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Biosurfactant Production by Bacillus salmalaya for Lubricating Oil Solubilization and Biodegradation.

Dadrasnia A, Ismail S - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: The biosurfactant exhibited a high emulsification index and a positive result in the drop collapse test, with the results demonstrating the wetting activity of the biosurfactant and its potential to produce surface-active molecules.Furthermore, the biosurfactant demonstrated high stability at different ranges of salinity, pH, and temperature.Overall, the results indicated the potential use of B. salmalaya 139SI in environmental remediation processes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biohealth Science, Institute of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603, Malaysia. are.dadrasnia@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
This study investigated the capability of a biosurfactant produced by a novel strain of Bacillus salmalaya to enhance the biodegradation rates and bioavailability of organic contaminants. The biosurfactant produced by cultured strain 139SI showed high physicochemical properties and surface activity in the selected medium. The biosurfactant exhibited a high emulsification index and a positive result in the drop collapse test, with the results demonstrating the wetting activity of the biosurfactant and its potential to produce surface-active molecules. Strain 139SI can significantly reduce the surface tension (ST) from 70.5 to 27 mN/m, with a critical micelle concentration of 0.4%. Moreover, lubricating oil at 2% (v/v) was degraded on Day 20 (71.5). Furthermore, the biosurfactant demonstrated high stability at different ranges of salinity, pH, and temperature. Overall, the results indicated the potential use of B. salmalaya 139SI in environmental remediation processes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Changes in ST, biodegradation rate and strain growth during 24 days. Vertical bars indicate SE (n = 3).
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ijerph-12-09848-f006: Changes in ST, biodegradation rate and strain growth during 24 days. Vertical bars indicate SE (n = 3).

Mentions: The potential of B. salmalaya 139SI to utilize lubricating oil (2% v/v) as a source of energy and carbon was investigated for 24 days. Cultures were incubated at 35 °C, and samples were collected every four days to monitor the rates of oil degradation, microbial population, and ST. As shown in Figure 6, the strain was able to grow with 2% oil. The rate of oil degradation was determined via a gravimetric method, and the results illustrated that 19.6% of the oil was degraded during the first four days, with the maximum rate of degradation of 72.6% on Day 24 (Figure 6). After 20 days of incubation, the rate of oil degradation remained constant. The number of colony-forming units increased up to Day 16 (3.6 × 106), followed by a decrease until the end of the experiment; the value was up to 2.6 × 106 on Day 24. The biosynthesis of the biosurfactant was determined by measuring ST. The amount of ST slowly decreased from 70.1 mN/m on Day 0 to 52.6 mN/m on Day 12, and the maximum reduction was observed on Day 20, reaching 37.4 mN/m. Many studies have reported the ability of microbial surfactants to degrade hydrocarbons. In our previous study, we reported the potential of B. salmalaya 139SI for use in the bioremediation of crude oil waste [3,12]. Ayed et al., [2] reported that the biodegradation of diesel oil was enhanced by the addition of B. amyloliquefaciens An6 compared with an anionic surfactant and Tween 80. Therefore, decreasing ST with the addition of a biosurfactant at the water-air interface enhances and improves solubility, thereby reducing the partitioning of organic carbons from the oil phase into aqueous solution.


Biosurfactant Production by Bacillus salmalaya for Lubricating Oil Solubilization and Biodegradation.

Dadrasnia A, Ismail S - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Changes in ST, biodegradation rate and strain growth during 24 days. Vertical bars indicate SE (n = 3).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555315&req=5

ijerph-12-09848-f006: Changes in ST, biodegradation rate and strain growth during 24 days. Vertical bars indicate SE (n = 3).
Mentions: The potential of B. salmalaya 139SI to utilize lubricating oil (2% v/v) as a source of energy and carbon was investigated for 24 days. Cultures were incubated at 35 °C, and samples were collected every four days to monitor the rates of oil degradation, microbial population, and ST. As shown in Figure 6, the strain was able to grow with 2% oil. The rate of oil degradation was determined via a gravimetric method, and the results illustrated that 19.6% of the oil was degraded during the first four days, with the maximum rate of degradation of 72.6% on Day 24 (Figure 6). After 20 days of incubation, the rate of oil degradation remained constant. The number of colony-forming units increased up to Day 16 (3.6 × 106), followed by a decrease until the end of the experiment; the value was up to 2.6 × 106 on Day 24. The biosynthesis of the biosurfactant was determined by measuring ST. The amount of ST slowly decreased from 70.1 mN/m on Day 0 to 52.6 mN/m on Day 12, and the maximum reduction was observed on Day 20, reaching 37.4 mN/m. Many studies have reported the ability of microbial surfactants to degrade hydrocarbons. In our previous study, we reported the potential of B. salmalaya 139SI for use in the bioremediation of crude oil waste [3,12]. Ayed et al., [2] reported that the biodegradation of diesel oil was enhanced by the addition of B. amyloliquefaciens An6 compared with an anionic surfactant and Tween 80. Therefore, decreasing ST with the addition of a biosurfactant at the water-air interface enhances and improves solubility, thereby reducing the partitioning of organic carbons from the oil phase into aqueous solution.

Bottom Line: The biosurfactant exhibited a high emulsification index and a positive result in the drop collapse test, with the results demonstrating the wetting activity of the biosurfactant and its potential to produce surface-active molecules.Furthermore, the biosurfactant demonstrated high stability at different ranges of salinity, pH, and temperature.Overall, the results indicated the potential use of B. salmalaya 139SI in environmental remediation processes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biohealth Science, Institute of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603, Malaysia. are.dadrasnia@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
This study investigated the capability of a biosurfactant produced by a novel strain of Bacillus salmalaya to enhance the biodegradation rates and bioavailability of organic contaminants. The biosurfactant produced by cultured strain 139SI showed high physicochemical properties and surface activity in the selected medium. The biosurfactant exhibited a high emulsification index and a positive result in the drop collapse test, with the results demonstrating the wetting activity of the biosurfactant and its potential to produce surface-active molecules. Strain 139SI can significantly reduce the surface tension (ST) from 70.5 to 27 mN/m, with a critical micelle concentration of 0.4%. Moreover, lubricating oil at 2% (v/v) was degraded on Day 20 (71.5). Furthermore, the biosurfactant demonstrated high stability at different ranges of salinity, pH, and temperature. Overall, the results indicated the potential use of B. salmalaya 139SI in environmental remediation processes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus