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Impact of National Smoke-Free Legislation on Educational Disparities in Smoke-Free Homes: Findings from the SIDRIAT Longitudinal Study.

Gorini G, Carreras G, Cortini B, Verdi S, Petronio MG, Sestini P, Chellini E - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: The adoption of HSBs significantly increased from 60% in 2002 to 75% in 2012-2014, with the increase recorded in youths with ≥1 smoking parent only (from 22% at baseline to 46% at follow-up).The presence of HSBs at baseline was more likely in families with ≥1 graduate parent compared to those with no graduate parents (prevalence ratio (PR) = 1.34, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.15-1.57), either in families with ≥1 smoking parent (PR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.17-1.58) or in families with non-smoking parents (PR = 1.61, 95% CI = 1.01-2.56).The Italian ban on smoking in public places may have increased the adoption of smoke-free homes in families with smoking and non-graduate parents, causing the drop of the socioeconomic gap in smoke-free homes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Occupational & Environmental Epidemiology Unit-Cancer Research & Prevention Institute (ISPO), Florence 50141, Italy. g.gorini@ispo.toscana.it.

ABSTRACT
Families with lower socioeconomic status are less likely to adopt household smoking bans (HSB). The aim of this study was to determine whether socioeconomic disparities in HSB prevalence in Italy decreased 7-9 years after the introduction of the Italian ban on smoking in public places. A longitudinal, 12-year, two-wave study was conducted on a sample of 3091 youths aged 6-14 years in 2002; 1763 (57%) were re-interviewed in 2012-2014. A Poisson regression with a robust error variance was used to assess the association between socioeconomic disparities and HSB prevalence. The adoption of HSBs significantly increased from 60% in 2002 to 75% in 2012-2014, with the increase recorded in youths with ≥1 smoking parent only (from 22% at baseline to 46% at follow-up). The presence of HSBs at baseline was more likely in families with ≥1 graduate parent compared to those with no graduate parents (prevalence ratio (PR) = 1.34, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.15-1.57), either in families with ≥1 smoking parent (PR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.17-1.58) or in families with non-smoking parents (PR = 1.61, 95% CI = 1.01-2.56). Conversely, at follow-up socioeconomic disparities dropped since families with no graduate parents were 1.5-fold more likely to introduce a HSB between the two waves. The Italian ban on smoking in public places may have increased the adoption of smoke-free homes in families with smoking and non-graduate parents, causing the drop of the socioeconomic gap in smoke-free homes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flow chart of the SIDRIA-Italian Studies on Respiratory Disturbances in Childhood and the Environment-in Tuscany (SIDRIAT) study.
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ijerph-12-08705-f001: Flow chart of the SIDRIA-Italian Studies on Respiratory Disturbances in Childhood and the Environment-in Tuscany (SIDRIAT) study.

Mentions: The present SIDRIAT study was conducted in the three SIDRIA-2 study areas located in Tuscany (Florence, Empoli, Siena; 1.25 millions of total inhabitants in 2002). Information regarding youths’ and parents’ smoking status, parents’ educational level, and household smoking ban prevalence was collected for 3,169 children aged 6–7 years and 3767 adolescents aged 13–14 in 2002 (6936 youths, in total) (Figure 1). For the cohort of children, variables used in the SIDRIAT study (parental smoking status and educational level, presence of the HSB) were taken from the questionnaires completed by their parents. For the cohort of adolescents information regarding youths’ and parents’ smoking status, and presence of HSBs was taken from the questionnaires completed by adolescents themselves, whereas parental educational level was taken from the questionnaires completed by their parents. In 2010, due to temporal and funding constraints we decided to trace about a half of the baseline cohort, so we traced landline phone numbers of 3091 youths who were equally distributed in the three areas (44.6% of the initial SIDRIA-2 youths): 1397 and 1694 from the younger and older cohorts, respectively, and these became the first-wave baseline cohort (Figure 1). Considering gender and age, the two variables used for estimating SIDRIA-2 representative sample, there were no differences between SIDRIAT participants (N = 3091) and those with no traced phone numbers (N = 3845).


Impact of National Smoke-Free Legislation on Educational Disparities in Smoke-Free Homes: Findings from the SIDRIAT Longitudinal Study.

Gorini G, Carreras G, Cortini B, Verdi S, Petronio MG, Sestini P, Chellini E - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Flow chart of the SIDRIA-Italian Studies on Respiratory Disturbances in Childhood and the Environment-in Tuscany (SIDRIAT) study.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555243&req=5

ijerph-12-08705-f001: Flow chart of the SIDRIA-Italian Studies on Respiratory Disturbances in Childhood and the Environment-in Tuscany (SIDRIAT) study.
Mentions: The present SIDRIAT study was conducted in the three SIDRIA-2 study areas located in Tuscany (Florence, Empoli, Siena; 1.25 millions of total inhabitants in 2002). Information regarding youths’ and parents’ smoking status, parents’ educational level, and household smoking ban prevalence was collected for 3,169 children aged 6–7 years and 3767 adolescents aged 13–14 in 2002 (6936 youths, in total) (Figure 1). For the cohort of children, variables used in the SIDRIAT study (parental smoking status and educational level, presence of the HSB) were taken from the questionnaires completed by their parents. For the cohort of adolescents information regarding youths’ and parents’ smoking status, and presence of HSBs was taken from the questionnaires completed by adolescents themselves, whereas parental educational level was taken from the questionnaires completed by their parents. In 2010, due to temporal and funding constraints we decided to trace about a half of the baseline cohort, so we traced landline phone numbers of 3091 youths who were equally distributed in the three areas (44.6% of the initial SIDRIA-2 youths): 1397 and 1694 from the younger and older cohorts, respectively, and these became the first-wave baseline cohort (Figure 1). Considering gender and age, the two variables used for estimating SIDRIA-2 representative sample, there were no differences between SIDRIAT participants (N = 3091) and those with no traced phone numbers (N = 3845).

Bottom Line: The adoption of HSBs significantly increased from 60% in 2002 to 75% in 2012-2014, with the increase recorded in youths with ≥1 smoking parent only (from 22% at baseline to 46% at follow-up).The presence of HSBs at baseline was more likely in families with ≥1 graduate parent compared to those with no graduate parents (prevalence ratio (PR) = 1.34, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.15-1.57), either in families with ≥1 smoking parent (PR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.17-1.58) or in families with non-smoking parents (PR = 1.61, 95% CI = 1.01-2.56).The Italian ban on smoking in public places may have increased the adoption of smoke-free homes in families with smoking and non-graduate parents, causing the drop of the socioeconomic gap in smoke-free homes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Occupational & Environmental Epidemiology Unit-Cancer Research & Prevention Institute (ISPO), Florence 50141, Italy. g.gorini@ispo.toscana.it.

ABSTRACT
Families with lower socioeconomic status are less likely to adopt household smoking bans (HSB). The aim of this study was to determine whether socioeconomic disparities in HSB prevalence in Italy decreased 7-9 years after the introduction of the Italian ban on smoking in public places. A longitudinal, 12-year, two-wave study was conducted on a sample of 3091 youths aged 6-14 years in 2002; 1763 (57%) were re-interviewed in 2012-2014. A Poisson regression with a robust error variance was used to assess the association between socioeconomic disparities and HSB prevalence. The adoption of HSBs significantly increased from 60% in 2002 to 75% in 2012-2014, with the increase recorded in youths with ≥1 smoking parent only (from 22% at baseline to 46% at follow-up). The presence of HSBs at baseline was more likely in families with ≥1 graduate parent compared to those with no graduate parents (prevalence ratio (PR) = 1.34, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.15-1.57), either in families with ≥1 smoking parent (PR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.17-1.58) or in families with non-smoking parents (PR = 1.61, 95% CI = 1.01-2.56). Conversely, at follow-up socioeconomic disparities dropped since families with no graduate parents were 1.5-fold more likely to introduce a HSB between the two waves. The Italian ban on smoking in public places may have increased the adoption of smoke-free homes in families with smoking and non-graduate parents, causing the drop of the socioeconomic gap in smoke-free homes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus