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The Effects of Lead Exposure on Serum Uric Acid and Hyperuricemia in Chinese Adults: A Cross-Sectional Study.

Dai H, Huang Z, Deng Q, Li Y, Xiao T, Ning X, Lu Y, Yuan H - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 2120 subjects (1180 of whom were male) between the ages of 20 and 75 years who had undergone health examinations at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in a lead-polluted area of China between January 2013 and August 2014.After multiple adjustments, blood lead was significantly associated with a higher prevalence of hyperuricemia when female subjects were categorized into quartiles (for the highest quartile vs. the lowest quartile, odds ratio (OR) = 2.190; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.106-4.338; p = 0.025); however, no such association was observed for male subjects.Lead exposure is significantly associated with hyperuricemia for females but not for males.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Third Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410013, China. daihaijiang1217@163.com.

ABSTRACT
The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between blood lead levels and both serum uric acid and hyperuricemia in adult residents living within an area of China with lead pollution. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 2120 subjects (1180 of whom were male) between the ages of 20 and 75 years who had undergone health examinations at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in a lead-polluted area of China between January 2013 and August 2014. Blood lead was positively correlated with serum uric acid in both males (r = 0.095, p = 0.001) and females (r = 0.134, p < 0.001). Multivariate linear regression analysis demonstrated that for males, blood lead (p = 0.006), age (p = 0.001), current smoking (p = 0.012), education (p = 0.001), triglycerides (TG) (p < 0.001), and serum creatinine (p < 0.001) were independently associated with serum uric acid. For females, blood lead (p < 0.001), body mass index (BMI) (p = 0.009), and TG (p < 0.001) were independently associated with serum uric acid. After multiple adjustments, blood lead was significantly associated with a higher prevalence of hyperuricemia when female subjects were categorized into quartiles (for the highest quartile vs. the lowest quartile, odds ratio (OR) = 2.190; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.106-4.338; p = 0.025); however, no such association was observed for male subjects. Continuous lead exposure has an independent impact on serum uric acid for both males and females, although this impact is more pronounced for females than for males. Lead exposure is significantly associated with hyperuricemia for females but not for males.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Unadjusted prevalences of hyperuricemia by blood lead quartiles for males and females. ap values determined by chi-square tests across the four quartiles.
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ijerph-12-09672-f001: Unadjusted prevalences of hyperuricemia by blood lead quartiles for males and females. ap values determined by chi-square tests across the four quartiles.

Mentions: When we assessed the association between blood lead levels and hyperuricemia as a categorical variable, we found that significant association between blood lead quartiles and unadjusted prevalence of hyperuricemia only in females (p = 0.027, Figure 1). In a multiple logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, BMI, current smoking, drinking, and education (Table 4; model 2), blood lead levels were positively associated with a higher prevalence of hyperuricemia when categorized in quartiles (the highest vs. the lowest quartile; OR, 2.249; 95% CI, 1.151–4.394; p = 0.018) in females. Further adjusting model 2 for SBP, DBP, fasting glucose, TC, TG, HDL-C, serum creatinine, BUN (Table 4; model 3), blood lead levels were still positively associated with a higher prevalence of hyperuricemia (the highest vs. the lowest quartile; OR, 2.190; 95% CI, 1.106–4.338; p = 0.025). However, there was no significant association between blood lead levels and the prevalence of hyperuricemia in males.


The Effects of Lead Exposure on Serum Uric Acid and Hyperuricemia in Chinese Adults: A Cross-Sectional Study.

Dai H, Huang Z, Deng Q, Li Y, Xiao T, Ning X, Lu Y, Yuan H - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Unadjusted prevalences of hyperuricemia by blood lead quartiles for males and females. ap values determined by chi-square tests across the four quartiles.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555305&req=5

ijerph-12-09672-f001: Unadjusted prevalences of hyperuricemia by blood lead quartiles for males and females. ap values determined by chi-square tests across the four quartiles.
Mentions: When we assessed the association between blood lead levels and hyperuricemia as a categorical variable, we found that significant association between blood lead quartiles and unadjusted prevalence of hyperuricemia only in females (p = 0.027, Figure 1). In a multiple logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, BMI, current smoking, drinking, and education (Table 4; model 2), blood lead levels were positively associated with a higher prevalence of hyperuricemia when categorized in quartiles (the highest vs. the lowest quartile; OR, 2.249; 95% CI, 1.151–4.394; p = 0.018) in females. Further adjusting model 2 for SBP, DBP, fasting glucose, TC, TG, HDL-C, serum creatinine, BUN (Table 4; model 3), blood lead levels were still positively associated with a higher prevalence of hyperuricemia (the highest vs. the lowest quartile; OR, 2.190; 95% CI, 1.106–4.338; p = 0.025). However, there was no significant association between blood lead levels and the prevalence of hyperuricemia in males.

Bottom Line: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 2120 subjects (1180 of whom were male) between the ages of 20 and 75 years who had undergone health examinations at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in a lead-polluted area of China between January 2013 and August 2014.After multiple adjustments, blood lead was significantly associated with a higher prevalence of hyperuricemia when female subjects were categorized into quartiles (for the highest quartile vs. the lowest quartile, odds ratio (OR) = 2.190; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.106-4.338; p = 0.025); however, no such association was observed for male subjects.Lead exposure is significantly associated with hyperuricemia for females but not for males.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Third Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410013, China. daihaijiang1217@163.com.

ABSTRACT
The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between blood lead levels and both serum uric acid and hyperuricemia in adult residents living within an area of China with lead pollution. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 2120 subjects (1180 of whom were male) between the ages of 20 and 75 years who had undergone health examinations at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in a lead-polluted area of China between January 2013 and August 2014. Blood lead was positively correlated with serum uric acid in both males (r = 0.095, p = 0.001) and females (r = 0.134, p < 0.001). Multivariate linear regression analysis demonstrated that for males, blood lead (p = 0.006), age (p = 0.001), current smoking (p = 0.012), education (p = 0.001), triglycerides (TG) (p < 0.001), and serum creatinine (p < 0.001) were independently associated with serum uric acid. For females, blood lead (p < 0.001), body mass index (BMI) (p = 0.009), and TG (p < 0.001) were independently associated with serum uric acid. After multiple adjustments, blood lead was significantly associated with a higher prevalence of hyperuricemia when female subjects were categorized into quartiles (for the highest quartile vs. the lowest quartile, odds ratio (OR) = 2.190; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.106-4.338; p = 0.025); however, no such association was observed for male subjects. Continuous lead exposure has an independent impact on serum uric acid for both males and females, although this impact is more pronounced for females than for males. Lead exposure is significantly associated with hyperuricemia for females but not for males.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus