Limits...
A direct-to-drive neural data acquisition system.

Kinney JP, Bernstein JG, Meyer AJ, Barber JB, Bolivar M, Newbold B, Scholvin J, Moore-Kochlacs C, Wentz CT, Kopell NJ, Boyden ES - Front Neural Circuits (2015)

Bottom Line: However, all such systems still rely on personal computers for data storage, and thus are limited by the bandwidth and cost of the computers, especially as the scale of recording increases.Here we present a novel architecture in which a digital processor receives data from an analog-to-digital converter, and writes that data directly to hard drives, without the need for a personal computer to serve as an intermediary in the DAQ process.This minimalist architecture may support exceptionally high data throughput, without incurring costs to support unnecessary hardware and overhead associated with personal computers, thus facilitating scaling of electrophysiological recording in the future.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Synthetic Neurobiology Laboratory, Media Lab and McGovern Institute, Departments of Brain and Cognitive Sciences and Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA, USA.

ABSTRACT
Driven by the increasing channel count of neural probes, there is much effort being directed to creating increasingly scalable electrophysiology data acquisition (DAQ) systems. However, all such systems still rely on personal computers for data storage, and thus are limited by the bandwidth and cost of the computers, especially as the scale of recording increases. Here we present a novel architecture in which a digital processor receives data from an analog-to-digital converter, and writes that data directly to hard drives, without the need for a personal computer to serve as an intermediary in the DAQ process. This minimalist architecture may support exceptionally high data throughput, without incurring costs to support unnecessary hardware and overhead associated with personal computers, thus facilitating scaling of electrophysiological recording in the future.

No MeSH data available.


Implementation of direct communication design of data acquisition (DAQ) module. Photograph of the acquisition module with key parts labeled. The field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-board measures 15 cm × 16 cm × 2 cm.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555017&req=5

Figure 1: Implementation of direct communication design of data acquisition (DAQ) module. Photograph of the acquisition module with key parts labeled. The field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-board measures 15 cm × 16 cm × 2 cm.

Mentions: We built a minimalist DAQ module (Figure 1) centered around an FPGA (Spartan-6 LX150T, Xilinx, Inc., San Jose, CA, USA) that acquires neural data directly from analog-to-digital converters downstream from amplifiers (“headstages”).


A direct-to-drive neural data acquisition system.

Kinney JP, Bernstein JG, Meyer AJ, Barber JB, Bolivar M, Newbold B, Scholvin J, Moore-Kochlacs C, Wentz CT, Kopell NJ, Boyden ES - Front Neural Circuits (2015)

Implementation of direct communication design of data acquisition (DAQ) module. Photograph of the acquisition module with key parts labeled. The field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-board measures 15 cm × 16 cm × 2 cm.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4555017&req=5

Figure 1: Implementation of direct communication design of data acquisition (DAQ) module. Photograph of the acquisition module with key parts labeled. The field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-board measures 15 cm × 16 cm × 2 cm.
Mentions: We built a minimalist DAQ module (Figure 1) centered around an FPGA (Spartan-6 LX150T, Xilinx, Inc., San Jose, CA, USA) that acquires neural data directly from analog-to-digital converters downstream from amplifiers (“headstages”).

Bottom Line: However, all such systems still rely on personal computers for data storage, and thus are limited by the bandwidth and cost of the computers, especially as the scale of recording increases.Here we present a novel architecture in which a digital processor receives data from an analog-to-digital converter, and writes that data directly to hard drives, without the need for a personal computer to serve as an intermediary in the DAQ process.This minimalist architecture may support exceptionally high data throughput, without incurring costs to support unnecessary hardware and overhead associated with personal computers, thus facilitating scaling of electrophysiological recording in the future.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Synthetic Neurobiology Laboratory, Media Lab and McGovern Institute, Departments of Brain and Cognitive Sciences and Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA, USA.

ABSTRACT
Driven by the increasing channel count of neural probes, there is much effort being directed to creating increasingly scalable electrophysiology data acquisition (DAQ) systems. However, all such systems still rely on personal computers for data storage, and thus are limited by the bandwidth and cost of the computers, especially as the scale of recording increases. Here we present a novel architecture in which a digital processor receives data from an analog-to-digital converter, and writes that data directly to hard drives, without the need for a personal computer to serve as an intermediary in the DAQ process. This minimalist architecture may support exceptionally high data throughput, without incurring costs to support unnecessary hardware and overhead associated with personal computers, thus facilitating scaling of electrophysiological recording in the future.

No MeSH data available.