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Return to Sport and Performance After Microfracture in the Knees of National Basketball Association Players.

Harris JD, Walton DM, Erickson BJ, Verma NN, Abrams GD, Bush-Joseph CA, Bach BR, Cole BJ - Orthop J Sports Med (2013)

Bottom Line: RTS and performance were analyzed and compared between cases and controls.Student t tests were performed for analysis of within- and between-group variables.Time to RTS in NBA was 9.20 ± 4.88 months.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Houston Methodist Center for Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA. ; Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Use of microfracture in the knees of National Basketball Association (NBA) players is controversial.

Hypotheses: (1) There would be a high rate of return to sport (RTS) in NBA players following microfracture, (2) players would RTS the season following surgery, (3) preoperative player performance would not be significantly different on RTS, and (4) there would be no significant difference in RTS rate or postoperative performance in players undergoing microfracture in comparison with an age-, position-, NBA experience-, and performance-matched control group.

Study design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3.

Methods: NBA players undergoing microfracture were evaluated. Age-, body mass index-, position-, NBA experience-, and performance-matched controls were selected from the NBA during the same years as those undergoing microfracture. An index year was selected (controls) to match the number of seasons of NBA experience in microfracture cases. RTS and performance were analyzed and compared between cases and controls. Student t tests were performed for analysis of within- and between-group variables.

Results: A total of 41 NBA players underwent microfracture and were compared with 41 demographic- and performance-matched controls. Rate of RTS after microfracture was 73% in the NBA and 83% in professional basketball (NBA, D-league, and International Basketball Federation [FIBA]). Time to RTS in NBA was 9.20 ± 4.88 months. Seventy-one percent (29/41) of players RTS the season following microfracture. Length of NBA career following microfracture (4.10 ± 3.91 years) was not significantly different from controls. After microfracture, case athletes played fewer games per season and with fewer points and steals per game (relative to premicrofracture; P < .05). Performance was better in control (after index year) versus case players (after microfracture) with regard to points per game, games played per season, and field goal and free throw percentage (P < .05).

Conclusion: Eighty-three percent of NBA players undergoing microfracture returned to professional basketball. Career length was not significantly different between players undergoing microfracture and controls. However, following microfracture, players competed in fewer games per season with fewer points and steals.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Survival in the National Basketball Association (NBA) following microfracture (or index year in controls).
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fig2-2325967113512759: Survival in the National Basketball Association (NBA) following microfracture (or index year in controls).

Mentions: Survival in the NBA following microfracture was not significantly different at years 1 (P = .066), 2 (P = .322), or 5 (P = .077) versus control players (Figure 2). However, at years 3 (P = .043; 95% CI, 0.007-0.431) and 4 (P = .026; 95% CI, 0.029-0.459), there were significantly more control players in the NBA. Length of career in NBA following microfracture was not significantly different from controls (Table 4). Performance was significantly better in controls versus cases with regard to points per game, field goal percentage, and free throw percentage (Table 4). Furthermore, controls played significantly more games per season than cases. For individual years 1 through 5 following microfracture (or index year in controls), there was no significant difference in any performance parameter at any year with the following exception: controls played more games in season 1 (67.6 ± 15.1 vs 41.6 ± 25.8 games; P < .001) (see the Appendix).


Return to Sport and Performance After Microfracture in the Knees of National Basketball Association Players.

Harris JD, Walton DM, Erickson BJ, Verma NN, Abrams GD, Bush-Joseph CA, Bach BR, Cole BJ - Orthop J Sports Med (2013)

Survival in the National Basketball Association (NBA) following microfracture (or index year in controls).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555513&req=5

fig2-2325967113512759: Survival in the National Basketball Association (NBA) following microfracture (or index year in controls).
Mentions: Survival in the NBA following microfracture was not significantly different at years 1 (P = .066), 2 (P = .322), or 5 (P = .077) versus control players (Figure 2). However, at years 3 (P = .043; 95% CI, 0.007-0.431) and 4 (P = .026; 95% CI, 0.029-0.459), there were significantly more control players in the NBA. Length of career in NBA following microfracture was not significantly different from controls (Table 4). Performance was significantly better in controls versus cases with regard to points per game, field goal percentage, and free throw percentage (Table 4). Furthermore, controls played significantly more games per season than cases. For individual years 1 through 5 following microfracture (or index year in controls), there was no significant difference in any performance parameter at any year with the following exception: controls played more games in season 1 (67.6 ± 15.1 vs 41.6 ± 25.8 games; P < .001) (see the Appendix).

Bottom Line: RTS and performance were analyzed and compared between cases and controls.Student t tests were performed for analysis of within- and between-group variables.Time to RTS in NBA was 9.20 ± 4.88 months.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Houston Methodist Center for Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA. ; Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Use of microfracture in the knees of National Basketball Association (NBA) players is controversial.

Hypotheses: (1) There would be a high rate of return to sport (RTS) in NBA players following microfracture, (2) players would RTS the season following surgery, (3) preoperative player performance would not be significantly different on RTS, and (4) there would be no significant difference in RTS rate or postoperative performance in players undergoing microfracture in comparison with an age-, position-, NBA experience-, and performance-matched control group.

Study design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3.

Methods: NBA players undergoing microfracture were evaluated. Age-, body mass index-, position-, NBA experience-, and performance-matched controls were selected from the NBA during the same years as those undergoing microfracture. An index year was selected (controls) to match the number of seasons of NBA experience in microfracture cases. RTS and performance were analyzed and compared between cases and controls. Student t tests were performed for analysis of within- and between-group variables.

Results: A total of 41 NBA players underwent microfracture and were compared with 41 demographic- and performance-matched controls. Rate of RTS after microfracture was 73% in the NBA and 83% in professional basketball (NBA, D-league, and International Basketball Federation [FIBA]). Time to RTS in NBA was 9.20 ± 4.88 months. Seventy-one percent (29/41) of players RTS the season following microfracture. Length of NBA career following microfracture (4.10 ± 3.91 years) was not significantly different from controls. After microfracture, case athletes played fewer games per season and with fewer points and steals per game (relative to premicrofracture; P < .05). Performance was better in control (after index year) versus case players (after microfracture) with regard to points per game, games played per season, and field goal and free throw percentage (P < .05).

Conclusion: Eighty-three percent of NBA players undergoing microfracture returned to professional basketball. Career length was not significantly different between players undergoing microfracture and controls. However, following microfracture, players competed in fewer games per season with fewer points and steals.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus