Limits...
The Placental Microbiome Varies in Association with Low Birth Weight in Full-Term Neonates.

Zheng J, Xiao X, Zhang Q, Mao L, Yu M, Xu J - Nutrients (2015)

Bottom Line: There were significant variations in the composition of placenta microbiota between the LBW and NBW neonates at the phylum and genus level.Furthermore, it indicated that Lactobacillus percentage was positively associated with birth weight (r = 0.541, p = 0.025).In conclusion, our present study for the first time detected the relationship between birth weight and placental microbiome profile in full-term neonates.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Endocrinology, Key Laboratory of Endocrinology, Ministry of Health, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Diabetes Research Center of Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100730, China. zhengjiapumc@163.com.

ABSTRACT
Substantial evidence indicated that low birth weight was an independent risk factor for obesity, impaired glucose regulation, and diabetes later in life. However, investigations into the association between low birth weight and placental microbiome in full-term neonates are limited. Placentas were collected from low birth weight (LBW) and normal birth weight (NBW) full-term neonates (gestational age 37 w0d-41 w6d) consecutively born at Peking Union Medical College Hospital. The anthropometric measurements were measured and 16S ribosomal DNAamplicon high-throughput sequencing were utilized to define bacteria within placenta tissues. It showed that birth weight, ponderal index, head circumference, and placenta weight were significantly lower in LBW than NBW neonates (p < 0.05). The operational taxonomic units (OTUs) (p < 0.05) and the estimators of community richness (Chao) indexes (p < 0.05) showed a significantly lower diversity in LBW than NBW neonates. There were significant variations in the composition of placenta microbiota between the LBW and NBW neonates at the phylum and genus level. Furthermore, it indicated that Lactobacillus percentage was positively associated with birth weight (r = 0.541, p = 0.025). In conclusion, our present study for the first time detected the relationship between birth weight and placental microbiome profile in full-term neonates. It is novel in showing that the placental microbiome varies in association with low birth weight in full-term neonates.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Principal Coordinate Analysis (PCA) plots in LBW and NBW neonates. PCA plots based on unweighted Unifrac metrics. n = 12, in each group. Abbreviations: LBW, Low birth weight; NBW, Normal birth weight.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555154&req=5

nutrients-07-05315-f001: Principal Coordinate Analysis (PCA) plots in LBW and NBW neonates. PCA plots based on unweighted Unifrac metrics. n = 12, in each group. Abbreviations: LBW, Low birth weight; NBW, Normal birth weight.

Mentions: Closer analysis of bacterial differences induced by birth weight were determined by sequencing the 16S rRNA encoding genes present in the placenta. PCA of IlluminaMiSeq amplicon data demonstrated significantly separate clustering of the placenta communities between LBW and NBW groups with principal component (PC1) percent variation explained = 96.89% and PC2 percent variation explained = 0.7%. It indicated that there was a statistically significant clustering by virtue of body weight (Figure 1).


The Placental Microbiome Varies in Association with Low Birth Weight in Full-Term Neonates.

Zheng J, Xiao X, Zhang Q, Mao L, Yu M, Xu J - Nutrients (2015)

Principal Coordinate Analysis (PCA) plots in LBW and NBW neonates. PCA plots based on unweighted Unifrac metrics. n = 12, in each group. Abbreviations: LBW, Low birth weight; NBW, Normal birth weight.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555154&req=5

nutrients-07-05315-f001: Principal Coordinate Analysis (PCA) plots in LBW and NBW neonates. PCA plots based on unweighted Unifrac metrics. n = 12, in each group. Abbreviations: LBW, Low birth weight; NBW, Normal birth weight.
Mentions: Closer analysis of bacterial differences induced by birth weight were determined by sequencing the 16S rRNA encoding genes present in the placenta. PCA of IlluminaMiSeq amplicon data demonstrated significantly separate clustering of the placenta communities between LBW and NBW groups with principal component (PC1) percent variation explained = 96.89% and PC2 percent variation explained = 0.7%. It indicated that there was a statistically significant clustering by virtue of body weight (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: There were significant variations in the composition of placenta microbiota between the LBW and NBW neonates at the phylum and genus level.Furthermore, it indicated that Lactobacillus percentage was positively associated with birth weight (r = 0.541, p = 0.025).In conclusion, our present study for the first time detected the relationship between birth weight and placental microbiome profile in full-term neonates.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Endocrinology, Key Laboratory of Endocrinology, Ministry of Health, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Diabetes Research Center of Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100730, China. zhengjiapumc@163.com.

ABSTRACT
Substantial evidence indicated that low birth weight was an independent risk factor for obesity, impaired glucose regulation, and diabetes later in life. However, investigations into the association between low birth weight and placental microbiome in full-term neonates are limited. Placentas were collected from low birth weight (LBW) and normal birth weight (NBW) full-term neonates (gestational age 37 w0d-41 w6d) consecutively born at Peking Union Medical College Hospital. The anthropometric measurements were measured and 16S ribosomal DNAamplicon high-throughput sequencing were utilized to define bacteria within placenta tissues. It showed that birth weight, ponderal index, head circumference, and placenta weight were significantly lower in LBW than NBW neonates (p < 0.05). The operational taxonomic units (OTUs) (p < 0.05) and the estimators of community richness (Chao) indexes (p < 0.05) showed a significantly lower diversity in LBW than NBW neonates. There were significant variations in the composition of placenta microbiota between the LBW and NBW neonates at the phylum and genus level. Furthermore, it indicated that Lactobacillus percentage was positively associated with birth weight (r = 0.541, p = 0.025). In conclusion, our present study for the first time detected the relationship between birth weight and placental microbiome profile in full-term neonates. It is novel in showing that the placental microbiome varies in association with low birth weight in full-term neonates.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus