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Neuroimaging of the joint Simon effect with believed biological and non-biological co-actors.

Wen T, Hsieh S - Front Hum Neurosci (2015)

Bottom Line: Performing a task alone or together with another agent can produce different outcomes.The medial prefrontal cortex, involved thinking about the beliefs and intentions of other people, possibly reflects a social-cognitive aspect or self-other discrimination during the joint task when believing a biological co-actor is present.Our results suggest that action co-representation can occur even offline with any agent type given a priori information that they are co-acting; however, additional regions are recruited when participants believe they are task-sharing with another human.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cognitive Electrophysiology Lab: Control, Aging, Sleep, and Emotion, Department of Psychology, National Cheng Kung University Tainan, Taiwan ; Department of Life Sciences, National Cheng Kung University Tainan, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT
Performing a task alone or together with another agent can produce different outcomes. The current study used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the neural underpinnings when participants performed a Go/Nogo task alone or complementarily with another co-actor (unseen), whom was believed to be another human or a computer. During both complementary tasks, reaction time data suggested that participants integrated the potential action of their co-actor in their own action planning. Compared to the single-actor task, increased parietal and precentral activity during complementary tasks as shown in the fMRI data further suggested representation of the co-actor's response. The superior frontal gyrus of the medial prefrontal cortex was differentially activated in the human co-actor condition compared to the computer co-actor condition. The medial prefrontal cortex, involved thinking about the beliefs and intentions of other people, possibly reflects a social-cognitive aspect or self-other discrimination during the joint task when believing a biological co-actor is present. Our results suggest that action co-representation can occur even offline with any agent type given a priori information that they are co-acting; however, additional regions are recruited when participants believe they are task-sharing with another human.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Montage of transversal slicing (the numbers indicate the z coordinates) of using Nogo trials as a baseline and comparing the activity of congruent versus incongruent trials in (A) biological co-actor condition versus the single-actor No/Nogo condition; (B) computer co-actor condition versus the single-actor No/Nogo condition; and (C) biological co-actor condition versus the computer co-actor condition.
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Figure 4: Montage of transversal slicing (the numbers indicate the z coordinates) of using Nogo trials as a baseline and comparing the activity of congruent versus incongruent trials in (A) biological co-actor condition versus the single-actor No/Nogo condition; (B) computer co-actor condition versus the single-actor No/Nogo condition; and (C) biological co-actor condition versus the computer co-actor condition.

Mentions: Congruency effects were compared between the three single hand conditions (believed biological agent co-actor, computer co-actor, and single Go/Nogo task). The contrasts are shown in Figure 4 and listed in Table 3. Compared to the single-actor condition, the biological co-actor condition elicited higher activation during congruent trials in the precuneus, cuneus, inferior parietal lobule, post-central gyrus, and fusiform gyrus. Compared to the single-actor condition, the computer co-actor condition elicited higher activation during congruent trials in the precuneus, inferior parietal lobule, and lingual gyrus. The difference between the biological and computer co-actor conditions in occurred in the bilateral superior frontal gyrus, which is a part of the medial prefrontal cortex.


Neuroimaging of the joint Simon effect with believed biological and non-biological co-actors.

Wen T, Hsieh S - Front Hum Neurosci (2015)

Montage of transversal slicing (the numbers indicate the z coordinates) of using Nogo trials as a baseline and comparing the activity of congruent versus incongruent trials in (A) biological co-actor condition versus the single-actor No/Nogo condition; (B) computer co-actor condition versus the single-actor No/Nogo condition; and (C) biological co-actor condition versus the computer co-actor condition.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555067&req=5

Figure 4: Montage of transversal slicing (the numbers indicate the z coordinates) of using Nogo trials as a baseline and comparing the activity of congruent versus incongruent trials in (A) biological co-actor condition versus the single-actor No/Nogo condition; (B) computer co-actor condition versus the single-actor No/Nogo condition; and (C) biological co-actor condition versus the computer co-actor condition.
Mentions: Congruency effects were compared between the three single hand conditions (believed biological agent co-actor, computer co-actor, and single Go/Nogo task). The contrasts are shown in Figure 4 and listed in Table 3. Compared to the single-actor condition, the biological co-actor condition elicited higher activation during congruent trials in the precuneus, cuneus, inferior parietal lobule, post-central gyrus, and fusiform gyrus. Compared to the single-actor condition, the computer co-actor condition elicited higher activation during congruent trials in the precuneus, inferior parietal lobule, and lingual gyrus. The difference between the biological and computer co-actor conditions in occurred in the bilateral superior frontal gyrus, which is a part of the medial prefrontal cortex.

Bottom Line: Performing a task alone or together with another agent can produce different outcomes.The medial prefrontal cortex, involved thinking about the beliefs and intentions of other people, possibly reflects a social-cognitive aspect or self-other discrimination during the joint task when believing a biological co-actor is present.Our results suggest that action co-representation can occur even offline with any agent type given a priori information that they are co-acting; however, additional regions are recruited when participants believe they are task-sharing with another human.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cognitive Electrophysiology Lab: Control, Aging, Sleep, and Emotion, Department of Psychology, National Cheng Kung University Tainan, Taiwan ; Department of Life Sciences, National Cheng Kung University Tainan, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT
Performing a task alone or together with another agent can produce different outcomes. The current study used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the neural underpinnings when participants performed a Go/Nogo task alone or complementarily with another co-actor (unseen), whom was believed to be another human or a computer. During both complementary tasks, reaction time data suggested that participants integrated the potential action of their co-actor in their own action planning. Compared to the single-actor task, increased parietal and precentral activity during complementary tasks as shown in the fMRI data further suggested representation of the co-actor's response. The superior frontal gyrus of the medial prefrontal cortex was differentially activated in the human co-actor condition compared to the computer co-actor condition. The medial prefrontal cortex, involved thinking about the beliefs and intentions of other people, possibly reflects a social-cognitive aspect or self-other discrimination during the joint task when believing a biological co-actor is present. Our results suggest that action co-representation can occur even offline with any agent type given a priori information that they are co-acting; however, additional regions are recruited when participants believe they are task-sharing with another human.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus