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Aqueous Extract of Nypa fruticans Wurmb. Vinegar Alleviates Postprandial Hyperglycemia in Normoglycemic Rats.

Yusoff NA, Ahmad M, Al-Hindi B, Widyawati T, Yam MF, Mahmud R, Razak KN, Asmawi MZ - Nutrients (2015)

Bottom Line: Early work has shown that aqueous extract (AE) of NPV exerts a potent antihyperglycemic effect.One mg/mL of AE showed a comparable outcome to the use of phloridzin (1 mM) in vitro as it delayed glucose absorption through isolated rat jejunum more effectively than acarbose (1 mg/mL).Conversely, in spectrophotometric enzymatic assays, AE showed rather a weak inhibitory activity against both α-glucosidase and α-amylase when compared with acarbose.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang 11800, Malaysia. namy11_pha015@student.usm.my.

ABSTRACT
Nypa fruticans Wurmb. vinegar, commonly known as nipa palm vinegar (NPV) has been used as a folklore medicine among the Malay community to treat diabetes. Early work has shown that aqueous extract (AE) of NPV exerts a potent antihyperglycemic effect. Thus, this study is conducted to evaluate the effect of AE on postprandial hyperglycemia in an attempt to understand its mechanism of antidiabetic action. AE were tested via in vitro intestinal glucose absorption, in vivo carbohydrate tolerance tests and spectrophotometric enzyme inhibition assays. One mg/mL of AE showed a comparable outcome to the use of phloridzin (1 mM) in vitro as it delayed glucose absorption through isolated rat jejunum more effectively than acarbose (1 mg/mL). Further in vivo confirmatory tests showed AE (500 mg/kg) to cause a significant suppression in postprandial hyperglycemia 30 min following respective glucose (2 g/kg), sucrose (4 g/kg) and starch (3 g/kg) loadings in normal rats, compared to the control group. Conversely, in spectrophotometric enzymatic assays, AE showed rather a weak inhibitory activity against both α-glucosidase and α-amylase when compared with acarbose. The findings suggested that NPV exerts its anti-diabetic effect by delaying carbohydrate absorption from the small intestine through selective inhibition of intestinal glucose transporters, therefore suppressing postprandial hyperglycemia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effect of control, acarbose, phloridzin and aqueous extract (AE) of NPV on intestinal glucose absorption by everted sac technique. Data is represented as means ± S.E.M. (n = 6). ** p < 0.01 vs. the control group.
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nutrients-07-05320-f001: Effect of control, acarbose, phloridzin and aqueous extract (AE) of NPV on intestinal glucose absorption by everted sac technique. Data is represented as means ± S.E.M. (n = 6). ** p < 0.01 vs. the control group.

Mentions: Figure 1 depicts the in vitro effects of AE, acarbose and phloridzin on intestinal glucose absorption, as investigated using the everted jejunal sac technique. Acarbose, an α-glucosidase inhibitor, and phloridzin, a SGLT inhibitor, were tested for comparison purposes. As shown below, in the absence of test substances, the amount of absorbed glucose was 36.63 mg/g tissue weight. The presence of phloridzin, however, caused a significantly reduced glucose absorption rate (p < 0.01) of 11.23 mg/g tissue weight (an inhibition of 69.34%) in comparison with the control. AE recorded a similar promising outcome as the amount of glucose absorbed significantly decreased to 9.69 mg/g tissue weight (p < 0.01) when compared to the control (a 73.54% reduction in absorption). On the other hand, acarbose caused a 45.67% reduction in glucose absorption, as the absorption rate was 19.9 mg/g tissue weight only. However, although the reduction percentage was quite high, it was not significant compared with the control (p < 0.056).


Aqueous Extract of Nypa fruticans Wurmb. Vinegar Alleviates Postprandial Hyperglycemia in Normoglycemic Rats.

Yusoff NA, Ahmad M, Al-Hindi B, Widyawati T, Yam MF, Mahmud R, Razak KN, Asmawi MZ - Nutrients (2015)

Effect of control, acarbose, phloridzin and aqueous extract (AE) of NPV on intestinal glucose absorption by everted sac technique. Data is represented as means ± S.E.M. (n = 6). ** p < 0.01 vs. the control group.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555159&req=5

nutrients-07-05320-f001: Effect of control, acarbose, phloridzin and aqueous extract (AE) of NPV on intestinal glucose absorption by everted sac technique. Data is represented as means ± S.E.M. (n = 6). ** p < 0.01 vs. the control group.
Mentions: Figure 1 depicts the in vitro effects of AE, acarbose and phloridzin on intestinal glucose absorption, as investigated using the everted jejunal sac technique. Acarbose, an α-glucosidase inhibitor, and phloridzin, a SGLT inhibitor, were tested for comparison purposes. As shown below, in the absence of test substances, the amount of absorbed glucose was 36.63 mg/g tissue weight. The presence of phloridzin, however, caused a significantly reduced glucose absorption rate (p < 0.01) of 11.23 mg/g tissue weight (an inhibition of 69.34%) in comparison with the control. AE recorded a similar promising outcome as the amount of glucose absorbed significantly decreased to 9.69 mg/g tissue weight (p < 0.01) when compared to the control (a 73.54% reduction in absorption). On the other hand, acarbose caused a 45.67% reduction in glucose absorption, as the absorption rate was 19.9 mg/g tissue weight only. However, although the reduction percentage was quite high, it was not significant compared with the control (p < 0.056).

Bottom Line: Early work has shown that aqueous extract (AE) of NPV exerts a potent antihyperglycemic effect.One mg/mL of AE showed a comparable outcome to the use of phloridzin (1 mM) in vitro as it delayed glucose absorption through isolated rat jejunum more effectively than acarbose (1 mg/mL).Conversely, in spectrophotometric enzymatic assays, AE showed rather a weak inhibitory activity against both α-glucosidase and α-amylase when compared with acarbose.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang 11800, Malaysia. namy11_pha015@student.usm.my.

ABSTRACT
Nypa fruticans Wurmb. vinegar, commonly known as nipa palm vinegar (NPV) has been used as a folklore medicine among the Malay community to treat diabetes. Early work has shown that aqueous extract (AE) of NPV exerts a potent antihyperglycemic effect. Thus, this study is conducted to evaluate the effect of AE on postprandial hyperglycemia in an attempt to understand its mechanism of antidiabetic action. AE were tested via in vitro intestinal glucose absorption, in vivo carbohydrate tolerance tests and spectrophotometric enzyme inhibition assays. One mg/mL of AE showed a comparable outcome to the use of phloridzin (1 mM) in vitro as it delayed glucose absorption through isolated rat jejunum more effectively than acarbose (1 mg/mL). Further in vivo confirmatory tests showed AE (500 mg/kg) to cause a significant suppression in postprandial hyperglycemia 30 min following respective glucose (2 g/kg), sucrose (4 g/kg) and starch (3 g/kg) loadings in normal rats, compared to the control group. Conversely, in spectrophotometric enzymatic assays, AE showed rather a weak inhibitory activity against both α-glucosidase and α-amylase when compared with acarbose. The findings suggested that NPV exerts its anti-diabetic effect by delaying carbohydrate absorption from the small intestine through selective inhibition of intestinal glucose transporters, therefore suppressing postprandial hyperglycemia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus