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The Pattern of Fatty Acids Displaced by EPA and DHA Following 12 Months Supplementation Varies between Blood Cell and Plasma Fractions.

Walker CG, West AL, Browning LM, Madden J, Gambell JM, Jebb SA, Calder PC - Nutrients (2015)

Bottom Line: Changes were observed for all FA classes in MNC.Consequently the n-6:n-3 PUFA ratio was reduced in a dose-dependent manner in all pools after 12 months (37%-64% of placebo in the four portions group).We conclude that the profile of the FA decreased in exchange for the increase in EPA + DHA following supplementation differs by FA pool with implications for understanding the impact of n-3 PUFA on blood lipid and blood cell biology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: MRC Human Nutrition Research, Elsie Widdowson Laboratory, Fulbourn Road, Cambridge CB1 9NL, UK. celia.walker@mrc-hnr.cam.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are increased in plasma lipids and blood cell membranes in response to supplementation. Whilst arachidonic acid (AA) is correspondingly decreased, the effect on other fatty acids (FA) is less well described and there may be site-specific differences. In response to 12 months EPA + DHA supplementation in doses equivalent to 0-4 portions of oily fish/week (1 portion: 3.27 g EPA+DHA) multinomial regression analysis was used to identify important FA changes for plasma phosphatidylcholine (PC), cholesteryl ester (CE) and triglyceride (TAG) and for blood mononuclear cells (MNC), red blood cells (RBC) and platelets (PLAT). Dose-dependent increases in EPA + DHA were matched by decreases in several n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in PC, CE, RBC and PLAT, but were predominantly compensated for by oleic acid in TAG. Changes were observed for all FA classes in MNC. Consequently the n-6:n-3 PUFA ratio was reduced in a dose-dependent manner in all pools after 12 months (37%-64% of placebo in the four portions group). We conclude that the profile of the FA decreased in exchange for the increase in EPA + DHA following supplementation differs by FA pool with implications for understanding the impact of n-3 PUFA on blood lipid and blood cell biology.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Patterns of modelled changes in fatty acids which occur with the increase in eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in (a) plasma and (b) blood cell fatty acid pools. Linear combinations of the co-efficients from the multinomial linear regression models were calculated for each fatty acid important for the change in EPA + DHA. As a small regression coefficient for the fatty acid of interest reflected a large change in the outcomes EPA + DHA and vice versa the data are the reciprocal of the co-efficients in order to portray the magnitude of effect, and this is presented in arbitrary units. Fatty acids are grouped according to class to depict the patterns of change in fatty acids for each pool.
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nutrients-07-05285-f001: Patterns of modelled changes in fatty acids which occur with the increase in eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in (a) plasma and (b) blood cell fatty acid pools. Linear combinations of the co-efficients from the multinomial linear regression models were calculated for each fatty acid important for the change in EPA + DHA. As a small regression coefficient for the fatty acid of interest reflected a large change in the outcomes EPA + DHA and vice versa the data are the reciprocal of the co-efficients in order to portray the magnitude of effect, and this is presented in arbitrary units. Fatty acids are grouped according to class to depict the patterns of change in fatty acids for each pool.

Mentions: The FA identified by the multinomial models to be important for change in EPA and DHA are shown for plasma lipid pools in Figure 1a and for blood cells in Figure 1b. The FA displaced in PC were predominantly n-6 PUFA, whereas in TAG they were predominantly MUFA and SFA, and in CE SFA, MUFA and n-6 PUFA were all displaced following EPA and DHA supplementation. In RBC the FA predominantly decreased were n-6 PUFA, in PLAT predominantly SFA and n-6 PUFA, while in MNC there were a range of changes in FA from all classes. Docosapentaenoic acid (DPA; 22:5n-3) increased in most pools (plasma PC and TAG, RBC and MNC) with increased EPA and DHA intake.


The Pattern of Fatty Acids Displaced by EPA and DHA Following 12 Months Supplementation Varies between Blood Cell and Plasma Fractions.

Walker CG, West AL, Browning LM, Madden J, Gambell JM, Jebb SA, Calder PC - Nutrients (2015)

Patterns of modelled changes in fatty acids which occur with the increase in eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in (a) plasma and (b) blood cell fatty acid pools. Linear combinations of the co-efficients from the multinomial linear regression models were calculated for each fatty acid important for the change in EPA + DHA. As a small regression coefficient for the fatty acid of interest reflected a large change in the outcomes EPA + DHA and vice versa the data are the reciprocal of the co-efficients in order to portray the magnitude of effect, and this is presented in arbitrary units. Fatty acids are grouped according to class to depict the patterns of change in fatty acids for each pool.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555124&req=5

nutrients-07-05285-f001: Patterns of modelled changes in fatty acids which occur with the increase in eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in (a) plasma and (b) blood cell fatty acid pools. Linear combinations of the co-efficients from the multinomial linear regression models were calculated for each fatty acid important for the change in EPA + DHA. As a small regression coefficient for the fatty acid of interest reflected a large change in the outcomes EPA + DHA and vice versa the data are the reciprocal of the co-efficients in order to portray the magnitude of effect, and this is presented in arbitrary units. Fatty acids are grouped according to class to depict the patterns of change in fatty acids for each pool.
Mentions: The FA identified by the multinomial models to be important for change in EPA and DHA are shown for plasma lipid pools in Figure 1a and for blood cells in Figure 1b. The FA displaced in PC were predominantly n-6 PUFA, whereas in TAG they were predominantly MUFA and SFA, and in CE SFA, MUFA and n-6 PUFA were all displaced following EPA and DHA supplementation. In RBC the FA predominantly decreased were n-6 PUFA, in PLAT predominantly SFA and n-6 PUFA, while in MNC there were a range of changes in FA from all classes. Docosapentaenoic acid (DPA; 22:5n-3) increased in most pools (plasma PC and TAG, RBC and MNC) with increased EPA and DHA intake.

Bottom Line: Changes were observed for all FA classes in MNC.Consequently the n-6:n-3 PUFA ratio was reduced in a dose-dependent manner in all pools after 12 months (37%-64% of placebo in the four portions group).We conclude that the profile of the FA decreased in exchange for the increase in EPA + DHA following supplementation differs by FA pool with implications for understanding the impact of n-3 PUFA on blood lipid and blood cell biology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: MRC Human Nutrition Research, Elsie Widdowson Laboratory, Fulbourn Road, Cambridge CB1 9NL, UK. celia.walker@mrc-hnr.cam.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are increased in plasma lipids and blood cell membranes in response to supplementation. Whilst arachidonic acid (AA) is correspondingly decreased, the effect on other fatty acids (FA) is less well described and there may be site-specific differences. In response to 12 months EPA + DHA supplementation in doses equivalent to 0-4 portions of oily fish/week (1 portion: 3.27 g EPA+DHA) multinomial regression analysis was used to identify important FA changes for plasma phosphatidylcholine (PC), cholesteryl ester (CE) and triglyceride (TAG) and for blood mononuclear cells (MNC), red blood cells (RBC) and platelets (PLAT). Dose-dependent increases in EPA + DHA were matched by decreases in several n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in PC, CE, RBC and PLAT, but were predominantly compensated for by oleic acid in TAG. Changes were observed for all FA classes in MNC. Consequently the n-6:n-3 PUFA ratio was reduced in a dose-dependent manner in all pools after 12 months (37%-64% of placebo in the four portions group). We conclude that the profile of the FA decreased in exchange for the increase in EPA + DHA following supplementation differs by FA pool with implications for understanding the impact of n-3 PUFA on blood lipid and blood cell biology.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus