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Urbanization and Mental Health in China: Linking the 2010 Population Census with a Cross-Sectional Survey.

Chen J, Chen S, Landry PF - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: Along with the rapid urbanization in China, the state of mental health also receives growing attention.Empirical measures, however, have not been developed to assess the impact of urbanization on mental health and the dramatic spatial variations.We use this county-specific CES-D score to compute the CES-D score for the urban population at the prefectural level, and to demonstrate the dramatic spatial variations in urbanization and mental health across China: highly populated cities along the eastern coast such as Shenyang and Shanghai show high CES-D scores, as do cities in western China with high population density and a high proportion of educated ethnic minorities.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Applied Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Hum, Kowloon, Hong Kong. ssjuanc@polyu.edu.hk.

ABSTRACT
Along with the rapid urbanization in China, the state of mental health also receives growing attention. Empirical measures, however, have not been developed to assess the impact of urbanization on mental health and the dramatic spatial variations. Innovatively linking the 2010 Chinese Population Census with a 2011 national survey of urban residents, we first assess the impact of urbanization on depressive symptoms measured by the Center of Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) of 1288 survey respondents. We then retrieve county-level characteristics from the 2010 Chinese Population Census that match the individual characteristics in the survey, so as to create a profile of the "average person" for each of the 2869 counties or city districts, and predict a county-specific CES-D score. We use this county-specific CES-D score to compute the CES-D score for the urban population at the prefectural level, and to demonstrate the dramatic spatial variations in urbanization and mental health across China: highly populated cities along the eastern coast such as Shenyang and Shanghai show high CES-D scores, as do cities in western China with high population density and a high proportion of educated ethnic minorities.

No MeSH data available.


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Estimated effects of county population density and individual education and occupation on CES-D scores.
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ijerph-12-09012-f001: Estimated effects of county population density and individual education and occupation on CES-D scores.

Mentions: In Table 2, we display results from the two OLS regressions on the CES-D scores with the individual socio-demographic characteristics from the survey and the county-level population density from the 2010 Census as independent variables. The natural logarithm of county-level population density is a consistent, strong, and significant predictor of individual CES-D scores, with coefficient = 1.38 and p < 0.001 in both models, which indicates that a one percent increase in county-level population density would lead to 1.38 increase in the mean CES-D score. Figure 1a further demonstrates that as the population density changes from 60.74 to 4168.95 people per square kilometer across the 31 counties or city districts, the average predicted individual CES-D score increases from 2.61 to 8.44, an almost 6-point difference on the CES-D scale of 0–24.


Urbanization and Mental Health in China: Linking the 2010 Population Census with a Cross-Sectional Survey.

Chen J, Chen S, Landry PF - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Estimated effects of county population density and individual education and occupation on CES-D scores.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555260&req=5

ijerph-12-09012-f001: Estimated effects of county population density and individual education and occupation on CES-D scores.
Mentions: In Table 2, we display results from the two OLS regressions on the CES-D scores with the individual socio-demographic characteristics from the survey and the county-level population density from the 2010 Census as independent variables. The natural logarithm of county-level population density is a consistent, strong, and significant predictor of individual CES-D scores, with coefficient = 1.38 and p < 0.001 in both models, which indicates that a one percent increase in county-level population density would lead to 1.38 increase in the mean CES-D score. Figure 1a further demonstrates that as the population density changes from 60.74 to 4168.95 people per square kilometer across the 31 counties or city districts, the average predicted individual CES-D score increases from 2.61 to 8.44, an almost 6-point difference on the CES-D scale of 0–24.

Bottom Line: Along with the rapid urbanization in China, the state of mental health also receives growing attention.Empirical measures, however, have not been developed to assess the impact of urbanization on mental health and the dramatic spatial variations.We use this county-specific CES-D score to compute the CES-D score for the urban population at the prefectural level, and to demonstrate the dramatic spatial variations in urbanization and mental health across China: highly populated cities along the eastern coast such as Shenyang and Shanghai show high CES-D scores, as do cities in western China with high population density and a high proportion of educated ethnic minorities.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Applied Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Hum, Kowloon, Hong Kong. ssjuanc@polyu.edu.hk.

ABSTRACT
Along with the rapid urbanization in China, the state of mental health also receives growing attention. Empirical measures, however, have not been developed to assess the impact of urbanization on mental health and the dramatic spatial variations. Innovatively linking the 2010 Chinese Population Census with a 2011 national survey of urban residents, we first assess the impact of urbanization on depressive symptoms measured by the Center of Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) of 1288 survey respondents. We then retrieve county-level characteristics from the 2010 Chinese Population Census that match the individual characteristics in the survey, so as to create a profile of the "average person" for each of the 2869 counties or city districts, and predict a county-specific CES-D score. We use this county-specific CES-D score to compute the CES-D score for the urban population at the prefectural level, and to demonstrate the dramatic spatial variations in urbanization and mental health across China: highly populated cities along the eastern coast such as Shenyang and Shanghai show high CES-D scores, as do cities in western China with high population density and a high proportion of educated ethnic minorities.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus