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Performance and Return to Sport After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in X-Games Skiers and Snowboarders.

Erickson BJ, Harris JD, Fillingham YA, Cvetanovich GL, Bhatia S, Bach BR, Bush-Joseph CA, Cole BJ - Orthop J Sports Med (2013)

Bottom Line: Fifteen skiers (19 knees) and 10 snowboarders (10 knees) were analyzed.There were 13 males and 12 females, with a mean subject age of 22.6 ± 4.45 years.Skiers earned a similar number of medals preinjury and postsurgery, while snowboarders earned more medals following surgery.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Skiing and snowboarding have become increasingly popular since the inception of the winter X-Games in 1997.

Purpose: To determine (1) rate of return to sport (RTS) to the winter X-Games following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and (2) performance upon RTS following ACL reconstruction.

Hypotheses: There is a high rate of RTS to the winter X-Games in subjects undergoing ACL reconstruction. There is no difference in performance upon RTS following ACL reconstruction versus preinjury.

Study design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4.

Methods: Skiers and snowboarders competing in the winter X-Games who tore their ACL and underwent ACL reconstruction between 1997 and 2012 were evaluated. Athlete data were extracted from winter X-Games media websites, ESPN, injury reports, player profiles/biographies, and press releases. All athlete, knee, and surgical demographic data were analyzed. RTS and performance as it related to the number of gold, silver, and bronze medals won both pre- and postoperatively in the X-Games were analyzed.

Results: Fifteen skiers (19 knees) and 10 snowboarders (10 knees) were analyzed. There were 13 males and 12 females, with a mean subject age of 22.6 ± 4.45 years. The rate of RTS in the X-Games following ACL reconstruction was 80% overall (20/25 subjects). The rate of RTS in winter X-Games following ACL reconstruction in skiers was 87% (13/15 subjects) and in snowboarders was 70% (7/10 subjects). The rate of RTS in winter X-Games following ACL reconstruction in males and females was 85% (11/13 subjects) and 75% (9/12 subjects), respectively. The rate of revision ACL reconstruction due to ACL tear following primary ACL reconstruction was 4% (1/25 subjects). There were more left- than right-sided tears (18 vs 11). Skiers and snowboarders competed in the X-Games for 3.84 ± 2.73 and 3.40 ± 2.84 years prior to ACL reconstruction and 2.56 ± 2.06 and 7.29 ± 3.30 years after ACL reconstruction, respectively. Skiers earned 22 medals prior to ACL reconstruction (9 gold, 5 silver, 8 bronze) and 24 medals after ACL reconstruction (16 gold, 2 silver, 6 bronze). Snowboarders earned 7 medals prior to ACL reconstruction (4 gold, 1 silver, 2 bronze) and 19 medals after ACL reconstruction (7 gold, 7 silver, 5 bronze).

Conclusion: Winter X-Games skiers and snowboarders have a high rate of RTS after ACL reconstruction. Skiers earned a similar number of medals preinjury and postsurgery, while snowboarders earned more medals following surgery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

X-Games athlete flowchart. ACL-R, anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.
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fig1-2325967113511196: X-Games athlete flowchart. ACL-R, anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

Mentions: Snowboarders and skiers who competed in the winter X-Games and tore their ACLs and underwent ACL reconstruction between 1997 (the year of the inaugural winter X-Games) and June 1, 2012, were identified for potential inclusion (Figure 1). These participants were discovered through winter X-Games and ESPN websites, publically available Internet-based injury reports, player profiles/biographies, and press releases. This method of participant selection has been used in multiple high-evidence-level studies published in orthopaedic journals.2,6,9,12,17,18 The search was conducted by an orthopaedic surgery resident and a board-eligible orthopaedic surgeon in sports medicine fellowship training. All players who met the inclusion criteria were included in this study as it related to RTS rate. Certain concomitant knee injuries, when known, were deemed acceptable (articular cartilage injury, meniscal tear, and medial or lateral collateral ligament tear [but not both at same time]). Players were excluded if they sustained a concomitant tibial plateau fracture, a bicruciate (ACL and complete posterior cruciate ligament [PCL]) or combined ACL and bicollateral ligament injury. A player was deemed to have RTS if he or she competed in any winter X-Games event for a given season after surgery. Players did not RTS if they failed to meet any of the aforementioned criteria.


Performance and Return to Sport After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in X-Games Skiers and Snowboarders.

Erickson BJ, Harris JD, Fillingham YA, Cvetanovich GL, Bhatia S, Bach BR, Bush-Joseph CA, Cole BJ - Orthop J Sports Med (2013)

X-Games athlete flowchart. ACL-R, anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555512&req=5

fig1-2325967113511196: X-Games athlete flowchart. ACL-R, anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.
Mentions: Snowboarders and skiers who competed in the winter X-Games and tore their ACLs and underwent ACL reconstruction between 1997 (the year of the inaugural winter X-Games) and June 1, 2012, were identified for potential inclusion (Figure 1). These participants were discovered through winter X-Games and ESPN websites, publically available Internet-based injury reports, player profiles/biographies, and press releases. This method of participant selection has been used in multiple high-evidence-level studies published in orthopaedic journals.2,6,9,12,17,18 The search was conducted by an orthopaedic surgery resident and a board-eligible orthopaedic surgeon in sports medicine fellowship training. All players who met the inclusion criteria were included in this study as it related to RTS rate. Certain concomitant knee injuries, when known, were deemed acceptable (articular cartilage injury, meniscal tear, and medial or lateral collateral ligament tear [but not both at same time]). Players were excluded if they sustained a concomitant tibial plateau fracture, a bicruciate (ACL and complete posterior cruciate ligament [PCL]) or combined ACL and bicollateral ligament injury. A player was deemed to have RTS if he or she competed in any winter X-Games event for a given season after surgery. Players did not RTS if they failed to meet any of the aforementioned criteria.

Bottom Line: Fifteen skiers (19 knees) and 10 snowboarders (10 knees) were analyzed.There were 13 males and 12 females, with a mean subject age of 22.6 ± 4.45 years.Skiers earned a similar number of medals preinjury and postsurgery, while snowboarders earned more medals following surgery.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Skiing and snowboarding have become increasingly popular since the inception of the winter X-Games in 1997.

Purpose: To determine (1) rate of return to sport (RTS) to the winter X-Games following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and (2) performance upon RTS following ACL reconstruction.

Hypotheses: There is a high rate of RTS to the winter X-Games in subjects undergoing ACL reconstruction. There is no difference in performance upon RTS following ACL reconstruction versus preinjury.

Study design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4.

Methods: Skiers and snowboarders competing in the winter X-Games who tore their ACL and underwent ACL reconstruction between 1997 and 2012 were evaluated. Athlete data were extracted from winter X-Games media websites, ESPN, injury reports, player profiles/biographies, and press releases. All athlete, knee, and surgical demographic data were analyzed. RTS and performance as it related to the number of gold, silver, and bronze medals won both pre- and postoperatively in the X-Games were analyzed.

Results: Fifteen skiers (19 knees) and 10 snowboarders (10 knees) were analyzed. There were 13 males and 12 females, with a mean subject age of 22.6 ± 4.45 years. The rate of RTS in the X-Games following ACL reconstruction was 80% overall (20/25 subjects). The rate of RTS in winter X-Games following ACL reconstruction in skiers was 87% (13/15 subjects) and in snowboarders was 70% (7/10 subjects). The rate of RTS in winter X-Games following ACL reconstruction in males and females was 85% (11/13 subjects) and 75% (9/12 subjects), respectively. The rate of revision ACL reconstruction due to ACL tear following primary ACL reconstruction was 4% (1/25 subjects). There were more left- than right-sided tears (18 vs 11). Skiers and snowboarders competed in the X-Games for 3.84 ± 2.73 and 3.40 ± 2.84 years prior to ACL reconstruction and 2.56 ± 2.06 and 7.29 ± 3.30 years after ACL reconstruction, respectively. Skiers earned 22 medals prior to ACL reconstruction (9 gold, 5 silver, 8 bronze) and 24 medals after ACL reconstruction (16 gold, 2 silver, 6 bronze). Snowboarders earned 7 medals prior to ACL reconstruction (4 gold, 1 silver, 2 bronze) and 19 medals after ACL reconstruction (7 gold, 7 silver, 5 bronze).

Conclusion: Winter X-Games skiers and snowboarders have a high rate of RTS after ACL reconstruction. Skiers earned a similar number of medals preinjury and postsurgery, while snowboarders earned more medals following surgery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus