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Evidence of Filamentary Switching in Oxide-based Memory Devices via Weak Programming and Retention Failure Analysis.

Younis A, Chu D, Li S - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Furthermore, the metal oxide-based (CeO2:Gd) memory device was found to possess electrical and neuromorphic multifunctionalities.In addition, a short-term to long-term memory transition analogous to the forgetting process in the human brain, which is regarded as a key biological synaptic function for information processing and data storage, was realized.Based on a careful examination of the device's retention behaviour at elevated temperatures, the filamentary nature of switching in such devices can be understood from a new perspective.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, 2052, NSW, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Further progress in high-performance microelectronic devices relies on the development of novel materials and device architectures. However, the components and designs that are currently in use have reached their physical limits. Intensive research efforts, ranging from device fabrication to performance evaluation, are required to surmount these limitations. In this paper, we demonstrate that the superior bipolar resistive switching characteristics of a CeO2:Gd-based memory device can be manipulated by means of UV radiation, serving as a new degree of freedom. Furthermore, the metal oxide-based (CeO2:Gd) memory device was found to possess electrical and neuromorphic multifunctionalities. To investigate the underlying switching mechanism of the device, its plasticity behaviour was studied by imposing weak programming conditions. In addition, a short-term to long-term memory transition analogous to the forgetting process in the human brain, which is regarded as a key biological synaptic function for information processing and data storage, was realized. Based on a careful examination of the device's retention behaviour at elevated temperatures, the filamentary nature of switching in such devices can be understood from a new perspective.

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Measurement of pulse relaxation behaviour over a certain period of time.Bursts of varying numbers of pulses (0.8 V) (a) 10 pulses, (b) 25 pulses, and (c) 45 pulses — were imposed on the memory device to induce potentiation, and the corresponding current relaxation times were measured at a low read voltage of 0.1 V. (d) The same curves re-plotted on a 30 s time scale to emphasize the short-term to long-term memory transformation.
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f4: Measurement of pulse relaxation behaviour over a certain period of time.Bursts of varying numbers of pulses (0.8 V) (a) 10 pulses, (b) 25 pulses, and (c) 45 pulses — were imposed on the memory device to induce potentiation, and the corresponding current relaxation times were measured at a low read voltage of 0.1 V. (d) The same curves re-plotted on a 30 s time scale to emphasize the short-term to long-term memory transformation.

Mentions: The phenomenon of STM corresponds to a neuronally induced synaptic weight modification that tends to relax towards a resting state, thereby giving rise to activity-dependent signal processing29. To further evaluate the plasticity behaviour of our device, continuous weak programming signals were implemented. The device was exposed to a series of pulses of fixed amplitude (0.8 V) and width (10 mS) to modulate the potentiation; this was followed by a short read voltage to examine the device relaxation behaviour, as shown in Fig. 4.


Evidence of Filamentary Switching in Oxide-based Memory Devices via Weak Programming and Retention Failure Analysis.

Younis A, Chu D, Li S - Sci Rep (2015)

Measurement of pulse relaxation behaviour over a certain period of time.Bursts of varying numbers of pulses (0.8 V) (a) 10 pulses, (b) 25 pulses, and (c) 45 pulses — were imposed on the memory device to induce potentiation, and the corresponding current relaxation times were measured at a low read voltage of 0.1 V. (d) The same curves re-plotted on a 30 s time scale to emphasize the short-term to long-term memory transformation.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555098&req=5

f4: Measurement of pulse relaxation behaviour over a certain period of time.Bursts of varying numbers of pulses (0.8 V) (a) 10 pulses, (b) 25 pulses, and (c) 45 pulses — were imposed on the memory device to induce potentiation, and the corresponding current relaxation times were measured at a low read voltage of 0.1 V. (d) The same curves re-plotted on a 30 s time scale to emphasize the short-term to long-term memory transformation.
Mentions: The phenomenon of STM corresponds to a neuronally induced synaptic weight modification that tends to relax towards a resting state, thereby giving rise to activity-dependent signal processing29. To further evaluate the plasticity behaviour of our device, continuous weak programming signals were implemented. The device was exposed to a series of pulses of fixed amplitude (0.8 V) and width (10 mS) to modulate the potentiation; this was followed by a short read voltage to examine the device relaxation behaviour, as shown in Fig. 4.

Bottom Line: Furthermore, the metal oxide-based (CeO2:Gd) memory device was found to possess electrical and neuromorphic multifunctionalities.In addition, a short-term to long-term memory transition analogous to the forgetting process in the human brain, which is regarded as a key biological synaptic function for information processing and data storage, was realized.Based on a careful examination of the device's retention behaviour at elevated temperatures, the filamentary nature of switching in such devices can be understood from a new perspective.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, 2052, NSW, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Further progress in high-performance microelectronic devices relies on the development of novel materials and device architectures. However, the components and designs that are currently in use have reached their physical limits. Intensive research efforts, ranging from device fabrication to performance evaluation, are required to surmount these limitations. In this paper, we demonstrate that the superior bipolar resistive switching characteristics of a CeO2:Gd-based memory device can be manipulated by means of UV radiation, serving as a new degree of freedom. Furthermore, the metal oxide-based (CeO2:Gd) memory device was found to possess electrical and neuromorphic multifunctionalities. To investigate the underlying switching mechanism of the device, its plasticity behaviour was studied by imposing weak programming conditions. In addition, a short-term to long-term memory transition analogous to the forgetting process in the human brain, which is regarded as a key biological synaptic function for information processing and data storage, was realized. Based on a careful examination of the device's retention behaviour at elevated temperatures, the filamentary nature of switching in such devices can be understood from a new perspective.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus