Limits...
A Preliminary In Vivo Assessment of Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Deficient Knee Kinematics With the KneeM Device: A New Method to Assess Rotatory Laxity Using Open MRI.

Tardy N, Marchand P, Kouyoumdjian P, Blin D, Demattei C, Asencio G - Orthop J Sports Med (2014)

Bottom Line: However, significant differences in the anterior translation of the lateral compartment were observed between ACL-deficient and intact contralateral knees at 0° and 20° of flexion (P = .005 and P = .002, respectively).This preliminary study suggests that measurement of tibiofemoral movements in both compartments during flexion using the KneeM device was useful for quantifying rotatory laxity in ACL-deficient knees.Moreover, this device seemed to allow a "mechanized pivot shift" and allowed reproduction of the "pivot" phase in the MRI field between 20° and 40° of flexion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Orthopaedic Department, CHU de Nîmes, Nîmes, France.

ABSTRACT

Background: Methods of objectively measuring rotational knee laxity are either experimental or difficult to use in daily practice. A new method has been developed to quantitatively assess rotatory laxity using an open MRI system and new tool, the KneeM device.

Purpose/hypothesis: To perform a preliminary evaluation of a novel knee rotation measurement device to assess knee kinematics during flexion in an MRI field, in both anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-deficient and healthy contralateral knees. The hypothesis was that the KneeM device would allow in vivo reproduction and analysis of knee kinematics during flexion in healthy and ACL-deficient knees.

Study design: Controlled laboratory study.

Methods: Ten subjects (7 men and 3 women; mean age ± standard deviation, 32.3 ± 9.4 years) with ACL-deficient knees and contralateral uninjured knees participated in the study. An open MRI was performed with the KneeM device at a mean 4.9 months (range, 3.0-7 months) after ACL injury. The device exerted on the knee an anterior drawer force of 100 N, with an internal rotation of 20°, through the range of flexion (0°, 20°, 40°, and 60°). Both ACL-deficient and healthy contralateral knees were analyzed using the Iwaki method.

Results: There was no statistical difference of anterior translation in the medial compartment between intact and ACL-deficient knees at all degrees of flexion. However, significant differences in the anterior translation of the lateral compartment were observed between ACL-deficient and intact contralateral knees at 0° and 20° of flexion (P = .005 and P = .002, respectively). Between 20° and 40°, the lateral plateau of ACL-deficient knees translated 7.7 mm posteriorly, whereas the medial compartment remained stable, reflecting a sudden external rotation of the lateral plateau under the femoral condyle.

Conclusion: This preliminary study suggests that measurement of tibiofemoral movements in both compartments during flexion using the KneeM device was useful for quantifying rotatory laxity in ACL-deficient knees. Moreover, this device seemed to allow a "mechanized pivot shift" and allowed reproduction of the "pivot" phase in the MRI field between 20° and 40° of flexion.

Clinical relevance: This device could be used for diagnostic purposes or to investigate the outcomes of ACL reconstructions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Diagram of the femoral condyle overlaid with solid lines representing the posterior tibial cortices at each degree of flexion (0°, 20°, 40°, and 60°) of the healthy knees (A) and the anterior cruciate ligament–deficient knees (B). The Y-axis represents the average distances (mm) from the ipsilateral posterior tibial cortex to the FFC (distance “D”). X, axis of rotation.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555568&req=5

fig4-2325967114525583: Diagram of the femoral condyle overlaid with solid lines representing the posterior tibial cortices at each degree of flexion (0°, 20°, 40°, and 60°) of the healthy knees (A) and the anterior cruciate ligament–deficient knees (B). The Y-axis represents the average distances (mm) from the ipsilateral posterior tibial cortex to the FFC (distance “D”). X, axis of rotation.

Mentions: The results of the anterior tibial translation during flexion, for both knees, are presented at the center of the medial and the lateral compartments (Table 1 and Figure 4).


A Preliminary In Vivo Assessment of Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Deficient Knee Kinematics With the KneeM Device: A New Method to Assess Rotatory Laxity Using Open MRI.

Tardy N, Marchand P, Kouyoumdjian P, Blin D, Demattei C, Asencio G - Orthop J Sports Med (2014)

Diagram of the femoral condyle overlaid with solid lines representing the posterior tibial cortices at each degree of flexion (0°, 20°, 40°, and 60°) of the healthy knees (A) and the anterior cruciate ligament–deficient knees (B). The Y-axis represents the average distances (mm) from the ipsilateral posterior tibial cortex to the FFC (distance “D”). X, axis of rotation.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555568&req=5

fig4-2325967114525583: Diagram of the femoral condyle overlaid with solid lines representing the posterior tibial cortices at each degree of flexion (0°, 20°, 40°, and 60°) of the healthy knees (A) and the anterior cruciate ligament–deficient knees (B). The Y-axis represents the average distances (mm) from the ipsilateral posterior tibial cortex to the FFC (distance “D”). X, axis of rotation.
Mentions: The results of the anterior tibial translation during flexion, for both knees, are presented at the center of the medial and the lateral compartments (Table 1 and Figure 4).

Bottom Line: However, significant differences in the anterior translation of the lateral compartment were observed between ACL-deficient and intact contralateral knees at 0° and 20° of flexion (P = .005 and P = .002, respectively).This preliminary study suggests that measurement of tibiofemoral movements in both compartments during flexion using the KneeM device was useful for quantifying rotatory laxity in ACL-deficient knees.Moreover, this device seemed to allow a "mechanized pivot shift" and allowed reproduction of the "pivot" phase in the MRI field between 20° and 40° of flexion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Orthopaedic Department, CHU de Nîmes, Nîmes, France.

ABSTRACT

Background: Methods of objectively measuring rotational knee laxity are either experimental or difficult to use in daily practice. A new method has been developed to quantitatively assess rotatory laxity using an open MRI system and new tool, the KneeM device.

Purpose/hypothesis: To perform a preliminary evaluation of a novel knee rotation measurement device to assess knee kinematics during flexion in an MRI field, in both anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-deficient and healthy contralateral knees. The hypothesis was that the KneeM device would allow in vivo reproduction and analysis of knee kinematics during flexion in healthy and ACL-deficient knees.

Study design: Controlled laboratory study.

Methods: Ten subjects (7 men and 3 women; mean age ± standard deviation, 32.3 ± 9.4 years) with ACL-deficient knees and contralateral uninjured knees participated in the study. An open MRI was performed with the KneeM device at a mean 4.9 months (range, 3.0-7 months) after ACL injury. The device exerted on the knee an anterior drawer force of 100 N, with an internal rotation of 20°, through the range of flexion (0°, 20°, 40°, and 60°). Both ACL-deficient and healthy contralateral knees were analyzed using the Iwaki method.

Results: There was no statistical difference of anterior translation in the medial compartment between intact and ACL-deficient knees at all degrees of flexion. However, significant differences in the anterior translation of the lateral compartment were observed between ACL-deficient and intact contralateral knees at 0° and 20° of flexion (P = .005 and P = .002, respectively). Between 20° and 40°, the lateral plateau of ACL-deficient knees translated 7.7 mm posteriorly, whereas the medial compartment remained stable, reflecting a sudden external rotation of the lateral plateau under the femoral condyle.

Conclusion: This preliminary study suggests that measurement of tibiofemoral movements in both compartments during flexion using the KneeM device was useful for quantifying rotatory laxity in ACL-deficient knees. Moreover, this device seemed to allow a "mechanized pivot shift" and allowed reproduction of the "pivot" phase in the MRI field between 20° and 40° of flexion.

Clinical relevance: This device could be used for diagnostic purposes or to investigate the outcomes of ACL reconstructions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus