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An IBCLC in the Maternity Ward of a Mother and Child Hospital: A Pre- and Post-Intervention Study.

Chiurco A, Montico M, Brovedani P, Monasta L, Davanzo R - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: Our study aims at evaluating the effects of adding an IBCLC for breastfeeding support in a mother and child hospital environment.In Phase III, a significantly higher percentage of mothers: (a) received help to breastfeed, and also received correct information on breastfeeding and community support, (b) started breastfeeding within two hours from delivery, (c) reported a good experience with the hospital staff.However, no difference was found in exclusive breastfeeding rates at hospital discharge or at two weeks after birth.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Neonatology and NICU, Institute for Maternal and Child Health-IRCCS "Burlo Garofolo", Trieste, TS-34137, Italy. ant.chiurco@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Published evidence on the impact of the integration of International Board Certified Lactation Consultants (IBCLCs) for breastfeeding promotion is growing, but still relatively limited. Our study aims at evaluating the effects of adding an IBCLC for breastfeeding support in a mother and child hospital environment. We conducted a prospective study in the maternity ward of our maternal and child health Institute, recruiting 402 mothers of healthy term newborns soon after birth. The 18-month intervention of the IBCLC (Phase II) was preceded (Phase I) by data collection on breastfeeding rates and factors related to breastfeeding, both at hospital discharge and two weeks later. Data collection was replicated just before the end of the intervention (Phase III). In Phase III, a significantly higher percentage of mothers: (a) received help to breastfeed, and also received correct information on breastfeeding and community support, (b) started breastfeeding within two hours from delivery, (c) reported a good experience with the hospital staff. Moreover, the frequency of sore and/or cracked nipples was significantly lower in Phase III. However, no difference was found in exclusive breastfeeding rates at hospital discharge or at two weeks after birth.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Percentage of women who received help with breastfeeding from hospital staff and or IBCLC.
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ijerph-12-09938-f001: Percentage of women who received help with breastfeeding from hospital staff and or IBCLC.

Mentions: The overall proportion of women who stated they received significant help with breastfeeding increased from 60% to 93% (p < 0.001) (Figure 1). In particular, the proportion of women who received help from the hospital staff increased, but not significantly (alone or together with IBCLC 60% vs. 71%, p = 0.09), while an additional 22% of women in the Phase III group received help only from the IBCLC.


An IBCLC in the Maternity Ward of a Mother and Child Hospital: A Pre- and Post-Intervention Study.

Chiurco A, Montico M, Brovedani P, Monasta L, Davanzo R - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Percentage of women who received help with breastfeeding from hospital staff and or IBCLC.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555321&req=5

ijerph-12-09938-f001: Percentage of women who received help with breastfeeding from hospital staff and or IBCLC.
Mentions: The overall proportion of women who stated they received significant help with breastfeeding increased from 60% to 93% (p < 0.001) (Figure 1). In particular, the proportion of women who received help from the hospital staff increased, but not significantly (alone or together with IBCLC 60% vs. 71%, p = 0.09), while an additional 22% of women in the Phase III group received help only from the IBCLC.

Bottom Line: Our study aims at evaluating the effects of adding an IBCLC for breastfeeding support in a mother and child hospital environment.In Phase III, a significantly higher percentage of mothers: (a) received help to breastfeed, and also received correct information on breastfeeding and community support, (b) started breastfeeding within two hours from delivery, (c) reported a good experience with the hospital staff.However, no difference was found in exclusive breastfeeding rates at hospital discharge or at two weeks after birth.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Neonatology and NICU, Institute for Maternal and Child Health-IRCCS "Burlo Garofolo", Trieste, TS-34137, Italy. ant.chiurco@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Published evidence on the impact of the integration of International Board Certified Lactation Consultants (IBCLCs) for breastfeeding promotion is growing, but still relatively limited. Our study aims at evaluating the effects of adding an IBCLC for breastfeeding support in a mother and child hospital environment. We conducted a prospective study in the maternity ward of our maternal and child health Institute, recruiting 402 mothers of healthy term newborns soon after birth. The 18-month intervention of the IBCLC (Phase II) was preceded (Phase I) by data collection on breastfeeding rates and factors related to breastfeeding, both at hospital discharge and two weeks later. Data collection was replicated just before the end of the intervention (Phase III). In Phase III, a significantly higher percentage of mothers: (a) received help to breastfeed, and also received correct information on breastfeeding and community support, (b) started breastfeeding within two hours from delivery, (c) reported a good experience with the hospital staff. Moreover, the frequency of sore and/or cracked nipples was significantly lower in Phase III. However, no difference was found in exclusive breastfeeding rates at hospital discharge or at two weeks after birth.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus