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Ferulic Acid Alleviates Changes in a Rat Model of Metabolic Syndrome Induced by High-Carbohydrate, High-Fat Diet.

Senaphan K, Kukongviriyapan U, Sangartit W, Pakdeechote P, Pannangpetch P, Prachaney P, Greenwald SE, Kukongviriyapan V - Nutrients (2015)

Bottom Line: We observed that FA significantly improved insulin sensitivity and lipid profiles, and reduced elevated blood pressure, compared to untreated controls (p < 0.05).The effects of FA in HCHF-induced MS may be realized through suppression of oxidative stress by down-regulation of p47phox, increased nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability with up-regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and suppression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α).Our results suggest that supplementation of FA may have health benefits by minimizing the cardiovascular complications of MS and alleviating its symptoms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002, Thailand. ketmanee.879@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities characterized by obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension and dyslipidemia. Ferulic acid (FA) is the major phenolic compound found in rice oil and various fruits and vegetables. In this study, we examined the beneficial effects of FA in minimizing insulin resistance, vascular dysfunction and remodeling in a rat model of high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-induced metabolic changes, which is regarded as an analogue of metabolic syndrome (MS) in man. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a high carbohydrate, high fat (HCHF) diet and 15% fructose in drinking water for 16 weeks, where control rats were fed with standard chow diet and tap water. FA (30 or 60 mg/kg) was orally administered to the HCHF and control rats during the last six weeks of the study. We observed that FA significantly improved insulin sensitivity and lipid profiles, and reduced elevated blood pressure, compared to untreated controls (p < 0.05). Moreover, FA also improved vascular function and prevented vascular remodeling of mesenteric arteries. The effects of FA in HCHF-induced MS may be realized through suppression of oxidative stress by down-regulation of p47phox, increased nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability with up-regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and suppression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Our results suggest that supplementation of FA may have health benefits by minimizing the cardiovascular complications of MS and alleviating its symptoms.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effect of FA on vascular remodeling of mesenteric arteries in MS rats. Representative photomicrographs of the mesenteric arteries (×400) stained with hematoxylin and eosin are shown and morphometric analysis was performed for (A) the wall thickness; (B) media to lumen ratio (M/L); (C) cross-sectional area (CSA) of the media layer; (D) lumen area. Values are presented as mean ± standard error of the mean (SEM) (n = 6/group); *p < 0.05 vs. C + PG; #p < 0.05 vs. MS group; †p < 0.05 vs. MS with FA 30 mg/kg. FA, ferulic acid; MS, metabolic syndrome.
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nutrients-07-05283-f006: Effect of FA on vascular remodeling of mesenteric arteries in MS rats. Representative photomicrographs of the mesenteric arteries (×400) stained with hematoxylin and eosin are shown and morphometric analysis was performed for (A) the wall thickness; (B) media to lumen ratio (M/L); (C) cross-sectional area (CSA) of the media layer; (D) lumen area. Values are presented as mean ± standard error of the mean (SEM) (n = 6/group); *p < 0.05 vs. C + PG; #p < 0.05 vs. MS group; †p < 0.05 vs. MS with FA 30 mg/kg. FA, ferulic acid; MS, metabolic syndrome.

Mentions: Figure 6 illustrates the histological changes in mesenteric arteries from the various experimental groups. Vascular wall thickness, M/L ratio and CSA were significantly increased in the HCHF group. However the luminal cross sectional area remained unchanged (Figure 6D). The histological changes in the vessel medial layer were indicative of hypertrophic vascular remodeling. These results show that, chronic consumption of HCHF induced vascular remodeling and that treatment with FA (30 and 60 mg/kg) attenuated this remodeling in a dose dependent manner as indicated by significantly reduced vascular wall thickness, M/L ratio and CSA (Figure 6A–C).


Ferulic Acid Alleviates Changes in a Rat Model of Metabolic Syndrome Induced by High-Carbohydrate, High-Fat Diet.

Senaphan K, Kukongviriyapan U, Sangartit W, Pakdeechote P, Pannangpetch P, Prachaney P, Greenwald SE, Kukongviriyapan V - Nutrients (2015)

Effect of FA on vascular remodeling of mesenteric arteries in MS rats. Representative photomicrographs of the mesenteric arteries (×400) stained with hematoxylin and eosin are shown and morphometric analysis was performed for (A) the wall thickness; (B) media to lumen ratio (M/L); (C) cross-sectional area (CSA) of the media layer; (D) lumen area. Values are presented as mean ± standard error of the mean (SEM) (n = 6/group); *p < 0.05 vs. C + PG; #p < 0.05 vs. MS group; †p < 0.05 vs. MS with FA 30 mg/kg. FA, ferulic acid; MS, metabolic syndrome.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555122&req=5

nutrients-07-05283-f006: Effect of FA on vascular remodeling of mesenteric arteries in MS rats. Representative photomicrographs of the mesenteric arteries (×400) stained with hematoxylin and eosin are shown and morphometric analysis was performed for (A) the wall thickness; (B) media to lumen ratio (M/L); (C) cross-sectional area (CSA) of the media layer; (D) lumen area. Values are presented as mean ± standard error of the mean (SEM) (n = 6/group); *p < 0.05 vs. C + PG; #p < 0.05 vs. MS group; †p < 0.05 vs. MS with FA 30 mg/kg. FA, ferulic acid; MS, metabolic syndrome.
Mentions: Figure 6 illustrates the histological changes in mesenteric arteries from the various experimental groups. Vascular wall thickness, M/L ratio and CSA were significantly increased in the HCHF group. However the luminal cross sectional area remained unchanged (Figure 6D). The histological changes in the vessel medial layer were indicative of hypertrophic vascular remodeling. These results show that, chronic consumption of HCHF induced vascular remodeling and that treatment with FA (30 and 60 mg/kg) attenuated this remodeling in a dose dependent manner as indicated by significantly reduced vascular wall thickness, M/L ratio and CSA (Figure 6A–C).

Bottom Line: We observed that FA significantly improved insulin sensitivity and lipid profiles, and reduced elevated blood pressure, compared to untreated controls (p < 0.05).The effects of FA in HCHF-induced MS may be realized through suppression of oxidative stress by down-regulation of p47phox, increased nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability with up-regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and suppression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α).Our results suggest that supplementation of FA may have health benefits by minimizing the cardiovascular complications of MS and alleviating its symptoms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002, Thailand. ketmanee.879@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities characterized by obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension and dyslipidemia. Ferulic acid (FA) is the major phenolic compound found in rice oil and various fruits and vegetables. In this study, we examined the beneficial effects of FA in minimizing insulin resistance, vascular dysfunction and remodeling in a rat model of high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-induced metabolic changes, which is regarded as an analogue of metabolic syndrome (MS) in man. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a high carbohydrate, high fat (HCHF) diet and 15% fructose in drinking water for 16 weeks, where control rats were fed with standard chow diet and tap water. FA (30 or 60 mg/kg) was orally administered to the HCHF and control rats during the last six weeks of the study. We observed that FA significantly improved insulin sensitivity and lipid profiles, and reduced elevated blood pressure, compared to untreated controls (p < 0.05). Moreover, FA also improved vascular function and prevented vascular remodeling of mesenteric arteries. The effects of FA in HCHF-induced MS may be realized through suppression of oxidative stress by down-regulation of p47phox, increased nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability with up-regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and suppression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Our results suggest that supplementation of FA may have health benefits by minimizing the cardiovascular complications of MS and alleviating its symptoms.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus