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Dietary Patterns, Alcohol Consumption and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Adults: A Meta-Analysis.

Zhang XY, Shu L, Si CJ, Yu XL, Liao D, Gao W, Zhang L, Zheng PF - Nutrients (2015)

Bottom Line: The decreased risk of CHD was shown for the highest compared with the lowest categories of healthy/prudent dietary patterns (odds ratio (OR) = 0.67; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.60, 0.75; p < 0.00001) and alcohol consumption (OR = 0.68; 95% CI: 0.59, 0.78; p < 0.00001).There was evidence of an increased risk of CHD in the highest compared with the lowest categories of the unhealthy/Western-type dietary patterns (OR = 1.45; 95% CI: 1.05, 2.01; p = 0.02).The results of this meta-analysis indicate that different dietary patterns may be associated with the risk of CHD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nutrition, Zhejiang Hospital, Hangzhou 310013, China. zxy19740804@sina.com.

ABSTRACT
Previous studies reported the potential associations between dietary patterns and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in adulthood, however a consistent perspective has not been established to date. Herein, we carried out this meta-analysis to evaluate the associations between dietary patterns and the risk of CHD. MEDLINE and EBSCO were searched for relevant articles published up to April 2015. A total of 35 articles (reporting 37 original studies) met the inclusion criteria and were included in the present meta-analysis. The decreased risk of CHD was shown for the highest compared with the lowest categories of healthy/prudent dietary patterns (odds ratio (OR) = 0.67; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.60, 0.75; p < 0.00001) and alcohol consumption (OR = 0.68; 95% CI: 0.59, 0.78; p < 0.00001). There was evidence of an increased risk of CHD in the highest compared with the lowest categories of the unhealthy/Western-type dietary patterns (OR = 1.45; 95% CI: 1.05, 2.01; p = 0.02). The results of this meta-analysis indicate that different dietary patterns may be associated with the risk of CHD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Forest plot of the highest compared with the lowest categories of intake of the unhealthy/Western-type dietary patterns and CHD risk.
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nutrients-07-05300-f003: Forest plot of the highest compared with the lowest categories of intake of the unhealthy/Western-type dietary patterns and CHD risk.

Mentions: The unhealthy/Western-type dietary patterns were characterized by high consumption of red and/or processed meat, refined grains, sweets, high-fat dairy products, butter, potatoes and high-fat gravy, and low intakes of fruits and vegetables. The studies under consideration labeled it as “Western” [8,9,13,14,15,23,28], “Animal foods” [17,22,30] and “Dietary pattern 2” [19]. The association between unhealthy/Western-type dietary patterns and the risk of CHD was shown in Figure 3. There was evidence of an increased risk of CHD in the highest compared with the lowest categories of unhealthy/Western-type dietary patterns (OR = 1.45; CI: 1.05, 2.01; p = 0.02) where all studies were combined in the random-effects model. There was significant heterogeneity (I2 = 96%, p < 0.00001).


Dietary Patterns, Alcohol Consumption and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Adults: A Meta-Analysis.

Zhang XY, Shu L, Si CJ, Yu XL, Liao D, Gao W, Zhang L, Zheng PF - Nutrients (2015)

Forest plot of the highest compared with the lowest categories of intake of the unhealthy/Western-type dietary patterns and CHD risk.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555139&req=5

nutrients-07-05300-f003: Forest plot of the highest compared with the lowest categories of intake of the unhealthy/Western-type dietary patterns and CHD risk.
Mentions: The unhealthy/Western-type dietary patterns were characterized by high consumption of red and/or processed meat, refined grains, sweets, high-fat dairy products, butter, potatoes and high-fat gravy, and low intakes of fruits and vegetables. The studies under consideration labeled it as “Western” [8,9,13,14,15,23,28], “Animal foods” [17,22,30] and “Dietary pattern 2” [19]. The association between unhealthy/Western-type dietary patterns and the risk of CHD was shown in Figure 3. There was evidence of an increased risk of CHD in the highest compared with the lowest categories of unhealthy/Western-type dietary patterns (OR = 1.45; CI: 1.05, 2.01; p = 0.02) where all studies were combined in the random-effects model. There was significant heterogeneity (I2 = 96%, p < 0.00001).

Bottom Line: The decreased risk of CHD was shown for the highest compared with the lowest categories of healthy/prudent dietary patterns (odds ratio (OR) = 0.67; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.60, 0.75; p < 0.00001) and alcohol consumption (OR = 0.68; 95% CI: 0.59, 0.78; p < 0.00001).There was evidence of an increased risk of CHD in the highest compared with the lowest categories of the unhealthy/Western-type dietary patterns (OR = 1.45; 95% CI: 1.05, 2.01; p = 0.02).The results of this meta-analysis indicate that different dietary patterns may be associated with the risk of CHD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nutrition, Zhejiang Hospital, Hangzhou 310013, China. zxy19740804@sina.com.

ABSTRACT
Previous studies reported the potential associations between dietary patterns and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in adulthood, however a consistent perspective has not been established to date. Herein, we carried out this meta-analysis to evaluate the associations between dietary patterns and the risk of CHD. MEDLINE and EBSCO were searched for relevant articles published up to April 2015. A total of 35 articles (reporting 37 original studies) met the inclusion criteria and were included in the present meta-analysis. The decreased risk of CHD was shown for the highest compared with the lowest categories of healthy/prudent dietary patterns (odds ratio (OR) = 0.67; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.60, 0.75; p < 0.00001) and alcohol consumption (OR = 0.68; 95% CI: 0.59, 0.78; p < 0.00001). There was evidence of an increased risk of CHD in the highest compared with the lowest categories of the unhealthy/Western-type dietary patterns (OR = 1.45; 95% CI: 1.05, 2.01; p = 0.02). The results of this meta-analysis indicate that different dietary patterns may be associated with the risk of CHD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus