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A Comparison of the Sodium Content of Supermarket Private-Label and Branded Foods in Australia.

Trevena H, Neal B, Dunford E, Haskelberg H, Wu JH - Nutrients (2015)

Bottom Line: Mean sodium values were compared for: (1) all products in 2013; (2) products in both 2011 and 2013; and (3) products only in 2013.For products available in both 2011 and 2013 there was a ≤2% (1%-3%) mean sodium reduction overall with no difference in reformulation between supermarket private-label and branded products (p = 0.73).Supermarket private-label products performed generally better than branded in terms of their sodium content.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The George Institute for Global Health, The School of Public Health, University of Sydney, P.O. Box M201 Missenden Road, Camperdown, Sydney, NSW 2050, Australia. htrevena@georgeinstitute.org.au.

ABSTRACT
Supermarket private-label products are perceived to be lower quality than their branded counterparts. Excess dietary sodium in foods contributes to high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease. Sodium concentrations in products are an important indicator of quality. We compared the sodium content of 15,680 supermarket private-label and branded products, available in four Australian supermarkets between 2011-2013, overall and for 15 food categories. Mean sodium values were compared for: (1) all products in 2013; (2) products in both 2011 and 2013; and (3) products only in 2013. Comparisons were made using paired and unpaired t tests. In each year the proportion of supermarket private-label products was 31%-32%, with overall mean sodium content 17% (12%-23%) lower than branded products in 2013 (p ≤ 0.001). For products available in both 2011 and 2013 there was a ≤2% (1%-3%) mean sodium reduction overall with no difference in reformulation between supermarket private-label and branded products (p = 0.73). New supermarket private-label products in 2013 were 11% lower in sodium than their branded counterparts (p = 0.02). Supermarket private-label products performed generally better than branded in terms of their sodium content. Lower sodium intake translates into lower blood pressure; some supermarket private-label products may be a good option for Australians needing to limit their sodium intake.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean sodium content (mg/100 g) and SE of supermarket private label products for supermarket retailers versus total branded (2011–2013).
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nutrients-07-05321-f002: Mean sodium content (mg/100 g) and SE of supermarket private label products for supermarket retailers versus total branded (2011–2013).

Mentions: Mean sodium content for Coles and for Woolworths products were lower than branded products in all years by between 17% and 27% (all p ≤ 0.002, Figure 2). Mean sodium content fell by 14% for ALDI private-label products between 2011 and 2013 (−77, −136 to −18 mg/100 g; p = 0.01) and in 2013 were 14% lower than branded products (p = 0.01) and not different from the 2013 mean content for Woolworths but still higher than Coles (+47, +1 to +95 mg/100 g; p = 0.04). The sodium content of products at IGA/Metcash were numerically higher than all others in all years with no evidence of improvement between 2011 and 2013 (p = 0.98).


A Comparison of the Sodium Content of Supermarket Private-Label and Branded Foods in Australia.

Trevena H, Neal B, Dunford E, Haskelberg H, Wu JH - Nutrients (2015)

Mean sodium content (mg/100 g) and SE of supermarket private label products for supermarket retailers versus total branded (2011–2013).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555160&req=5

nutrients-07-05321-f002: Mean sodium content (mg/100 g) and SE of supermarket private label products for supermarket retailers versus total branded (2011–2013).
Mentions: Mean sodium content for Coles and for Woolworths products were lower than branded products in all years by between 17% and 27% (all p ≤ 0.002, Figure 2). Mean sodium content fell by 14% for ALDI private-label products between 2011 and 2013 (−77, −136 to −18 mg/100 g; p = 0.01) and in 2013 were 14% lower than branded products (p = 0.01) and not different from the 2013 mean content for Woolworths but still higher than Coles (+47, +1 to +95 mg/100 g; p = 0.04). The sodium content of products at IGA/Metcash were numerically higher than all others in all years with no evidence of improvement between 2011 and 2013 (p = 0.98).

Bottom Line: Mean sodium values were compared for: (1) all products in 2013; (2) products in both 2011 and 2013; and (3) products only in 2013.For products available in both 2011 and 2013 there was a ≤2% (1%-3%) mean sodium reduction overall with no difference in reformulation between supermarket private-label and branded products (p = 0.73).Supermarket private-label products performed generally better than branded in terms of their sodium content.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The George Institute for Global Health, The School of Public Health, University of Sydney, P.O. Box M201 Missenden Road, Camperdown, Sydney, NSW 2050, Australia. htrevena@georgeinstitute.org.au.

ABSTRACT
Supermarket private-label products are perceived to be lower quality than their branded counterparts. Excess dietary sodium in foods contributes to high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease. Sodium concentrations in products are an important indicator of quality. We compared the sodium content of 15,680 supermarket private-label and branded products, available in four Australian supermarkets between 2011-2013, overall and for 15 food categories. Mean sodium values were compared for: (1) all products in 2013; (2) products in both 2011 and 2013; and (3) products only in 2013. Comparisons were made using paired and unpaired t tests. In each year the proportion of supermarket private-label products was 31%-32%, with overall mean sodium content 17% (12%-23%) lower than branded products in 2013 (p ≤ 0.001). For products available in both 2011 and 2013 there was a ≤2% (1%-3%) mean sodium reduction overall with no difference in reformulation between supermarket private-label and branded products (p = 0.73). New supermarket private-label products in 2013 were 11% lower in sodium than their branded counterparts (p = 0.02). Supermarket private-label products performed generally better than branded in terms of their sodium content. Lower sodium intake translates into lower blood pressure; some supermarket private-label products may be a good option for Australians needing to limit their sodium intake.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus