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Incidence and Nature of Medical Attendance Injuries in English Community Rugby Union.

Roberts SP, Trewartha G, England M, Stokes KA - Orthop J Sports Med (2014)

Bottom Line: The overall medical attendance incidence was 229 per 1000 player-match hours (95% CI, 226-232), with 45 players removed per 1000 player-match hours (95% CI, 44-46).Attendance incidence for group A (294 per 1000 player-match hours; 95% CI, 287-301) was higher compared with group B (213; 95% CI, 208-218; P < .001) and C (204; 95% CI, 200-209; P < .001).There was a higher incidence of attendances to forwards (254; 95% CI, 249-259) compared with backs (191; 95% CI, 187-196; P < .001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department for Health, University of Bath, Bath, UK.

ABSTRACT

Background: Previous research has identified injury patterns during community-level rugby union match play, but none have investigated the frequency and reasons for on-field injury management.

Purpose: To establish the frequency, reasons, and patterns of on-field injury management in English community rugby, including differences between different levels of play.

Study design: Descriptive epidemiology study.

Methods: Over 3 seasons, injury information was collected from 46 (2009-2010), 67 (2010-2011), and 76 (2011-2012) English community clubs (Rugby Football Union [RFU] levels 3-9). Club injury management staff reported information for all medical attendances during match play, including details on the injury site and type, playing position (seasons 2010-2011 and 2011-2012 only), and whether the player was removed from play. Clubs were subdivided into groups A (RFU levels 3 and 4 [mainly semiprofessional]; n = 39), B (RFU levels 5 and 6 [mainly amateur]; n = 71), and C (RFU levels 7-9 [social and recreational]; n = 79) to differentiate playing levels.

Results: The overall medical attendance incidence was 229 per 1000 player-match hours (95% CI, 226-232), with 45 players removed per 1000 player-match hours (95% CI, 44-46). Attendance incidence for group A (294 per 1000 player-match hours; 95% CI, 287-301) was higher compared with group B (213; 95% CI, 208-218; P < .001) and C (204; 95% CI, 200-209; P < .001). There was a higher incidence of attendances to forwards (254; 95% CI, 249-259) compared with backs (191; 95% CI, 187-196; P < .001). The head was the most common specific site of injury (55 per 1000 player-match hours; 95% CI, 53-57) but the lower limb region overall accounted for most attendances (87; 95% CI, 85-89) and the greatest chance of removal from the pitch (22; 95% CI, 21-23).

Conclusion: With the likelihood of 1 injury for each team per match severe enough for the player to leave the pitch and with at least 1 attendance for a head injury per match, there is clear evidence that pitch side staff should be trained to recognize potentially serious injuries.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Incidence of medical attendances by body region for each group. *Significantly different versus groups B and C (all P < .05). #Significantly different versus all other body regions (P < .001). Group A, mainly semiprofessional clubs; group B, mainly amateur clubs; group C, mainly social and recreational clubs.
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fig1-2325967114562781: Incidence of medical attendances by body region for each group. *Significantly different versus groups B and C (all P < .05). #Significantly different versus all other body regions (P < .001). Group A, mainly semiprofessional clubs; group B, mainly amateur clubs; group C, mainly social and recreational clubs.

Mentions: For all groups combined, there was a higher incidence of attendances (all P < .001) for injuries to the lower limb (87 attendances per 1000 player hours; 95% CI, 85-89) compared with the head/neck (68; 95% CI, 67-70), upper limb (48; 95% CI, 47-50), and trunk (25; 95% CI, 24-26) regions (Figure 1). Incidence of attendances was higher for all body regions in group A compared with groups B and C (all P < .001) (Figure 1). Attendances to the lower limb also resulted in the greatest chance of the player being removed from play (27% of all lower limb injuries removed) compared with all other body regions (P < .001). There was a greater chance of being removed for attendances to the trunk (22%) compared with the upper limb (19%; P < .05), while attendances to the head/neck (15%) resulted in lower chance of removal compared with all other regions (all P < .05).


Incidence and Nature of Medical Attendance Injuries in English Community Rugby Union.

Roberts SP, Trewartha G, England M, Stokes KA - Orthop J Sports Med (2014)

Incidence of medical attendances by body region for each group. *Significantly different versus groups B and C (all P < .05). #Significantly different versus all other body regions (P < .001). Group A, mainly semiprofessional clubs; group B, mainly amateur clubs; group C, mainly social and recreational clubs.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555534&req=5

fig1-2325967114562781: Incidence of medical attendances by body region for each group. *Significantly different versus groups B and C (all P < .05). #Significantly different versus all other body regions (P < .001). Group A, mainly semiprofessional clubs; group B, mainly amateur clubs; group C, mainly social and recreational clubs.
Mentions: For all groups combined, there was a higher incidence of attendances (all P < .001) for injuries to the lower limb (87 attendances per 1000 player hours; 95% CI, 85-89) compared with the head/neck (68; 95% CI, 67-70), upper limb (48; 95% CI, 47-50), and trunk (25; 95% CI, 24-26) regions (Figure 1). Incidence of attendances was higher for all body regions in group A compared with groups B and C (all P < .001) (Figure 1). Attendances to the lower limb also resulted in the greatest chance of the player being removed from play (27% of all lower limb injuries removed) compared with all other body regions (P < .001). There was a greater chance of being removed for attendances to the trunk (22%) compared with the upper limb (19%; P < .05), while attendances to the head/neck (15%) resulted in lower chance of removal compared with all other regions (all P < .05).

Bottom Line: The overall medical attendance incidence was 229 per 1000 player-match hours (95% CI, 226-232), with 45 players removed per 1000 player-match hours (95% CI, 44-46).Attendance incidence for group A (294 per 1000 player-match hours; 95% CI, 287-301) was higher compared with group B (213; 95% CI, 208-218; P < .001) and C (204; 95% CI, 200-209; P < .001).There was a higher incidence of attendances to forwards (254; 95% CI, 249-259) compared with backs (191; 95% CI, 187-196; P < .001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department for Health, University of Bath, Bath, UK.

ABSTRACT

Background: Previous research has identified injury patterns during community-level rugby union match play, but none have investigated the frequency and reasons for on-field injury management.

Purpose: To establish the frequency, reasons, and patterns of on-field injury management in English community rugby, including differences between different levels of play.

Study design: Descriptive epidemiology study.

Methods: Over 3 seasons, injury information was collected from 46 (2009-2010), 67 (2010-2011), and 76 (2011-2012) English community clubs (Rugby Football Union [RFU] levels 3-9). Club injury management staff reported information for all medical attendances during match play, including details on the injury site and type, playing position (seasons 2010-2011 and 2011-2012 only), and whether the player was removed from play. Clubs were subdivided into groups A (RFU levels 3 and 4 [mainly semiprofessional]; n = 39), B (RFU levels 5 and 6 [mainly amateur]; n = 71), and C (RFU levels 7-9 [social and recreational]; n = 79) to differentiate playing levels.

Results: The overall medical attendance incidence was 229 per 1000 player-match hours (95% CI, 226-232), with 45 players removed per 1000 player-match hours (95% CI, 44-46). Attendance incidence for group A (294 per 1000 player-match hours; 95% CI, 287-301) was higher compared with group B (213; 95% CI, 208-218; P < .001) and C (204; 95% CI, 200-209; P < .001). There was a higher incidence of attendances to forwards (254; 95% CI, 249-259) compared with backs (191; 95% CI, 187-196; P < .001). The head was the most common specific site of injury (55 per 1000 player-match hours; 95% CI, 53-57) but the lower limb region overall accounted for most attendances (87; 95% CI, 85-89) and the greatest chance of removal from the pitch (22; 95% CI, 21-23).

Conclusion: With the likelihood of 1 injury for each team per match severe enough for the player to leave the pitch and with at least 1 attendance for a head injury per match, there is clear evidence that pitch side staff should be trained to recognize potentially serious injuries.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus