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Older People's Perceptions of Pedestrian Friendliness and Traffic Safety: An Experiment Using Computer-Simulated Walking Environments.

Kahlert D, Schlicht W - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: A multivariate analysis of covariance showed that subjects' ratings on perceived traffic safety and pedestrian friendliness were higher for Version 'B' compared to version 'A'.Cohen's d indicates medium (d = 0.73) and large (d = 1.23) effect sizes for traffic safety and pedestrian friendliness, respectively.The study suggests that elements of the built environment might affect motivational antecedents of older people's walking behavior.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Exercise and Health Science, Stuttgart Research Initiative Human Factors in Ageing, Technology, and Environment, University of Stuttgart, Nobelstr. 15, Stuttgart 70569, Germany. daniela.kahlert@inspo.uni-stuttgart.de.

ABSTRACT
Traffic safety and pedestrian friendliness are considered to be important conditions for older people's motivation to walk through their environment. This study uses an experimental study design with computer-simulated living environments to investigate the effect of micro-scale environmental factors (parking spaces and green verges with trees) on older people's perceptions of both motivational antecedents (dependent variables). Seventy-four consecutively recruited older people were randomly assigned watching one of two scenarios (independent variable) on a computer screen. The scenarios simulated a stroll on a sidewalk, as it is 'typical' for a German city. In version 'A,' the subjects take a fictive walk on a sidewalk where a number of cars are parked partially on it. In version 'B', cars are in parking spaces separated from the sidewalk by grass verges and trees. Subjects assessed their impressions of both dependent variables. A multivariate analysis of covariance showed that subjects' ratings on perceived traffic safety and pedestrian friendliness were higher for Version 'B' compared to version 'A'. Cohen's d indicates medium (d = 0.73) and large (d = 1.23) effect sizes for traffic safety and pedestrian friendliness, respectively. The study suggests that elements of the built environment might affect motivational antecedents of older people's walking behavior.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Example of the same route section in Version A and Version B of the computer simulated living environment.
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ijerph-12-10066-f001: Example of the same route section in Version A and Version B of the computer simulated living environment.

Mentions: Both videos showed a stroll through a living environment in a typical German city. Depending on their randomized assignment, each subject saw either Version A or B of the video. Both show the same walking route, but Version A depicts a typical city and living environment in which (some) cars are parked such that they partially cover the sidewalk, whereas version B depicts a living environment in which cars are parked in parking spaces adjacent to the sidewalk and a grass verge with trees is between the sidewalk and the parking spaces (see Figure 1). No other features differentiate the environments shown in the two videos. For instance, the number of cars, sidewalk width and number of fictitious pedestrians are the same.


Older People's Perceptions of Pedestrian Friendliness and Traffic Safety: An Experiment Using Computer-Simulated Walking Environments.

Kahlert D, Schlicht W - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Example of the same route section in Version A and Version B of the computer simulated living environment.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555329&req=5

ijerph-12-10066-f001: Example of the same route section in Version A and Version B of the computer simulated living environment.
Mentions: Both videos showed a stroll through a living environment in a typical German city. Depending on their randomized assignment, each subject saw either Version A or B of the video. Both show the same walking route, but Version A depicts a typical city and living environment in which (some) cars are parked such that they partially cover the sidewalk, whereas version B depicts a living environment in which cars are parked in parking spaces adjacent to the sidewalk and a grass verge with trees is between the sidewalk and the parking spaces (see Figure 1). No other features differentiate the environments shown in the two videos. For instance, the number of cars, sidewalk width and number of fictitious pedestrians are the same.

Bottom Line: A multivariate analysis of covariance showed that subjects' ratings on perceived traffic safety and pedestrian friendliness were higher for Version 'B' compared to version 'A'.Cohen's d indicates medium (d = 0.73) and large (d = 1.23) effect sizes for traffic safety and pedestrian friendliness, respectively.The study suggests that elements of the built environment might affect motivational antecedents of older people's walking behavior.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Exercise and Health Science, Stuttgart Research Initiative Human Factors in Ageing, Technology, and Environment, University of Stuttgart, Nobelstr. 15, Stuttgart 70569, Germany. daniela.kahlert@inspo.uni-stuttgart.de.

ABSTRACT
Traffic safety and pedestrian friendliness are considered to be important conditions for older people's motivation to walk through their environment. This study uses an experimental study design with computer-simulated living environments to investigate the effect of micro-scale environmental factors (parking spaces and green verges with trees) on older people's perceptions of both motivational antecedents (dependent variables). Seventy-four consecutively recruited older people were randomly assigned watching one of two scenarios (independent variable) on a computer screen. The scenarios simulated a stroll on a sidewalk, as it is 'typical' for a German city. In version 'A,' the subjects take a fictive walk on a sidewalk where a number of cars are parked partially on it. In version 'B', cars are in parking spaces separated from the sidewalk by grass verges and trees. Subjects assessed their impressions of both dependent variables. A multivariate analysis of covariance showed that subjects' ratings on perceived traffic safety and pedestrian friendliness were higher for Version 'B' compared to version 'A'. Cohen's d indicates medium (d = 0.73) and large (d = 1.23) effect sizes for traffic safety and pedestrian friendliness, respectively. The study suggests that elements of the built environment might affect motivational antecedents of older people's walking behavior.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus