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Barefoot Running: The Effects of an 8-Week Barefoot Training Program.

Mullen S, Cotton J, Bechtold M, Toby EB - Orthop J Sports Med (2014)

Bottom Line: Five subjects completed the pretests but did not complete the study for reasons not related to study outcomes.However, when comparing the differences in changes from baseline to 8 weeks between the barefoot and control groups, the improvements were not significant at the .05 level for all measures.Although statistically significant changes were not observed between the pre- and posttest evaluations in strength and proprioception with the 8-week low-intensity barefoot running regimen, this does not necessarily mean that these changes do not occur.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Sports Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: It has been proposed that running barefoot can lead to improved strength and proprioception. However, the duration that a runner must train barefoot to observe these changes is unknown.

Hypothesis: Runners participating in a barefoot running program will have improved proprioception, increased lower extremity strength, and an increase in the volume or size of the intrinsic musculature of the feet.

Study design: Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 2.

Methods: In this 8-week study, 29 runners with a mean age of 36.34 years were randomized into either a control group (n = 10) who completed training in their regular running shoes or to an experimental barefoot group (n = 14). Pretraining tests consisted of a volumetric measurement of the foot followed by a strength and dynamic balance assessment. Five subjects completed the pretests but did not complete the study for reasons not related to study outcomes. Participants then completed 8 weeks of training runs. They repeated the strength and dynamic balance assessment after 8 weeks.

Results: Significant changes from baseline to 8 weeks were observed within the barefoot group for single-leg hop (right, P = .0121; left, P = .0430) and reach and balance (right, P = .0029) and within the control group for single-left leg hop (P = .0286) and reach and balance (right, P = .0096; left, P = .0014). However, when comparing the differences in changes from baseline to 8 weeks between the barefoot and control groups, the improvements were not significant at the .05 level for all measures.

Conclusion: Although statistically significant changes were not observed between the pre- and posttest evaluations in strength and proprioception with the 8-week low-intensity barefoot running regimen, this does not necessarily mean that these changes do not occur. It is possible that it may take months or years to observe these changes, and a short course such as this trial is insufficient.

No MeSH data available.


The 8-week training schedule.
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fig2-2325967114525582: The 8-week training schedule.

Mentions: The participants then completed 8 weeks of training runs. These runs were performed 2 times per week on a grass surface. A grass surface was selected because of the potential injury risk to the participants. Each week they completed an interval run and a steady state run. All participants had minimal or no experience running barefoot. Therefore, the training protocol was intentionally designed to be relatively low intensity to prevent injury in the runners. The distance of the runs increased gradually each week in both the interval run and the steady state run. See Figure 2 for additional details of the 8-week schedule. Their activity outside the study runs was not restricted; however, it was documented. All participants completed at least 13 of 16 runs at the end of the study.


Barefoot Running: The Effects of an 8-Week Barefoot Training Program.

Mullen S, Cotton J, Bechtold M, Toby EB - Orthop J Sports Med (2014)

The 8-week training schedule.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555562&req=5

fig2-2325967114525582: The 8-week training schedule.
Mentions: The participants then completed 8 weeks of training runs. These runs were performed 2 times per week on a grass surface. A grass surface was selected because of the potential injury risk to the participants. Each week they completed an interval run and a steady state run. All participants had minimal or no experience running barefoot. Therefore, the training protocol was intentionally designed to be relatively low intensity to prevent injury in the runners. The distance of the runs increased gradually each week in both the interval run and the steady state run. See Figure 2 for additional details of the 8-week schedule. Their activity outside the study runs was not restricted; however, it was documented. All participants completed at least 13 of 16 runs at the end of the study.

Bottom Line: Five subjects completed the pretests but did not complete the study for reasons not related to study outcomes.However, when comparing the differences in changes from baseline to 8 weeks between the barefoot and control groups, the improvements were not significant at the .05 level for all measures.Although statistically significant changes were not observed between the pre- and posttest evaluations in strength and proprioception with the 8-week low-intensity barefoot running regimen, this does not necessarily mean that these changes do not occur.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Sports Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: It has been proposed that running barefoot can lead to improved strength and proprioception. However, the duration that a runner must train barefoot to observe these changes is unknown.

Hypothesis: Runners participating in a barefoot running program will have improved proprioception, increased lower extremity strength, and an increase in the volume or size of the intrinsic musculature of the feet.

Study design: Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 2.

Methods: In this 8-week study, 29 runners with a mean age of 36.34 years were randomized into either a control group (n = 10) who completed training in their regular running shoes or to an experimental barefoot group (n = 14). Pretraining tests consisted of a volumetric measurement of the foot followed by a strength and dynamic balance assessment. Five subjects completed the pretests but did not complete the study for reasons not related to study outcomes. Participants then completed 8 weeks of training runs. They repeated the strength and dynamic balance assessment after 8 weeks.

Results: Significant changes from baseline to 8 weeks were observed within the barefoot group for single-leg hop (right, P = .0121; left, P = .0430) and reach and balance (right, P = .0029) and within the control group for single-left leg hop (P = .0286) and reach and balance (right, P = .0096; left, P = .0014). However, when comparing the differences in changes from baseline to 8 weeks between the barefoot and control groups, the improvements were not significant at the .05 level for all measures.

Conclusion: Although statistically significant changes were not observed between the pre- and posttest evaluations in strength and proprioception with the 8-week low-intensity barefoot running regimen, this does not necessarily mean that these changes do not occur. It is possible that it may take months or years to observe these changes, and a short course such as this trial is insufficient.

No MeSH data available.