (0.6%), grade 1b in 7 (0.7%), grade 2 in 11 (1.0%), and grade 3 in 9 (0.9%). A total of 1037 (99.7%) had grade 0 in the nonthrowing side. Only 3 players (0.3%) had a grade 1b lesion, and they had the same grade 1b lesion on the throwing side. All 33 subjects who had ultrasonographic abnormalities were male, and all agreed to undergo radiography. Of them, OCD of the capitellum was evident in 22 (66.7%) on the throwing side on radiography. Three subjects (9.1%) had a cystic lesion on both sides, and 8 (24.2%) had a normal appearance. Of the 11 players with cystic or normal appearance, 5 (45.5%) had experienced elbow pain in the throwing side. Table 1 shows the details of the ultrasonographic and radiographic findings in the throwing arm. The 3 cystic lesions were monitored by follow-up radiography, and in all 3 cases, the lesions decreased in size with no evidence of OCD (Figure 2). The 8 subjects with a normal appearance on the initial radiographic examination were monitored for 2 years, but none showed signs of OCD. The overall prevalence of OCD of the capitellum was 2.1%.


Prevalence of Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Capitellum in Young Baseball Players: Results Based on Ultrasonographic Findings.

Matsuura T, Suzue N, Iwame T, Nishio S, Sairyo K - Orthop J Sports Med (2014)

Anteroposterior view on radiography with the elbow flexed at 45° during follow-up in a representative case of cystic lesion. The lesion decreased in size over time, and no osteochondritis dissecans was evident. (A) Initial examination and examinations at (B) 1 month, (C) 4 months, and (D) 6 months later.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555579&req=5

fig2-2325967114545298: Anteroposterior view on radiography with the elbow flexed at 45° during follow-up in a representative case of cystic lesion. The lesion decreased in size over time, and no osteochondritis dissecans was evident. (A) Initial examination and examinations at (B) 1 month, (C) 4 months, and (D) 6 months later.
Mentions: Of the 1040 players, 1007 (96.8%) had grade 0 (normal) findings in the throwing arm. Of them, 437 (43.4%) had history of elbow pain. Thirty-three (3.2%) had an abnormal finding on initial ultrasonography screening. Grade 1a was seen in 6 elbows (0.6%), grade 1b in 7 (0.7%), grade 2 in 11 (1.0%), and grade 3 in 9 (0.9%). A total of 1037 (99.7%) had grade 0 in the nonthrowing side. Only 3 players (0.3%) had a grade 1b lesion, and they had the same grade 1b lesion on the throwing side. All 33 subjects who had ultrasonographic abnormalities were male, and all agreed to undergo radiography. Of them, OCD of the capitellum was evident in 22 (66.7%) on the throwing side on radiography. Three subjects (9.1%) had a cystic lesion on both sides, and 8 (24.2%) had a normal appearance. Of the 11 players with cystic or normal appearance, 5 (45.5%) had experienced elbow pain in the throwing side. Table 1 shows the details of the ultrasonographic and radiographic findings in the throwing arm. The 3 cystic lesions were monitored by follow-up radiography, and in all 3 cases, the lesions decreased in size with no evidence of OCD (Figure 2). The 8 subjects with a normal appearance on the initial radiographic examination were monitored for 2 years, but none showed signs of OCD. The overall prevalence of OCD of the capitellum was 2.1%.

Bottom Line: Radiographic and ultrasonographic findings were then compared.Of them, 22 (66.7%) were found to have OCD of the capitellum on radiographs, giving an overall prevalence of 2.1%.Analysis of OCD by age and player position revealed no significant differences.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopedics, Institute of Health Bioscience, University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the capitellum is a well-recognized cause of elbow pain and disability in adolescent athletes. However, little is known about the prevalence of OCD in adolescent baseball players.

Purpose: To determine the prevalence of OCD in baseball players aged 10 to 12 years based on ultrasonographic findings and to investigate the clinical characteristics of those with OCD lesions.

Study design: Descriptive epidemiology study.

Methods: A total of 1040 players aged 10 to 12 years completed a questionnaire, ultrasound imaging, and radiographic examination to investigate OCD. Sonographic findings were classified into 5 grades (0, 1a, 1b, 2, and 3). Subjects with grade 1a, 1b, 2, or 3 were considered to have abnormal findings of the capitellum and were advised to undergo radiography. Radiographic and ultrasonographic findings were then compared. The prevalence of OCD was calculated, and differences by age and player position were determined.

Results: Of the 1040 players, 33 (3.2%) had an abnormal finding on initial ultrasonography screening, and all 33 agreed to undergo radiography. Of them, 22 (66.7%) were found to have OCD of the capitellum on radiographs, giving an overall prevalence of 2.1%. Seven subjects (31.8%) had no history of elbow pain. Based on the radiographic classification, 20 subjects (90.9%) had stage I lesions. Analysis of OCD by age and player position revealed no significant differences.

Conclusion: The prevalence of OCD of the capitellum was 2.1% in 1000 baseball players aged 10 to 12 years, with no differences in prevalence according to age or player position.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus