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Seasonal Variation and Sources of Dissolved Nutrients in the Yellow River, China.

Gong Y, Yu Z, Yao Q, Chen H, Mi T, Tan J - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: Nutrient concentrations exhibited substantial seasonal and yearly variations.The relative contributions of nutrient inputs to nitrogen in the YR were: wastewater > fertilizer > atmospheric deposition > soil; while to phosphorus were: wastewater > fertilizer > soil > atmospheric deposition.The ratios of N, P and Si suggest that the YR at Lijin is strongly P-limited with respect to potential phytoplankton growth.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100, China. gongyaohh@163.com.

ABSTRACT
The rapid growth of the economy in China has caused dramatic growth in the industrial and agricultural development in the Yellow River (YR) watershed. The hydrology of the YR has changed dramatically due to the climate changes and water management practices, which have resulted in a great variation in the fluxes of riverine nutrients carried by the YR. To study these changes dissolved nutrients in the YR were measured monthly at Lijin station in the downstream region of the YR from 2002 to 2004. This study provides detailed information on the nutrient status for the relevant studies in the lower YR and the Bohai Sea. The YR was enriched in nitrate (average 314 μmol·L(-1)) with a lower concentration of dissolved silicate (average 131 μmol·L(-1)) and relatively low dissolved phosphate (average 0.35 μmol·L(-1)). Nutrient concentrations exhibited substantial seasonal and yearly variations. The annual fluxes of dissolved inorganic nitrogen, phosphate, and silicate in 2004 were 5.3, 2.5, and 4.2 times those in 2002, respectively, primarily due to the increase in river discharge. The relative contributions of nutrient inputs to nitrogen in the YR were: wastewater > fertilizer > atmospheric deposition > soil; while to phosphorus were: wastewater > fertilizer > soil > atmospheric deposition. The ratios of N, P and Si suggest that the YR at Lijin is strongly P-limited with respect to potential phytoplankton growth.

No MeSH data available.


Monthly nutrient fluxes in the Yellow River from 2002 to 2004.
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ijerph-12-09603-f004: Monthly nutrient fluxes in the Yellow River from 2002 to 2004.

Mentions: Estimated nutrient fluxes for 2002, 2003, and 2004 are shown in Table 3 and Figure 4 with large annual variations. In general, in 2003 and 2004 individual nutrient fluxes were substantially larger than in 2002. The flux of DIN in 2004 was 5.4 times that of 2002 with NO3−-N constituting the majority (~95%) of DIN. Increases in the fluxes of NO3−-N and SiO32−-Si paralleled discharge, which in 2004 was 4.7 times that of 2002. Fluxes of DSi, DIP and nitrate were strongly correlated with discharge, in particular for DSi, DIP and NO3−-N and to a lesser extent NH4+-N, generally increased with flow, while the flux of NO2−-N, albeit highly variable at low flow, generally decreased with increasing flow (Figure 5, R2 = 0.98 for DSi, R2 = 0.92 for DIP, R2 = 0.98 for nitrate).


Seasonal Variation and Sources of Dissolved Nutrients in the Yellow River, China.

Gong Y, Yu Z, Yao Q, Chen H, Mi T, Tan J - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Monthly nutrient fluxes in the Yellow River from 2002 to 2004.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555301&req=5

ijerph-12-09603-f004: Monthly nutrient fluxes in the Yellow River from 2002 to 2004.
Mentions: Estimated nutrient fluxes for 2002, 2003, and 2004 are shown in Table 3 and Figure 4 with large annual variations. In general, in 2003 and 2004 individual nutrient fluxes were substantially larger than in 2002. The flux of DIN in 2004 was 5.4 times that of 2002 with NO3−-N constituting the majority (~95%) of DIN. Increases in the fluxes of NO3−-N and SiO32−-Si paralleled discharge, which in 2004 was 4.7 times that of 2002. Fluxes of DSi, DIP and nitrate were strongly correlated with discharge, in particular for DSi, DIP and NO3−-N and to a lesser extent NH4+-N, generally increased with flow, while the flux of NO2−-N, albeit highly variable at low flow, generally decreased with increasing flow (Figure 5, R2 = 0.98 for DSi, R2 = 0.92 for DIP, R2 = 0.98 for nitrate).

Bottom Line: Nutrient concentrations exhibited substantial seasonal and yearly variations.The relative contributions of nutrient inputs to nitrogen in the YR were: wastewater > fertilizer > atmospheric deposition > soil; while to phosphorus were: wastewater > fertilizer > soil > atmospheric deposition.The ratios of N, P and Si suggest that the YR at Lijin is strongly P-limited with respect to potential phytoplankton growth.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100, China. gongyaohh@163.com.

ABSTRACT
The rapid growth of the economy in China has caused dramatic growth in the industrial and agricultural development in the Yellow River (YR) watershed. The hydrology of the YR has changed dramatically due to the climate changes and water management practices, which have resulted in a great variation in the fluxes of riverine nutrients carried by the YR. To study these changes dissolved nutrients in the YR were measured monthly at Lijin station in the downstream region of the YR from 2002 to 2004. This study provides detailed information on the nutrient status for the relevant studies in the lower YR and the Bohai Sea. The YR was enriched in nitrate (average 314 μmol·L(-1)) with a lower concentration of dissolved silicate (average 131 μmol·L(-1)) and relatively low dissolved phosphate (average 0.35 μmol·L(-1)). Nutrient concentrations exhibited substantial seasonal and yearly variations. The annual fluxes of dissolved inorganic nitrogen, phosphate, and silicate in 2004 were 5.3, 2.5, and 4.2 times those in 2002, respectively, primarily due to the increase in river discharge. The relative contributions of nutrient inputs to nitrogen in the YR were: wastewater > fertilizer > atmospheric deposition > soil; while to phosphorus were: wastewater > fertilizer > soil > atmospheric deposition. The ratios of N, P and Si suggest that the YR at Lijin is strongly P-limited with respect to potential phytoplankton growth.

No MeSH data available.