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Effect of the Common Fat Mass and Obesity Associated Gene Variants on Obesity in Pakistani Population: A Case-Control Study.

- Biomed Res Int (2015)

Bottom Line: Lipid profile was determined, tetra-ARMS PCR was used for genotyping, and allele/genotype frequencies and genescore were calculated.All FTO variants were associated with obesity, and some biochemical and anthropometric measures and had higher minor allele frequencies than those reported for Asian populations previously.The risk allele of each single nucleotide polymorphism resulted in an increase in BMI in a quantitative manner.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of the Punjab, Lahore 54590, Pakistan.

ABSTRACT

Background/objective: Obesity has become a global epidemic due to an increase in the number of obese individuals worldwide. There is little research in the field of obesity genetics in Pakistan. The aim of the current study was to analyze the association of common variants in Fat Mass and Obesity associated (FTO) gene with obesity in Pakistan, to find out the effect of the selected SNPs on anthropometric and biochemical traits, and to observe whether these variants act synergistically.

Methods: Samples from 631 subjects were taken after informed consent and were used for serum parameters and genetic analysis. Lipid profile was determined, tetra-ARMS PCR was used for genotyping, and allele/genotype frequencies and genescore were calculated.

Results: All FTO variants were associated with obesity, and some biochemical and anthropometric measures and had higher minor allele frequencies than those reported for Asian populations previously. The risk allele of each single nucleotide polymorphism resulted in an increase in BMI in a quantitative manner.

Conclusion: Common forms of obesity are due to a combined net effect of many variants presented in same or different genes. The more the number of risk alleles present, the higher the risk and severity of obesity resulting from an increase in BMI.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effect of number of risk alleles on mean BMI. Bars indicate mean BMI values with respective number of risk alleles showing an additive effect of each risk allele to increase in mean BMI value.
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fig2: Effect of number of risk alleles on mean BMI. Bars indicate mean BMI values with respective number of risk alleles showing an additive effect of each risk allele to increase in mean BMI value.

Mentions: Common forms of obesity involve a combined net effect of variants present in same or different genes [19]. To see whether this holds true for the FTO variants under study, we calculated the gene score for each individual in controls as well as cases (using 0, 1, and 2 coding for no, one, and two risk alleles) and plotted it for normal distribution in both groups (Figure 1). Independent sample t-test results showed a significance difference of mean gene score between cases and controls (2.99 ± 1.36 in cases versus 2.25 ± 1.25 in controls, p = 3.16 × 10−9). In control group maximum individuals had a low number of risk alleles while in the obese group majority of subjects had a higher number of risk alleles. The normal distribution curve was shifted towards higher number of risk alleles in cases. The effect of the number of risk alleles on BMI was evaluated by plotting it against mean BMI. Mean BMI rather than exact values was used to get a more reliable plot as BMI varies with individuals, but mean value is a rather constant measure. Mean BMI appeared to increase as the number of risk alleles increases indicating the quantitative contribution of each allele to BMI increase (Figure 2). The same effect was observed when relationship of risk score and BMI was analyzed. The control population had 17% higher GRS while cases had 47.89% higher GRS as compared to the average population risk.


Effect of the Common Fat Mass and Obesity Associated Gene Variants on Obesity in Pakistani Population: A Case-Control Study.

- Biomed Res Int (2015)

Effect of number of risk alleles on mean BMI. Bars indicate mean BMI values with respective number of risk alleles showing an additive effect of each risk allele to increase in mean BMI value.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555445&req=5

fig2: Effect of number of risk alleles on mean BMI. Bars indicate mean BMI values with respective number of risk alleles showing an additive effect of each risk allele to increase in mean BMI value.
Mentions: Common forms of obesity involve a combined net effect of variants present in same or different genes [19]. To see whether this holds true for the FTO variants under study, we calculated the gene score for each individual in controls as well as cases (using 0, 1, and 2 coding for no, one, and two risk alleles) and plotted it for normal distribution in both groups (Figure 1). Independent sample t-test results showed a significance difference of mean gene score between cases and controls (2.99 ± 1.36 in cases versus 2.25 ± 1.25 in controls, p = 3.16 × 10−9). In control group maximum individuals had a low number of risk alleles while in the obese group majority of subjects had a higher number of risk alleles. The normal distribution curve was shifted towards higher number of risk alleles in cases. The effect of the number of risk alleles on BMI was evaluated by plotting it against mean BMI. Mean BMI rather than exact values was used to get a more reliable plot as BMI varies with individuals, but mean value is a rather constant measure. Mean BMI appeared to increase as the number of risk alleles increases indicating the quantitative contribution of each allele to BMI increase (Figure 2). The same effect was observed when relationship of risk score and BMI was analyzed. The control population had 17% higher GRS while cases had 47.89% higher GRS as compared to the average population risk.

Bottom Line: Lipid profile was determined, tetra-ARMS PCR was used for genotyping, and allele/genotype frequencies and genescore were calculated.All FTO variants were associated with obesity, and some biochemical and anthropometric measures and had higher minor allele frequencies than those reported for Asian populations previously.The risk allele of each single nucleotide polymorphism resulted in an increase in BMI in a quantitative manner.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of the Punjab, Lahore 54590, Pakistan.

ABSTRACT

Background/objective: Obesity has become a global epidemic due to an increase in the number of obese individuals worldwide. There is little research in the field of obesity genetics in Pakistan. The aim of the current study was to analyze the association of common variants in Fat Mass and Obesity associated (FTO) gene with obesity in Pakistan, to find out the effect of the selected SNPs on anthropometric and biochemical traits, and to observe whether these variants act synergistically.

Methods: Samples from 631 subjects were taken after informed consent and were used for serum parameters and genetic analysis. Lipid profile was determined, tetra-ARMS PCR was used for genotyping, and allele/genotype frequencies and genescore were calculated.

Results: All FTO variants were associated with obesity, and some biochemical and anthropometric measures and had higher minor allele frequencies than those reported for Asian populations previously. The risk allele of each single nucleotide polymorphism resulted in an increase in BMI in a quantitative manner.

Conclusion: Common forms of obesity are due to a combined net effect of many variants presented in same or different genes. The more the number of risk alleles present, the higher the risk and severity of obesity resulting from an increase in BMI.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus