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Short-Term Effect of Ambient Temperature and the Risk of Stroke: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Lian H, Ruan Y, Liang R, Liu X, Fan Z - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: We converted all estimates effects into relative risk (RR) per 1 °C increase/decrease in temperature from 75th to 99th or 25th to 1st percentiles, then conducted meta-analyses to combine the ultimate RRs, and assessed health impact among the population. 20 articles were included in the final analysis.The same trends can be found in both effects of mortality and the cold effect for morbidity.Short-term changes of both low and high temperature had statistically significant impacts on MACBE.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cardiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing 100730, China. lianhui1988@163.com.

ABSTRACT

Background and purpose: The relationship between stroke and short-term temperature changes remains controversial. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate the association between stroke and both high and low temperatures, and health assessment.

Methods: We searched PubMed, Embase, Cochrane, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) and Wanfang Data up to 14 September 2014. Study selection, quality assessment, and author-contractions were steps before data extraction. We converted all estimates effects into relative risk (RR) per 1 °C increase/decrease in temperature from 75th to 99th or 25th to 1st percentiles, then conducted meta-analyses to combine the ultimate RRs, and assessed health impact among the population.

Results: 20 articles were included in the final analysis. The overall analysis showed a positive relationship between 1 °C change and the occurrence of major adverse cerebrovascular events (MACBE), 1.1% (95% confidence intervals (CI), 0.6 to 1.7) and 1.2% (95% CI, 0.8 to 1.6) increase for hot and cold effects separately. The same trends can be found in both effects of mortality and the cold effect for morbidity. Hot temperature acted as a protective factor of hemorrhage stroke (HS), -1.9% (95% CI, -2.8 to -0.9), however, it acted as a risk factor for ischemic stroke (IS), 1.2% (95% CI, 0.7 to 1.8).

Conclusion: Short-term changes of both low and high temperature had statistically significant impacts on MACBE.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Forrest plots for relationship between the temperature change and IS. A and B stand for hot and cold effect, respectively.
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ijerph-12-09068-f006: Forrest plots for relationship between the temperature change and IS. A and B stand for hot and cold effect, respectively.

Mentions: Among the studies that took morbidity as the outcome (Figure 3), we did not find positive relationship between temperature change and stroke (0.0, (−0.7 to 0.7)) in the hot effect, while in the cold one, a 0.9% (0.3 to 1.6) increase had been seen. For those who suffered from stroke and died (Figure 4), a stronger association had been found. In the hot effect, 1 °C increase in temperature related to 1.5% (0.9 to 2.2) increase in death, while in the cold, the percent change appeared to be 1.2% (0.9 to 1.5). As several of the included studies took only IS or HS as the outcome variables, we also analyzed each of them. In the studies observing HS (Figure 5), the hot temperature appeared as a protective factor, a 1 °C increase in temperature related to −1.9% (−2.8 to −0.9), by contrast, the cold temperature acted as a risk factor. Temperature changes acted as risk factors in both hot and cold effects for IS (Figure 6). p values for Egger’s test for overall analysis can be found in Table 2.


Short-Term Effect of Ambient Temperature and the Risk of Stroke: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Lian H, Ruan Y, Liang R, Liu X, Fan Z - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Forrest plots for relationship between the temperature change and IS. A and B stand for hot and cold effect, respectively.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555265&req=5

ijerph-12-09068-f006: Forrest plots for relationship between the temperature change and IS. A and B stand for hot and cold effect, respectively.
Mentions: Among the studies that took morbidity as the outcome (Figure 3), we did not find positive relationship between temperature change and stroke (0.0, (−0.7 to 0.7)) in the hot effect, while in the cold one, a 0.9% (0.3 to 1.6) increase had been seen. For those who suffered from stroke and died (Figure 4), a stronger association had been found. In the hot effect, 1 °C increase in temperature related to 1.5% (0.9 to 2.2) increase in death, while in the cold, the percent change appeared to be 1.2% (0.9 to 1.5). As several of the included studies took only IS or HS as the outcome variables, we also analyzed each of them. In the studies observing HS (Figure 5), the hot temperature appeared as a protective factor, a 1 °C increase in temperature related to −1.9% (−2.8 to −0.9), by contrast, the cold temperature acted as a risk factor. Temperature changes acted as risk factors in both hot and cold effects for IS (Figure 6). p values for Egger’s test for overall analysis can be found in Table 2.

Bottom Line: We converted all estimates effects into relative risk (RR) per 1 °C increase/decrease in temperature from 75th to 99th or 25th to 1st percentiles, then conducted meta-analyses to combine the ultimate RRs, and assessed health impact among the population. 20 articles were included in the final analysis.The same trends can be found in both effects of mortality and the cold effect for morbidity.Short-term changes of both low and high temperature had statistically significant impacts on MACBE.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cardiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing 100730, China. lianhui1988@163.com.

ABSTRACT

Background and purpose: The relationship between stroke and short-term temperature changes remains controversial. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate the association between stroke and both high and low temperatures, and health assessment.

Methods: We searched PubMed, Embase, Cochrane, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) and Wanfang Data up to 14 September 2014. Study selection, quality assessment, and author-contractions were steps before data extraction. We converted all estimates effects into relative risk (RR) per 1 °C increase/decrease in temperature from 75th to 99th or 25th to 1st percentiles, then conducted meta-analyses to combine the ultimate RRs, and assessed health impact among the population.

Results: 20 articles were included in the final analysis. The overall analysis showed a positive relationship between 1 °C change and the occurrence of major adverse cerebrovascular events (MACBE), 1.1% (95% confidence intervals (CI), 0.6 to 1.7) and 1.2% (95% CI, 0.8 to 1.6) increase for hot and cold effects separately. The same trends can be found in both effects of mortality and the cold effect for morbidity. Hot temperature acted as a protective factor of hemorrhage stroke (HS), -1.9% (95% CI, -2.8 to -0.9), however, it acted as a risk factor for ischemic stroke (IS), 1.2% (95% CI, 0.7 to 1.8).

Conclusion: Short-term changes of both low and high temperature had statistically significant impacts on MACBE.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus