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Development of a Food Group-Based Diet Score and Its Association with Bone Mineral Density in the Elderly: The Rotterdam Study.

de Jonge EA, Kiefte-de Jong JC, de Groot LC, Voortman T, Schoufour JD, Zillikens MC, Hofman A, Uitterlinden AG, Franco OH, Rivadeneira F - Nutrients (2015)

Bottom Line: Food groups that were consistently associated with BMD in the literature were included in the BMD-Diet Score.After adjustment, the BMD-Diet Score was positively associated with BMD (β (95% confidence interval) = 0.009 (0.005, 0.012) g/cm(2) per standard deviation).This effect size was approximately three times as large as has been observed for the Healthy Diet Indicator.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus MC, University Medical Centre, P.O. box 2040, 3000 CA, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. e.a.l.dejonge@erasmusmc.nl.

ABSTRACT
No diet score exists that summarizes the features of a diet that is optimal for bone mineral density (BMD) in the elderly. Our aims were (a) to develop a BMD-Diet Score reflecting a diet that may be beneficial for BMD based on the existing literature, and (b) to examine the association of the BMD-Diet Score and the Healthy Diet Indicator, a score based on guidelines of the World Health Organization, with BMD in Dutch elderly participating in a prospective cohort study, the Rotterdam Study (n = 5144). Baseline dietary intake, assessed using a food frequency questionnaire, was categorized into food groups. Food groups that were consistently associated with BMD in the literature were included in the BMD-Diet Score. BMD was measured repeatedly and was assessed using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. The BMD-Diet Score considered intake of vegetables, fruits, fish, whole grains, legumes/beans and dairy products as "high-BMD" components and meat and confectionary as "low-BMD" components. After adjustment, the BMD-Diet Score was positively associated with BMD (β (95% confidence interval) = 0.009 (0.005, 0.012) g/cm(2) per standard deviation). This effect size was approximately three times as large as has been observed for the Healthy Diet Indicator. The food groups included in our BMD-Diet Score could be considered in the development of future dietary guidelines for healthy ageing.

No MeSH data available.


Results of the narrative review: Food groups that were associated with high or low bone mineral density (BMD) in dietary pattern analyses; The X-axis displays the food groups, derived from dietary patterns that were significantly associated with high or low BMD in the reviewed literature. The Y-axis displays the number of dietary patterns in which corresponding food group occurred (count of dietary patterns). As some studies report more than one dietary pattern to be associated with BMD, the number of patterns that was counted is slightly different from the number of studies that was counted. *1: Although not all studies distinguished between refined and whole grains, those that did found particularly beneficial associations with bone for whole grains only.
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nutrients-07-05317-f001: Results of the narrative review: Food groups that were associated with high or low bone mineral density (BMD) in dietary pattern analyses; The X-axis displays the food groups, derived from dietary patterns that were significantly associated with high or low BMD in the reviewed literature. The Y-axis displays the number of dietary patterns in which corresponding food group occurred (count of dietary patterns). As some studies report more than one dietary pattern to be associated with BMD, the number of patterns that was counted is slightly different from the number of studies that was counted. *1: Although not all studies distinguished between refined and whole grains, those that did found particularly beneficial associations with bone for whole grains only.

Mentions: After careful evaluation of the available evidence, eight food groups were included in the BMD Diet-score: vegetables, fruits, dairy products, whole grain products, fish and legumes & beans as “High-BMD” components and meat (including red, processed and organ meat) and confectionary (including candies, cakes and cookies) as “Low-BMD” components (Figure 1). An overview of food items included in each food group is shown in Table S6.


Development of a Food Group-Based Diet Score and Its Association with Bone Mineral Density in the Elderly: The Rotterdam Study.

de Jonge EA, Kiefte-de Jong JC, de Groot LC, Voortman T, Schoufour JD, Zillikens MC, Hofman A, Uitterlinden AG, Franco OH, Rivadeneira F - Nutrients (2015)

Results of the narrative review: Food groups that were associated with high or low bone mineral density (BMD) in dietary pattern analyses; The X-axis displays the food groups, derived from dietary patterns that were significantly associated with high or low BMD in the reviewed literature. The Y-axis displays the number of dietary patterns in which corresponding food group occurred (count of dietary patterns). As some studies report more than one dietary pattern to be associated with BMD, the number of patterns that was counted is slightly different from the number of studies that was counted. *1: Although not all studies distinguished between refined and whole grains, those that did found particularly beneficial associations with bone for whole grains only.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555156&req=5

nutrients-07-05317-f001: Results of the narrative review: Food groups that were associated with high or low bone mineral density (BMD) in dietary pattern analyses; The X-axis displays the food groups, derived from dietary patterns that were significantly associated with high or low BMD in the reviewed literature. The Y-axis displays the number of dietary patterns in which corresponding food group occurred (count of dietary patterns). As some studies report more than one dietary pattern to be associated with BMD, the number of patterns that was counted is slightly different from the number of studies that was counted. *1: Although not all studies distinguished between refined and whole grains, those that did found particularly beneficial associations with bone for whole grains only.
Mentions: After careful evaluation of the available evidence, eight food groups were included in the BMD Diet-score: vegetables, fruits, dairy products, whole grain products, fish and legumes & beans as “High-BMD” components and meat (including red, processed and organ meat) and confectionary (including candies, cakes and cookies) as “Low-BMD” components (Figure 1). An overview of food items included in each food group is shown in Table S6.

Bottom Line: Food groups that were consistently associated with BMD in the literature were included in the BMD-Diet Score.After adjustment, the BMD-Diet Score was positively associated with BMD (β (95% confidence interval) = 0.009 (0.005, 0.012) g/cm(2) per standard deviation).This effect size was approximately three times as large as has been observed for the Healthy Diet Indicator.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus MC, University Medical Centre, P.O. box 2040, 3000 CA, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. e.a.l.dejonge@erasmusmc.nl.

ABSTRACT
No diet score exists that summarizes the features of a diet that is optimal for bone mineral density (BMD) in the elderly. Our aims were (a) to develop a BMD-Diet Score reflecting a diet that may be beneficial for BMD based on the existing literature, and (b) to examine the association of the BMD-Diet Score and the Healthy Diet Indicator, a score based on guidelines of the World Health Organization, with BMD in Dutch elderly participating in a prospective cohort study, the Rotterdam Study (n = 5144). Baseline dietary intake, assessed using a food frequency questionnaire, was categorized into food groups. Food groups that were consistently associated with BMD in the literature were included in the BMD-Diet Score. BMD was measured repeatedly and was assessed using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. The BMD-Diet Score considered intake of vegetables, fruits, fish, whole grains, legumes/beans and dairy products as "high-BMD" components and meat and confectionary as "low-BMD" components. After adjustment, the BMD-Diet Score was positively associated with BMD (β (95% confidence interval) = 0.009 (0.005, 0.012) g/cm(2) per standard deviation). This effect size was approximately three times as large as has been observed for the Healthy Diet Indicator. The food groups included in our BMD-Diet Score could be considered in the development of future dietary guidelines for healthy ageing.

No MeSH data available.