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Delay to Reconstruction of the Adolescent Anterior Cruciate Ligament: The Socioeconomic Impact on Treatment.

Newman JT, Carry PM, Terhune EB, Spruiell M, Heare A, Mayo M, Vidal AF - Orthop J Sports Med (2014)

Bottom Line: Median time to ACL surgery was 1.5 months (95% CI, 1.3-1.7) for subjects with commercial insurance plans compared with 3.0 months (95% CI, 2.3-3.3) for subjects with noncommercial insurance coverage.The risk of delayed ACL surgery was significantly higher among pediatric and adolescent subjects who were less affluent, who were covered by a noncommercial insurance plan, and who were younger.The orthopaedic surgeon should be aware of the association between socioeconomic and demographic factors and ACL surgery timing to optimize outcomes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: A delay in pediatric and adolescent anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is associated with an increase in the number of concomitant meniscal and chondral injuries. Factors that contribute to this delay have not been well described.

Hypothesis: Socioeconomic and demographic factors are related to ACL surgery timing.

Study methods: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3.

Methods: All subjects who underwent primary ACL reconstruction at a single tertiary pediatric hospital between 2005 and 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Variables included concomitant knee injuries (cartilage or meniscus injuries requiring additional operative treatment) and chronologic, demographic, and socioeconomic factors. Multivariable Cox proportional-hazards analyses were used to identify factors related to ACL surgery timing.

Results: The mean age of the 272 subjects was 15.2 ± 2.12 years. Time to surgery was significantly different among subjects who required multiple additional surgical procedures at time of ACL reconstruction (median, 3.3 months) compared with subjects with 1 (median, 2.0 months) or no additional injuries (median, 1.6 months). Subjects underwent ACL reconstruction significantly sooner if they were older at the time of injury (hazard ratio [HR], 1.2 per 1 year; 95% CI, 1.1-1.2; P < .0001) or were covered by a commercial insurance plan (HR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.6-2.6; P < .0001). Median time to ACL surgery was 1.5 months (95% CI, 1.3-1.7) for subjects with commercial insurance plans compared with 3.0 months (95% CI, 2.3-3.3) for subjects with noncommercial insurance coverage.

Conclusion: The risk of delayed ACL surgery was significantly higher among pediatric and adolescent subjects who were less affluent, who were covered by a noncommercial insurance plan, and who were younger. This study also confirms previous studies that have reported an association between a delay in ACL surgery and the presence of additional knee injuries requiring operative treatment, accentuating the importance of timely care.

Clinical relevance: Access to care is a current area of research interest and health policy formation. Information in this arena drives 2 important aspects of health: most immediately, care provided to patients, and over a broader scope, the policy that directs health care. The orthopaedic surgeon should be aware of the association between socioeconomic and demographic factors and ACL surgery timing to optimize outcomes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Household income. Relationship between household income and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery timing in the first 2 years after the initial injury. The top line represents the time to ACL surgery among subjects with a household income <75th percentile for the entire study population. The bottom line represents the time to ACL surgery among subjects with a household income ≥75th percentile for the entire study population.
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fig4-2325967114548176: Household income. Relationship between household income and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery timing in the first 2 years after the initial injury. The top line represents the time to ACL surgery among subjects with a household income <75th percentile for the entire study population. The bottom line represents the time to ACL surgery among subjects with a household income ≥75th percentile for the entire study population.

Mentions: In the univariable Cox proportional-hazards regression analyses, insurance coverage type (P < .0001), household income (P = .0003), and age at injury (P = .0002) were significantly associated with the risk of delayed surgery. Differences in the median time to ACL surgery based on insurance status, age, and income are illustrated in Table 3, as well as Figures 2 to 4. Sex (P = .2358), obesity (P = .1228), ethnicity (P = .2405), and race (P = .6812) were not significantly related to the risk of delayed surgery.


Delay to Reconstruction of the Adolescent Anterior Cruciate Ligament: The Socioeconomic Impact on Treatment.

Newman JT, Carry PM, Terhune EB, Spruiell M, Heare A, Mayo M, Vidal AF - Orthop J Sports Med (2014)

Household income. Relationship between household income and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery timing in the first 2 years after the initial injury. The top line represents the time to ACL surgery among subjects with a household income <75th percentile for the entire study population. The bottom line represents the time to ACL surgery among subjects with a household income ≥75th percentile for the entire study population.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555578&req=5

fig4-2325967114548176: Household income. Relationship between household income and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery timing in the first 2 years after the initial injury. The top line represents the time to ACL surgery among subjects with a household income <75th percentile for the entire study population. The bottom line represents the time to ACL surgery among subjects with a household income ≥75th percentile for the entire study population.
Mentions: In the univariable Cox proportional-hazards regression analyses, insurance coverage type (P < .0001), household income (P = .0003), and age at injury (P = .0002) were significantly associated with the risk of delayed surgery. Differences in the median time to ACL surgery based on insurance status, age, and income are illustrated in Table 3, as well as Figures 2 to 4. Sex (P = .2358), obesity (P = .1228), ethnicity (P = .2405), and race (P = .6812) were not significantly related to the risk of delayed surgery.

Bottom Line: Median time to ACL surgery was 1.5 months (95% CI, 1.3-1.7) for subjects with commercial insurance plans compared with 3.0 months (95% CI, 2.3-3.3) for subjects with noncommercial insurance coverage.The risk of delayed ACL surgery was significantly higher among pediatric and adolescent subjects who were less affluent, who were covered by a noncommercial insurance plan, and who were younger.The orthopaedic surgeon should be aware of the association between socioeconomic and demographic factors and ACL surgery timing to optimize outcomes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: A delay in pediatric and adolescent anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is associated with an increase in the number of concomitant meniscal and chondral injuries. Factors that contribute to this delay have not been well described.

Hypothesis: Socioeconomic and demographic factors are related to ACL surgery timing.

Study methods: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3.

Methods: All subjects who underwent primary ACL reconstruction at a single tertiary pediatric hospital between 2005 and 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Variables included concomitant knee injuries (cartilage or meniscus injuries requiring additional operative treatment) and chronologic, demographic, and socioeconomic factors. Multivariable Cox proportional-hazards analyses were used to identify factors related to ACL surgery timing.

Results: The mean age of the 272 subjects was 15.2 ± 2.12 years. Time to surgery was significantly different among subjects who required multiple additional surgical procedures at time of ACL reconstruction (median, 3.3 months) compared with subjects with 1 (median, 2.0 months) or no additional injuries (median, 1.6 months). Subjects underwent ACL reconstruction significantly sooner if they were older at the time of injury (hazard ratio [HR], 1.2 per 1 year; 95% CI, 1.1-1.2; P < .0001) or were covered by a commercial insurance plan (HR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.6-2.6; P < .0001). Median time to ACL surgery was 1.5 months (95% CI, 1.3-1.7) for subjects with commercial insurance plans compared with 3.0 months (95% CI, 2.3-3.3) for subjects with noncommercial insurance coverage.

Conclusion: The risk of delayed ACL surgery was significantly higher among pediatric and adolescent subjects who were less affluent, who were covered by a noncommercial insurance plan, and who were younger. This study also confirms previous studies that have reported an association between a delay in ACL surgery and the presence of additional knee injuries requiring operative treatment, accentuating the importance of timely care.

Clinical relevance: Access to care is a current area of research interest and health policy formation. Information in this arena drives 2 important aspects of health: most immediately, care provided to patients, and over a broader scope, the policy that directs health care. The orthopaedic surgeon should be aware of the association between socioeconomic and demographic factors and ACL surgery timing to optimize outcomes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus