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Light intensity modulation by coccoliths of Emiliania huxleyi as a micro-photo-regulator.

Mizukawa Y, Miyashita Y, Satoh M, Shiraiwa Y, Iwasaka M - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: The magnetic field effect is induced by the diamagnetic torque force directing the coccolith radial plane perpendicular to the applied magnetic fields at 400 to 500 mT.The detached coccolith scatters radially the light incident to its radial plane.The experimental results on magnetically oriented coccoliths show that an individual coccolith has a specific direction of light scattering, although the possible physiological effect of the coccolith remains for further study, focusing on the light-scattering anisotropies of coccoliths on living cells.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 739-8527, Japan.

ABSTRACT
In this study, we present experimental evidence showing that coccoliths have light-scattering anisotropy that contributes to a possible control of solar light exposure in the ocean. Changing the angle between the incident light and an applied magnetic field causes differences in the light-scattering intensities of a suspension of coccoliths isolated from Emiliania huxleyi. The magnetic field effect is induced by the diamagnetic torque force directing the coccolith radial plane perpendicular to the applied magnetic fields at 400 to 500 mT. The developed technique reveals the light-scattering anisotropies in the 3-μm-diameter floating coccoliths by orienting themselves in response to the magnetic fields. The detached coccolith scatters radially the light incident to its radial plane. The experimental results on magnetically oriented coccoliths show that an individual coccolith has a specific direction of light scattering, although the possible physiological effect of the coccolith remains for further study, focusing on the light-scattering anisotropies of coccoliths on living cells.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Fiberoptic detection of the light scattering intensity in the floating coccoliths when the average direction of the radial board orientation was affected by the applied magnetic field.A magnetic field of 400 mT was applied twice during the time-course measurement. (a) The incident light was parallel to the magnetic field. Light was collected from the direction that was perpendicular to both the incident light and the magnetic field. (b) The three vectors were orthogonal. (c) Light was collected from a direction that was parallel to the magnetic field. The incident light was perpendicular to both the detection direction and the magnetic field direction.
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f5: Fiberoptic detection of the light scattering intensity in the floating coccoliths when the average direction of the radial board orientation was affected by the applied magnetic field.A magnetic field of 400 mT was applied twice during the time-course measurement. (a) The incident light was parallel to the magnetic field. Light was collected from the direction that was perpendicular to both the incident light and the magnetic field. (b) The three vectors were orthogonal. (c) Light was collected from a direction that was parallel to the magnetic field. The incident light was perpendicular to both the detection direction and the magnetic field direction.

Mentions: By employing a fiber optic measurement, we obtained the three modes of light-scattering by coccoliths in magnetic fields (Fig. 5). To investigate the light-scattering anisotropy in coccoliths, the angles of three vectors, the incident illumination, the applied magnetic field, and the detecting axis, were varied. The three directional configurations of light-scattering patterns in Fig. 5a–c were modified and are described in a time-series graph.


Light intensity modulation by coccoliths of Emiliania huxleyi as a micro-photo-regulator.

Mizukawa Y, Miyashita Y, Satoh M, Shiraiwa Y, Iwasaka M - Sci Rep (2015)

Fiberoptic detection of the light scattering intensity in the floating coccoliths when the average direction of the radial board orientation was affected by the applied magnetic field.A magnetic field of 400 mT was applied twice during the time-course measurement. (a) The incident light was parallel to the magnetic field. Light was collected from the direction that was perpendicular to both the incident light and the magnetic field. (b) The three vectors were orthogonal. (c) Light was collected from a direction that was parallel to the magnetic field. The incident light was perpendicular to both the detection direction and the magnetic field direction.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555034&req=5

f5: Fiberoptic detection of the light scattering intensity in the floating coccoliths when the average direction of the radial board orientation was affected by the applied magnetic field.A magnetic field of 400 mT was applied twice during the time-course measurement. (a) The incident light was parallel to the magnetic field. Light was collected from the direction that was perpendicular to both the incident light and the magnetic field. (b) The three vectors were orthogonal. (c) Light was collected from a direction that was parallel to the magnetic field. The incident light was perpendicular to both the detection direction and the magnetic field direction.
Mentions: By employing a fiber optic measurement, we obtained the three modes of light-scattering by coccoliths in magnetic fields (Fig. 5). To investigate the light-scattering anisotropy in coccoliths, the angles of three vectors, the incident illumination, the applied magnetic field, and the detecting axis, were varied. The three directional configurations of light-scattering patterns in Fig. 5a–c were modified and are described in a time-series graph.

Bottom Line: The magnetic field effect is induced by the diamagnetic torque force directing the coccolith radial plane perpendicular to the applied magnetic fields at 400 to 500 mT.The detached coccolith scatters radially the light incident to its radial plane.The experimental results on magnetically oriented coccoliths show that an individual coccolith has a specific direction of light scattering, although the possible physiological effect of the coccolith remains for further study, focusing on the light-scattering anisotropies of coccoliths on living cells.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 739-8527, Japan.

ABSTRACT
In this study, we present experimental evidence showing that coccoliths have light-scattering anisotropy that contributes to a possible control of solar light exposure in the ocean. Changing the angle between the incident light and an applied magnetic field causes differences in the light-scattering intensities of a suspension of coccoliths isolated from Emiliania huxleyi. The magnetic field effect is induced by the diamagnetic torque force directing the coccolith radial plane perpendicular to the applied magnetic fields at 400 to 500 mT. The developed technique reveals the light-scattering anisotropies in the 3-μm-diameter floating coccoliths by orienting themselves in response to the magnetic fields. The detached coccolith scatters radially the light incident to its radial plane. The experimental results on magnetically oriented coccoliths show that an individual coccolith has a specific direction of light scattering, although the possible physiological effect of the coccolith remains for further study, focusing on the light-scattering anisotropies of coccoliths on living cells.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus