Limits...
Estimating the Smoking Ban Effects on Smoking Prevalence, Quitting and Cigarette Consumption in a Population Study of Apprentices in Italy.

Pieroni L, Muzi G, Quercia A, Lanari D, Rundo C, Minelli L, Salmasi L, dell'Omo M - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: We evaluated the effects of the Italian 2005 smoking ban in public places on the prevalence of smoking, quitting and cigarette consumption of young workers.It is estimated that the Italian smoking ban generally had no effect on smoking prevalence, quitting ratio, or cigarette consumption of apprentices.However, when the estimates were applied to subpopulations, significant effects were found: -1% in smoking prevalence, +2% in quitting, and -3% in smoking intensity of apprentices with at least a diploma.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Political Science, University of Perugia, via Pascoli 20, 06123 Perugia, Italy. luca.pieroni@unipg.it.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: We evaluated the effects of the Italian 2005 smoking ban in public places on the prevalence of smoking, quitting and cigarette consumption of young workers.

Data and methods: The dataset was obtained from non-computerized registers of medical examinations for a population of workers with apprenticeship contracts residing in the province of Viterbo, Italy, in the period 1996-2007. To estimate the effects of the ban, a segmented regression approach was used, exploiting the discontinuity introduced by the application of the law on apprentices' smoking behavior.

Results: It is estimated that the Italian smoking ban generally had no effect on smoking prevalence, quitting ratio, or cigarette consumption of apprentices. However, when the estimates were applied to subpopulations, significant effects were found: -1% in smoking prevalence, +2% in quitting, and -3% in smoking intensity of apprentices with at least a diploma.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Trends in outcome variables 1996–2007. Smoking prevalence (individuals who currently smoke) and smoking intensity (individuals who smoke more than 10 cigarettes per day) on left axes, quit ratio (ratio between former smokers and ever smokers) on right axes.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555295&req=5

ijerph-12-09523-f001: Trends in outcome variables 1996–2007. Smoking prevalence (individuals who currently smoke) and smoking intensity (individuals who smoke more than 10 cigarettes per day) on left axes, quit ratio (ratio between former smokers and ever smokers) on right axes.

Mentions: Figure 1 shows the trends in the outcomes of interest. The solid, dash and dash-dot lines represent, respectively, smoking prevalence (% of smokers), smoking intensity (% of people smoking more than 10 cigarettes per day) and quit ratio (ratio between quitters and ever-smokers). In addition to the quit ratio that seems to present a slightly increasing trend over time, the other two outcomes do not highlight evident trends over time but instead show variability over time, which supports the use of the segmented regression approach to more flexibly model trends’ variations over time.


Estimating the Smoking Ban Effects on Smoking Prevalence, Quitting and Cigarette Consumption in a Population Study of Apprentices in Italy.

Pieroni L, Muzi G, Quercia A, Lanari D, Rundo C, Minelli L, Salmasi L, dell'Omo M - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Trends in outcome variables 1996–2007. Smoking prevalence (individuals who currently smoke) and smoking intensity (individuals who smoke more than 10 cigarettes per day) on left axes, quit ratio (ratio between former smokers and ever smokers) on right axes.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555295&req=5

ijerph-12-09523-f001: Trends in outcome variables 1996–2007. Smoking prevalence (individuals who currently smoke) and smoking intensity (individuals who smoke more than 10 cigarettes per day) on left axes, quit ratio (ratio between former smokers and ever smokers) on right axes.
Mentions: Figure 1 shows the trends in the outcomes of interest. The solid, dash and dash-dot lines represent, respectively, smoking prevalence (% of smokers), smoking intensity (% of people smoking more than 10 cigarettes per day) and quit ratio (ratio between quitters and ever-smokers). In addition to the quit ratio that seems to present a slightly increasing trend over time, the other two outcomes do not highlight evident trends over time but instead show variability over time, which supports the use of the segmented regression approach to more flexibly model trends’ variations over time.

Bottom Line: We evaluated the effects of the Italian 2005 smoking ban in public places on the prevalence of smoking, quitting and cigarette consumption of young workers.It is estimated that the Italian smoking ban generally had no effect on smoking prevalence, quitting ratio, or cigarette consumption of apprentices.However, when the estimates were applied to subpopulations, significant effects were found: -1% in smoking prevalence, +2% in quitting, and -3% in smoking intensity of apprentices with at least a diploma.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Political Science, University of Perugia, via Pascoli 20, 06123 Perugia, Italy. luca.pieroni@unipg.it.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: We evaluated the effects of the Italian 2005 smoking ban in public places on the prevalence of smoking, quitting and cigarette consumption of young workers.

Data and methods: The dataset was obtained from non-computerized registers of medical examinations for a population of workers with apprenticeship contracts residing in the province of Viterbo, Italy, in the period 1996-2007. To estimate the effects of the ban, a segmented regression approach was used, exploiting the discontinuity introduced by the application of the law on apprentices' smoking behavior.

Results: It is estimated that the Italian smoking ban generally had no effect on smoking prevalence, quitting ratio, or cigarette consumption of apprentices. However, when the estimates were applied to subpopulations, significant effects were found: -1% in smoking prevalence, +2% in quitting, and -3% in smoking intensity of apprentices with at least a diploma.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus