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Wrist Hypothermia Related to Continuous Work with a Computer Mouse: A Digital Infrared Imaging Pilot Study.

Reste J, Zvagule T, Kurjane N, Martinsone Z, Martinsone I, Seile A, Vanadzins I - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: Computer work is characterized by sedentary static workload with low-intensity energy metabolism.Four people participated in the study.The preliminary observational findings indicate the significant effect of the duration and ergonomics of computer mouse work on the development of hand hypothermia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Occupational Safety and Environmental Health, Riga Stradins University, Dzirciema Street 16, Riga LV 1007, Latvia. jelena.reste@rsu.lv.

ABSTRACT
Computer work is characterized by sedentary static workload with low-intensity energy metabolism. The aim of our study was to evaluate the dynamics of skin surface temperature in the hand during prolonged computer mouse work under different ergonomic setups. Digital infrared imaging of the right forearm and wrist was performed during three hours of continuous computer work (measured at the start and every 15 minutes thereafter) in a laboratory with controlled ambient conditions. Four people participated in the study. Three different ergonomic computer mouse setups were tested on three different days (horizontal computer mouse without mouse pad; horizontal computer mouse with mouse pad and padded wrist support; vertical computer mouse without mouse pad). The study revealed a significantly strong negative correlation between the temperature of the dorsal surface of the wrist and time spent working with a computer mouse. Hand skin temperature decreased markedly after one hour of continuous computer mouse work. Vertical computer mouse work preserved more stable and higher temperatures of the wrist (>30 °C), while continuous use of a horizontal mouse for more than two hours caused an extremely low temperature (<28 °C) in distal parts of the hand. The preliminary observational findings indicate the significant effect of the duration and ergonomics of computer mouse work on the development of hand hypothermia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Digital infrared image of the right hand with regions of interest marked (1) proximal half of lateral surface of the right forearm (projection site of wrist extensor muscles); (2) dorsal surface of the right wrist.
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ijerph-12-09265-f001: Digital infrared image of the right hand with regions of interest marked (1) proximal half of lateral surface of the right forearm (projection site of wrist extensor muscles); (2) dorsal surface of the right wrist.

Mentions: Data on skin surface temperature were acquired from digital infrared images processed with specialized imaging analysis software IR Flash Medical Version 2.14.14.4. The dorsal surface of the right wrist at the level of the metacarpals and the proximal half of the lateral surface of the right forearm (projection site of wrist extensor muscle group) were set as the main regions of interest where the calculations of the skin surface’s mean temperature were made (see Figure 1). Additionally, the point of minimal temperature in the distal parts of the fingers was fixed for more precise evaluation of skin temperature drop in the right wrist; some extra measurements of the mean temperature at the same regions of interest in the left forearm and wrist were also performed. Additional measurements were done at the beginning and end of each trial. Afterwards the data were transposed to Microsoft Excel and the statistical program IBM SPSS Statistics Version 17.0. The significance level was set at 0.05. A mixed multiple-way repeated analysis of variance was performed. Skin surface temperature was evaluated in connection with the time elapsed by correlation analysis. Differences in dynamics of skin surface temperature changes under different ergonomic scenarios were explored by comparative analysis in each person individually, as well as the similarities between persons in each ergonomic scenario being investigated.


Wrist Hypothermia Related to Continuous Work with a Computer Mouse: A Digital Infrared Imaging Pilot Study.

Reste J, Zvagule T, Kurjane N, Martinsone Z, Martinsone I, Seile A, Vanadzins I - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Digital infrared image of the right hand with regions of interest marked (1) proximal half of lateral surface of the right forearm (projection site of wrist extensor muscles); (2) dorsal surface of the right wrist.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555279&req=5

ijerph-12-09265-f001: Digital infrared image of the right hand with regions of interest marked (1) proximal half of lateral surface of the right forearm (projection site of wrist extensor muscles); (2) dorsal surface of the right wrist.
Mentions: Data on skin surface temperature were acquired from digital infrared images processed with specialized imaging analysis software IR Flash Medical Version 2.14.14.4. The dorsal surface of the right wrist at the level of the metacarpals and the proximal half of the lateral surface of the right forearm (projection site of wrist extensor muscle group) were set as the main regions of interest where the calculations of the skin surface’s mean temperature were made (see Figure 1). Additionally, the point of minimal temperature in the distal parts of the fingers was fixed for more precise evaluation of skin temperature drop in the right wrist; some extra measurements of the mean temperature at the same regions of interest in the left forearm and wrist were also performed. Additional measurements were done at the beginning and end of each trial. Afterwards the data were transposed to Microsoft Excel and the statistical program IBM SPSS Statistics Version 17.0. The significance level was set at 0.05. A mixed multiple-way repeated analysis of variance was performed. Skin surface temperature was evaluated in connection with the time elapsed by correlation analysis. Differences in dynamics of skin surface temperature changes under different ergonomic scenarios were explored by comparative analysis in each person individually, as well as the similarities between persons in each ergonomic scenario being investigated.

Bottom Line: Computer work is characterized by sedentary static workload with low-intensity energy metabolism.Four people participated in the study.The preliminary observational findings indicate the significant effect of the duration and ergonomics of computer mouse work on the development of hand hypothermia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Occupational Safety and Environmental Health, Riga Stradins University, Dzirciema Street 16, Riga LV 1007, Latvia. jelena.reste@rsu.lv.

ABSTRACT
Computer work is characterized by sedentary static workload with low-intensity energy metabolism. The aim of our study was to evaluate the dynamics of skin surface temperature in the hand during prolonged computer mouse work under different ergonomic setups. Digital infrared imaging of the right forearm and wrist was performed during three hours of continuous computer work (measured at the start and every 15 minutes thereafter) in a laboratory with controlled ambient conditions. Four people participated in the study. Three different ergonomic computer mouse setups were tested on three different days (horizontal computer mouse without mouse pad; horizontal computer mouse with mouse pad and padded wrist support; vertical computer mouse without mouse pad). The study revealed a significantly strong negative correlation between the temperature of the dorsal surface of the wrist and time spent working with a computer mouse. Hand skin temperature decreased markedly after one hour of continuous computer mouse work. Vertical computer mouse work preserved more stable and higher temperatures of the wrist (>30 °C), while continuous use of a horizontal mouse for more than two hours caused an extremely low temperature (<28 °C) in distal parts of the hand. The preliminary observational findings indicate the significant effect of the duration and ergonomics of computer mouse work on the development of hand hypothermia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus