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Beverage Consumption: Are Alcoholic and Sugary Drinks Tipping the Balance towards Overweight and Obesity?

Poppitt SD - Nutrients (2015)

Bottom Line: Both of these beverage formats have been increasing as a percentage of the westernized diet over the past 20 years, and both have contributed significantly to an increase in energy consumed in liquid form.Data from epidemiology and intervention studies however have long been contradictory, despite mechanistic evidence pointing towards poor compensation for addition of "liquid" energy from these two sources into the diet providing a strong rational for the balance to be tipped towards weight gain.Regulatory and government intervention has been increasing globally, particularly with respect to intake of SSBs in children.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Human Nutrition Unit, School of Biological Sciences, Department of Medicine, University of Auckland, Auckland 1024, New Zealand. s.poppitt@auckland.ac.nz.

ABSTRACT
The role that energy-containing beverages may play in the development of overweight and obesity remains highly controversial, in particular the alcoholic and sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB). Both of these beverage formats have been increasing as a percentage of the westernized diet over the past 20 years, and both have contributed significantly to an increase in energy consumed in liquid form. Data from epidemiology and intervention studies however have long been contradictory, despite mechanistic evidence pointing towards poor compensation for addition of "liquid" energy from these two sources into the diet providing a strong rational for the balance to be tipped towards weight gain. Regulatory and government intervention has been increasing globally, particularly with respect to intake of SSBs in children. This narrative review presents evidence which both supports and refutes the link between alcohol and carbohydrate-containing liquids and the regulation of body weight, and investigates mechanisms which may underpin any relationship between increased beverage consumption and increased energy intake, body weight and adiposity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean BMI z scores of children aged 2, 4, and 5 years showing daily consumption of sugar sweetened beverages (SSBs), which was significantly different versus nondrinkers of SSBs (from de Boer et al., 2013 [85], with permission).
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nutrients-07-05304-f003: Mean BMI z scores of children aged 2, 4, and 5 years showing daily consumption of sugar sweetened beverages (SSBs), which was significantly different versus nondrinkers of SSBs (from de Boer et al., 2013 [85], with permission).

Mentions: Whilst there is less published data available in younger preschool children, the American Academy of Pediatrics has recommended that young children refrain from intake of SSBs [62]. A recent analysis of the US Early Childhood Longitudinal Survey Birth Cohort conducted in almost 1000 young children showed a significant relationship of SSBs with overweight and obesity. Consumption was associated with both higher BMI-z scores and higher weight status in these young preschool children, aged 2–5 years [85], (see Figure 3).


Beverage Consumption: Are Alcoholic and Sugary Drinks Tipping the Balance towards Overweight and Obesity?

Poppitt SD - Nutrients (2015)

Mean BMI z scores of children aged 2, 4, and 5 years showing daily consumption of sugar sweetened beverages (SSBs), which was significantly different versus nondrinkers of SSBs (from de Boer et al., 2013 [85], with permission).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555143&req=5

nutrients-07-05304-f003: Mean BMI z scores of children aged 2, 4, and 5 years showing daily consumption of sugar sweetened beverages (SSBs), which was significantly different versus nondrinkers of SSBs (from de Boer et al., 2013 [85], with permission).
Mentions: Whilst there is less published data available in younger preschool children, the American Academy of Pediatrics has recommended that young children refrain from intake of SSBs [62]. A recent analysis of the US Early Childhood Longitudinal Survey Birth Cohort conducted in almost 1000 young children showed a significant relationship of SSBs with overweight and obesity. Consumption was associated with both higher BMI-z scores and higher weight status in these young preschool children, aged 2–5 years [85], (see Figure 3).

Bottom Line: Both of these beverage formats have been increasing as a percentage of the westernized diet over the past 20 years, and both have contributed significantly to an increase in energy consumed in liquid form.Data from epidemiology and intervention studies however have long been contradictory, despite mechanistic evidence pointing towards poor compensation for addition of "liquid" energy from these two sources into the diet providing a strong rational for the balance to be tipped towards weight gain.Regulatory and government intervention has been increasing globally, particularly with respect to intake of SSBs in children.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Human Nutrition Unit, School of Biological Sciences, Department of Medicine, University of Auckland, Auckland 1024, New Zealand. s.poppitt@auckland.ac.nz.

ABSTRACT
The role that energy-containing beverages may play in the development of overweight and obesity remains highly controversial, in particular the alcoholic and sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB). Both of these beverage formats have been increasing as a percentage of the westernized diet over the past 20 years, and both have contributed significantly to an increase in energy consumed in liquid form. Data from epidemiology and intervention studies however have long been contradictory, despite mechanistic evidence pointing towards poor compensation for addition of "liquid" energy from these two sources into the diet providing a strong rational for the balance to be tipped towards weight gain. Regulatory and government intervention has been increasing globally, particularly with respect to intake of SSBs in children. This narrative review presents evidence which both supports and refutes the link between alcohol and carbohydrate-containing liquids and the regulation of body weight, and investigates mechanisms which may underpin any relationship between increased beverage consumption and increased energy intake, body weight and adiposity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus