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Characterization of the Bacterial Community Naturally Present on Commercially Grown Basil Leaves: Evaluation of Sample Preparation Prior to Culture-Independent Techniques.

Ceuppens S, Delbeke S, De Coninck D, Boussemaere J, Boon N, Uyttendaele M - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: Basil provides considerable culinary and health benefits, but has also been implicated in foodborne illnesses.Sample preparation had a major influence on the results from DGGE and NGS: Novosphingobium was the dominant genus for three different basil batches obtained by maceration of basil leaves, while washing of the leaves yielded lower numbers but more variable dominant bacterial genera including Klebsiella, Pantoea, Flavobacterium, Sphingobacterium and Pseudomonas.Spoilage was not associated with specific bacterial groups and presumably caused by physiological tissue deterioration and visual defects, rather than by bacterial growth.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Department of Food Safety and Food Quality, Laboratory of Food Microbiology and Food Preservation (LFMFP), Ghent University, Ghent 9000, Belgium. siele.ceuppens@ugent.be.

ABSTRACT
Fresh herbs such as basil constitute an important food commodity worldwide. Basil provides considerable culinary and health benefits, but has also been implicated in foodborne illnesses. The naturally occurring bacterial community on basil leaves is currently unknown, so the epiphytic bacterial community was investigated using the culture-independent techniques denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and next-generation sequencing (NGS). Sample preparation had a major influence on the results from DGGE and NGS: Novosphingobium was the dominant genus for three different basil batches obtained by maceration of basil leaves, while washing of the leaves yielded lower numbers but more variable dominant bacterial genera including Klebsiella, Pantoea, Flavobacterium, Sphingobacterium and Pseudomonas. During storage of basil, bacterial growth and shifts in the bacterial community were observed with DGGE and NGS. Spoilage was not associated with specific bacterial groups and presumably caused by physiological tissue deterioration and visual defects, rather than by bacterial growth.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) patterns of bacterial communities on basil leaves from batch IV and batch V stored at 7 °C, 15 °C and 22 °C for 14 days.
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ijerph-12-10171-f005: Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) patterns of bacterial communities on basil leaves from batch IV and batch V stored at 7 °C, 15 °C and 22 °C for 14 days.

Mentions: DGGE patterns of basil samples clustered into one heavily spoiled group of basil IV and a group of non-spoiled or at the limit of spoilage with score 5 (Figure 5). The latter was in turn divided into a group of basil IV samples and basil V, with the only exception of two basil IV samples (stored 14 days at 7 °C and 7 days at 15 °C), which were more similar to the other basil batch. Spoilage is thus associated with numerical increases and compositional changes in the bacterial community detectable by DGGE. However, the colonies from the total plate counts were also subjected to DGGE analysis, but no meaningful clustering was observed (data not shown).


Characterization of the Bacterial Community Naturally Present on Commercially Grown Basil Leaves: Evaluation of Sample Preparation Prior to Culture-Independent Techniques.

Ceuppens S, Delbeke S, De Coninck D, Boussemaere J, Boon N, Uyttendaele M - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) patterns of bacterial communities on basil leaves from batch IV and batch V stored at 7 °C, 15 °C and 22 °C for 14 days.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555336&req=5

ijerph-12-10171-f005: Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) patterns of bacterial communities on basil leaves from batch IV and batch V stored at 7 °C, 15 °C and 22 °C for 14 days.
Mentions: DGGE patterns of basil samples clustered into one heavily spoiled group of basil IV and a group of non-spoiled or at the limit of spoilage with score 5 (Figure 5). The latter was in turn divided into a group of basil IV samples and basil V, with the only exception of two basil IV samples (stored 14 days at 7 °C and 7 days at 15 °C), which were more similar to the other basil batch. Spoilage is thus associated with numerical increases and compositional changes in the bacterial community detectable by DGGE. However, the colonies from the total plate counts were also subjected to DGGE analysis, but no meaningful clustering was observed (data not shown).

Bottom Line: Basil provides considerable culinary and health benefits, but has also been implicated in foodborne illnesses.Sample preparation had a major influence on the results from DGGE and NGS: Novosphingobium was the dominant genus for three different basil batches obtained by maceration of basil leaves, while washing of the leaves yielded lower numbers but more variable dominant bacterial genera including Klebsiella, Pantoea, Flavobacterium, Sphingobacterium and Pseudomonas.Spoilage was not associated with specific bacterial groups and presumably caused by physiological tissue deterioration and visual defects, rather than by bacterial growth.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Department of Food Safety and Food Quality, Laboratory of Food Microbiology and Food Preservation (LFMFP), Ghent University, Ghent 9000, Belgium. siele.ceuppens@ugent.be.

ABSTRACT
Fresh herbs such as basil constitute an important food commodity worldwide. Basil provides considerable culinary and health benefits, but has also been implicated in foodborne illnesses. The naturally occurring bacterial community on basil leaves is currently unknown, so the epiphytic bacterial community was investigated using the culture-independent techniques denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and next-generation sequencing (NGS). Sample preparation had a major influence on the results from DGGE and NGS: Novosphingobium was the dominant genus for three different basil batches obtained by maceration of basil leaves, while washing of the leaves yielded lower numbers but more variable dominant bacterial genera including Klebsiella, Pantoea, Flavobacterium, Sphingobacterium and Pseudomonas. During storage of basil, bacterial growth and shifts in the bacterial community were observed with DGGE and NGS. Spoilage was not associated with specific bacterial groups and presumably caused by physiological tissue deterioration and visual defects, rather than by bacterial growth.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus