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Cr(VI) Sorption/Desorption on Pine Sawdust and Oak Wood Ash.

Núñez-Delgado A, Fernández-Sanjurjo MJ, Álvarez-Rodríguez E, Cutillas-Barreiro L, Nóvoa-Muñoz J, Arias-Estévez M - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: The objective of this work was to study Cr(VI) sorption/desorption on two by-products from the wood industry: pine sawdust and oak wood ash.Sorption curves were well fitted to the Freundlich and Lineal models.In view of the results, both materials can be considered of very limited value to remove Cr from polluted soil and water, which can be of relevance regarding its appropriate use as biosorbents and recycled by-products.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry, Engineering Polytechnic School, University of Santiago de Compostela, Lugo 27002, Spain. avelino.nunez@usc.es.

ABSTRACT
The objective of this work was to study Cr(VI) sorption/desorption on two by-products from the wood industry: pine sawdust and oak wood ash. The retention/release experiments were carried out using standard batch-type trials. In the sorption-phase experiments, pine sawdust showed 23% sorption when a concentration of 100 mg Cr(VI)ŸL-1 was added, whereas sorption on oak wood ash was 17%. In the desorption-phase, chromium release was clearly higher from pine sawdust than from oak wood ash (98% and 66%, respectively). Sorption curves were well fitted to the Freundlich and Lineal models. In view of the results, both materials can be considered of very limited value to remove Cr from polluted soil and water, which can be of relevance regarding its appropriate use as biosorbents and recycled by-products.

No MeSH data available.


Sorption curves for oak wood ash and pine sawdust.
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ijerph-12-08849-f001: Sorption curves for oak wood ash and pine sawdust.

Mentions: Figure 1 shows increased Cr sorption as a function of Cr concentration in the equilibrium, with more pronounced slope for pine sawdust, as previously detected for other biosorbents [25,26].


Cr(VI) Sorption/Desorption on Pine Sawdust and Oak Wood Ash.

Núñez-Delgado A, Fernández-Sanjurjo MJ, Álvarez-Rodríguez E, Cutillas-Barreiro L, Nóvoa-Muñoz J, Arias-Estévez M - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Sorption curves for oak wood ash and pine sawdust.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555251&req=5

ijerph-12-08849-f001: Sorption curves for oak wood ash and pine sawdust.
Mentions: Figure 1 shows increased Cr sorption as a function of Cr concentration in the equilibrium, with more pronounced slope for pine sawdust, as previously detected for other biosorbents [25,26].

Bottom Line: The objective of this work was to study Cr(VI) sorption/desorption on two by-products from the wood industry: pine sawdust and oak wood ash.Sorption curves were well fitted to the Freundlich and Lineal models.In view of the results, both materials can be considered of very limited value to remove Cr from polluted soil and water, which can be of relevance regarding its appropriate use as biosorbents and recycled by-products.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry, Engineering Polytechnic School, University of Santiago de Compostela, Lugo 27002, Spain. avelino.nunez@usc.es.

ABSTRACT
The objective of this work was to study Cr(VI) sorption/desorption on two by-products from the wood industry: pine sawdust and oak wood ash. The retention/release experiments were carried out using standard batch-type trials. In the sorption-phase experiments, pine sawdust showed 23% sorption when a concentration of 100 mg Cr(VI)ŸL-1 was added, whereas sorption on oak wood ash was 17%. In the desorption-phase, chromium release was clearly higher from pine sawdust than from oak wood ash (98% and 66%, respectively). Sorption curves were well fitted to the Freundlich and Lineal models. In view of the results, both materials can be considered of very limited value to remove Cr from polluted soil and water, which can be of relevance regarding its appropriate use as biosorbents and recycled by-products.

No MeSH data available.