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Light intensity modulation by coccoliths of Emiliania huxleyi as a micro-photo-regulator.

Mizukawa Y, Miyashita Y, Satoh M, Shiraiwa Y, Iwasaka M - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: The magnetic field effect is induced by the diamagnetic torque force directing the coccolith radial plane perpendicular to the applied magnetic fields at 400 to 500 mT.The detached coccolith scatters radially the light incident to its radial plane.The experimental results on magnetically oriented coccoliths show that an individual coccolith has a specific direction of light scattering, although the possible physiological effect of the coccolith remains for further study, focusing on the light-scattering anisotropies of coccoliths on living cells.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 739-8527, Japan.

ABSTRACT
In this study, we present experimental evidence showing that coccoliths have light-scattering anisotropy that contributes to a possible control of solar light exposure in the ocean. Changing the angle between the incident light and an applied magnetic field causes differences in the light-scattering intensities of a suspension of coccoliths isolated from Emiliania huxleyi. The magnetic field effect is induced by the diamagnetic torque force directing the coccolith radial plane perpendicular to the applied magnetic fields at 400 to 500 mT. The developed technique reveals the light-scattering anisotropies in the 3-μm-diameter floating coccoliths by orienting themselves in response to the magnetic fields. The detached coccolith scatters radially the light incident to its radial plane. The experimental results on magnetically oriented coccoliths show that an individual coccolith has a specific direction of light scattering, although the possible physiological effect of the coccolith remains for further study, focusing on the light-scattering anisotropies of coccoliths on living cells.

No MeSH data available.


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Magnetic orientation of coccoliths.(a) SEM image of isolated coccoliths of Emiliania huxleyi and a model Emiliania huxleyi. Bar, 5 μm. (b) Bright field image of coccoliths in the absence of a magnetic field. Bar, 20 μm. (c) Changes in the inclination of coccoliths subjected a magnetic field of 400 mT (left-right direction).
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f1: Magnetic orientation of coccoliths.(a) SEM image of isolated coccoliths of Emiliania huxleyi and a model Emiliania huxleyi. Bar, 5 μm. (b) Bright field image of coccoliths in the absence of a magnetic field. Bar, 20 μm. (c) Changes in the inclination of coccoliths subjected a magnetic field of 400 mT (left-right direction).

Mentions: Figure 1 shows a change in the inclination of coccoliths in a magnetic field of 400 mT. In the photograph (Fig. 1c), the observed shapes of coccoliths suggest an increase in the number of coccoliths in which the direction of the radial board is perpendicular to the applied magnetic field, whereas most of the coccoliths shown in Fig. 1b are randomly oriented. The coccoliths with a diameter of 3 μm demonstrated Brownian motion when floating in water, and the thermal fluctuation at room temperature caused disorder in the coccolith orientation. However, the percent of coccoliths oriented to the same direction increased during the magnetic field exposure.


Light intensity modulation by coccoliths of Emiliania huxleyi as a micro-photo-regulator.

Mizukawa Y, Miyashita Y, Satoh M, Shiraiwa Y, Iwasaka M - Sci Rep (2015)

Magnetic orientation of coccoliths.(a) SEM image of isolated coccoliths of Emiliania huxleyi and a model Emiliania huxleyi. Bar, 5 μm. (b) Bright field image of coccoliths in the absence of a magnetic field. Bar, 20 μm. (c) Changes in the inclination of coccoliths subjected a magnetic field of 400 mT (left-right direction).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555034&req=5

f1: Magnetic orientation of coccoliths.(a) SEM image of isolated coccoliths of Emiliania huxleyi and a model Emiliania huxleyi. Bar, 5 μm. (b) Bright field image of coccoliths in the absence of a magnetic field. Bar, 20 μm. (c) Changes in the inclination of coccoliths subjected a magnetic field of 400 mT (left-right direction).
Mentions: Figure 1 shows a change in the inclination of coccoliths in a magnetic field of 400 mT. In the photograph (Fig. 1c), the observed shapes of coccoliths suggest an increase in the number of coccoliths in which the direction of the radial board is perpendicular to the applied magnetic field, whereas most of the coccoliths shown in Fig. 1b are randomly oriented. The coccoliths with a diameter of 3 μm demonstrated Brownian motion when floating in water, and the thermal fluctuation at room temperature caused disorder in the coccolith orientation. However, the percent of coccoliths oriented to the same direction increased during the magnetic field exposure.

Bottom Line: The magnetic field effect is induced by the diamagnetic torque force directing the coccolith radial plane perpendicular to the applied magnetic fields at 400 to 500 mT.The detached coccolith scatters radially the light incident to its radial plane.The experimental results on magnetically oriented coccoliths show that an individual coccolith has a specific direction of light scattering, although the possible physiological effect of the coccolith remains for further study, focusing on the light-scattering anisotropies of coccoliths on living cells.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 739-8527, Japan.

ABSTRACT
In this study, we present experimental evidence showing that coccoliths have light-scattering anisotropy that contributes to a possible control of solar light exposure in the ocean. Changing the angle between the incident light and an applied magnetic field causes differences in the light-scattering intensities of a suspension of coccoliths isolated from Emiliania huxleyi. The magnetic field effect is induced by the diamagnetic torque force directing the coccolith radial plane perpendicular to the applied magnetic fields at 400 to 500 mT. The developed technique reveals the light-scattering anisotropies in the 3-μm-diameter floating coccoliths by orienting themselves in response to the magnetic fields. The detached coccolith scatters radially the light incident to its radial plane. The experimental results on magnetically oriented coccoliths show that an individual coccolith has a specific direction of light scattering, although the possible physiological effect of the coccolith remains for further study, focusing on the light-scattering anisotropies of coccoliths on living cells.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus