Limits...
Maternal separation produces alterations of forebrain brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in differently aged rats.

Wang Q, Shao F, Wang W - Front Mol Neurosci (2015)

Bottom Line: Early life adversity, such as postnatal maternal separation (MS), play a central role in the development of psychopathologies during individual ontogeny.In this study, we investigated the effects of repeated MS (4 h per day from postnatal day (PND) 1-21) on the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and the hippocampus of male and female juvenile (PND 21), adolescent (PND 35) and young adult (PND 56) Wistar rats.The present study shows unique age-differently changes on a molecular level induced by MS and advances the use of MS as a valid animal model to detect the underlying neurobiological mechanisms of mental disorders.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Peking University Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
Early life adversity, such as postnatal maternal separation (MS), play a central role in the development of psychopathologies during individual ontogeny. In this study, we investigated the effects of repeated MS (4 h per day from postnatal day (PND) 1-21) on the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and the hippocampus of male and female juvenile (PND 21), adolescent (PND 35) and young adult (PND 56) Wistar rats. The results indicated that MS increased BDNF in the CA1 and the dentate gyrus (DG) of adolescent rats as well as in the DG of young adult rats. However, the expression of BDNF in the mPFC in the young adult rats was decreased by MS. Additionally, in the hippocampus, there was decreased BDNF expression with age in both the MS and non separated rats. However, in the mPFC, the BDNF expression was increased with age in the non separated rats; nevertheless, the BDNF expression was significantly decreased in the MS young adult rats. In the NAc, the BDNF expression was increased with age in the male non-maternal separation (NMS) rats, and the young adult female MS rats had less BDNF expression than the adolescent female MS rats. The present study shows unique age-differently changes on a molecular level induced by MS and advances the use of MS as a valid animal model to detect the underlying neurobiological mechanisms of mental disorders.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effects of MS on the BDNF expression in the mPFC, including the effects of MS on the BDNF expression at different ages (A) and representative IHC figures (B). The results are expressed as the mean ± S.E.M. (*compared with PND 56 NMS rats, p < 0.05; #compared with PND 35 NMS rats, p < 0.05; &compared with PND 21 and PND 35 MS rats, p < 0.05). Scale bar = 500 μm.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555027&req=5

Figure 2: Effects of MS on the BDNF expression in the mPFC, including the effects of MS on the BDNF expression at different ages (A) and representative IHC figures (B). The results are expressed as the mean ± S.E.M. (*compared with PND 56 NMS rats, p < 0.05; #compared with PND 35 NMS rats, p < 0.05; &compared with PND 21 and PND 35 MS rats, p < 0.05). Scale bar = 500 μm.

Mentions: The BDNF expression in the mPFC for each group was summarized in Figure 2. MS significantly decreased the BDNF expression in the mPFC (F(1,84) = 4.006, p = 0.005). The influence of age and gender on the expression of BDNF was not significant. The interaction between MS and age was significant (F(2,84) = 7.749, p = 0.001), whereas the other interactions were not significant. Further analysis (t-test) indicated that MS reduced the BDNF expression in the mPFC in the PND 56 rats (t(30) = 5.350, p < 0.001; Figure 2A). A one-way ANOVA revealed that there was a significant difference among the three ages in both the NMS and MS groups (NMS: F(2,45) = 3.238, p = 0.049; MS: F(2,45) = 4.607, p = 0.015). The post hoc (LSD) comparisons revealed that in the NMS group the PND 56 rats had significantly increased expression compared with the PND 35 rats; in the MS group the PND 56 rats had significantly less expression compared with the PND 21 and PND 35 rats (Figure 2A).


Maternal separation produces alterations of forebrain brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in differently aged rats.

Wang Q, Shao F, Wang W - Front Mol Neurosci (2015)

Effects of MS on the BDNF expression in the mPFC, including the effects of MS on the BDNF expression at different ages (A) and representative IHC figures (B). The results are expressed as the mean ± S.E.M. (*compared with PND 56 NMS rats, p < 0.05; #compared with PND 35 NMS rats, p < 0.05; &compared with PND 21 and PND 35 MS rats, p < 0.05). Scale bar = 500 μm.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555027&req=5

Figure 2: Effects of MS on the BDNF expression in the mPFC, including the effects of MS on the BDNF expression at different ages (A) and representative IHC figures (B). The results are expressed as the mean ± S.E.M. (*compared with PND 56 NMS rats, p < 0.05; #compared with PND 35 NMS rats, p < 0.05; &compared with PND 21 and PND 35 MS rats, p < 0.05). Scale bar = 500 μm.
Mentions: The BDNF expression in the mPFC for each group was summarized in Figure 2. MS significantly decreased the BDNF expression in the mPFC (F(1,84) = 4.006, p = 0.005). The influence of age and gender on the expression of BDNF was not significant. The interaction between MS and age was significant (F(2,84) = 7.749, p = 0.001), whereas the other interactions were not significant. Further analysis (t-test) indicated that MS reduced the BDNF expression in the mPFC in the PND 56 rats (t(30) = 5.350, p < 0.001; Figure 2A). A one-way ANOVA revealed that there was a significant difference among the three ages in both the NMS and MS groups (NMS: F(2,45) = 3.238, p = 0.049; MS: F(2,45) = 4.607, p = 0.015). The post hoc (LSD) comparisons revealed that in the NMS group the PND 56 rats had significantly increased expression compared with the PND 35 rats; in the MS group the PND 56 rats had significantly less expression compared with the PND 21 and PND 35 rats (Figure 2A).

Bottom Line: Early life adversity, such as postnatal maternal separation (MS), play a central role in the development of psychopathologies during individual ontogeny.In this study, we investigated the effects of repeated MS (4 h per day from postnatal day (PND) 1-21) on the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and the hippocampus of male and female juvenile (PND 21), adolescent (PND 35) and young adult (PND 56) Wistar rats.The present study shows unique age-differently changes on a molecular level induced by MS and advances the use of MS as a valid animal model to detect the underlying neurobiological mechanisms of mental disorders.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Peking University Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
Early life adversity, such as postnatal maternal separation (MS), play a central role in the development of psychopathologies during individual ontogeny. In this study, we investigated the effects of repeated MS (4 h per day from postnatal day (PND) 1-21) on the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and the hippocampus of male and female juvenile (PND 21), adolescent (PND 35) and young adult (PND 56) Wistar rats. The results indicated that MS increased BDNF in the CA1 and the dentate gyrus (DG) of adolescent rats as well as in the DG of young adult rats. However, the expression of BDNF in the mPFC in the young adult rats was decreased by MS. Additionally, in the hippocampus, there was decreased BDNF expression with age in both the MS and non separated rats. However, in the mPFC, the BDNF expression was increased with age in the non separated rats; nevertheless, the BDNF expression was significantly decreased in the MS young adult rats. In the NAc, the BDNF expression was increased with age in the male non-maternal separation (NMS) rats, and the young adult female MS rats had less BDNF expression than the adolescent female MS rats. The present study shows unique age-differently changes on a molecular level induced by MS and advances the use of MS as a valid animal model to detect the underlying neurobiological mechanisms of mental disorders.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus