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Subacromial Injection Results in Further Scapular Dyskinesis.

Ettinger L, Shapiro M, Karduna A - Orthop J Sports Med (2014)

Bottom Line: Subacromial injections of anesthetics resulted in increased scapular anterior tilting; however, no changes were noted in upward or internal rotation.When compared with healthy controls, patients had greater anterior tilting and upward rotation of the scapula.The study findings indicate that the removal of pain in patients with impingement results in further dyskinesis of the scapula.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Exercise Science, Willamette University, Salem, Oregon, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Scapular kinematic movement patterns between patients with subacromial impingement and healthy controls have been extensively investigated. However, a high degree of variability has been reported in the literature pertaining to differences between these 2 groups.

Purpose: To investigate the influence of subacromial pain on scapular kinematics.

Study design: Controlled laboratory study.

Methods: A total of 21 patients with stage 2 subacromial impingement who received local anesthetic injections as part of their normal treatment were recruited for this study. The postinjection kinematic data from these patients were compared with those of healthy age-, sex-, and arm dominance-matched controls.

Results: Subacromial injections of anesthetics resulted in increased scapular anterior tilting; however, no changes were noted in upward or internal rotation. When compared with healthy controls, patients had greater anterior tilting and upward rotation of the scapula.

Conclusion: The study findings indicate that the removal of pain in patients with impingement results in further dyskinesis of the scapula.

Clinical relevance: Pain may be causing patients with subacromial impingement to limit scapular tilt and upward rotation, and movement limitations may continue after an anesthetic injection.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Experimental setup depicting electromagnetic scapular and humeral sensors.
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fig1-2325967114544104: Experimental setup depicting electromagnetic scapular and humeral sensors.

Mentions: The Fastrak magnetic tracking device (Polhemus) was used for collecting 3-dimensional in vivo kinematics of the shoulder complex (Figure 1). The Polhemus unit consists of a transmitter, 3 receivers, and a digitizer, all wired to a system electronics unit that determines the relative orientation and position of the sensors in space. The transmitter serves as a global reference frame and was fixed to a rigid plastic base and oriented such that its coordinate axes aligned with the cardinal planes of the human body. The digitizer sensor was used to identify anatomical landmarks with respect to the global reference frame. After digitization, the arbitrary coordinate systems defined by the Polhemus were converted to anatomically appropriate coordinate systems based on the recommendations of the International Society of Biomechanics Committee for Standardization and Terminology.40


Subacromial Injection Results in Further Scapular Dyskinesis.

Ettinger L, Shapiro M, Karduna A - Orthop J Sports Med (2014)

Experimental setup depicting electromagnetic scapular and humeral sensors.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555573&req=5

fig1-2325967114544104: Experimental setup depicting electromagnetic scapular and humeral sensors.
Mentions: The Fastrak magnetic tracking device (Polhemus) was used for collecting 3-dimensional in vivo kinematics of the shoulder complex (Figure 1). The Polhemus unit consists of a transmitter, 3 receivers, and a digitizer, all wired to a system electronics unit that determines the relative orientation and position of the sensors in space. The transmitter serves as a global reference frame and was fixed to a rigid plastic base and oriented such that its coordinate axes aligned with the cardinal planes of the human body. The digitizer sensor was used to identify anatomical landmarks with respect to the global reference frame. After digitization, the arbitrary coordinate systems defined by the Polhemus were converted to anatomically appropriate coordinate systems based on the recommendations of the International Society of Biomechanics Committee for Standardization and Terminology.40

Bottom Line: Subacromial injections of anesthetics resulted in increased scapular anterior tilting; however, no changes were noted in upward or internal rotation.When compared with healthy controls, patients had greater anterior tilting and upward rotation of the scapula.The study findings indicate that the removal of pain in patients with impingement results in further dyskinesis of the scapula.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Exercise Science, Willamette University, Salem, Oregon, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Scapular kinematic movement patterns between patients with subacromial impingement and healthy controls have been extensively investigated. However, a high degree of variability has been reported in the literature pertaining to differences between these 2 groups.

Purpose: To investigate the influence of subacromial pain on scapular kinematics.

Study design: Controlled laboratory study.

Methods: A total of 21 patients with stage 2 subacromial impingement who received local anesthetic injections as part of their normal treatment were recruited for this study. The postinjection kinematic data from these patients were compared with those of healthy age-, sex-, and arm dominance-matched controls.

Results: Subacromial injections of anesthetics resulted in increased scapular anterior tilting; however, no changes were noted in upward or internal rotation. When compared with healthy controls, patients had greater anterior tilting and upward rotation of the scapula.

Conclusion: The study findings indicate that the removal of pain in patients with impingement results in further dyskinesis of the scapula.

Clinical relevance: Pain may be causing patients with subacromial impingement to limit scapular tilt and upward rotation, and movement limitations may continue after an anesthetic injection.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus