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On the Use of a Simple Physical System Analogy to Study Robustness Features in Animal Sciences.

Sadoul B, Martin O, Prunet P, Friggens NC - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The model has proven to properly fit the different responses measured in this study and to quantitatively describe the different temporal patterns for each statistical individual in the study.It provides therefore a new way to explicitly describe, analyze and compare responses of individuals facing an acute perturbation.This study suggests that such physical models may be usefully applied to characterize robustness in many other biological systems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: INRA, LPGP Fish Physiology and Genomics UR1037, Rennes, France.

ABSTRACT
Environmental perturbations can affect the health, welfare, and fitness of animals. Being able to characterize and phenotype adaptive capacity is therefore of growing scientific concern in animal ecology and in animal production sciences. Terms borrowed from physics are commonly used to describe adaptive responses of animals facing an environmental perturbation, but no quantitative characterization of these responses has been made. Modeling the dynamic responses to an acute challenge was used in this study to facilitate the characterization of adaptive capacity and therefore robustness. A simple model based on a spring and damper was developed to simulate the dynamic responses of animals facing an acute challenge. The parameters characterizing the spring and the damper can be interpreted in terms of stiffness and resistance to the change of the system. The model was tested on physiological and behavioral responses of rainbow trout facing an acute confinement challenge. The model has proven to properly fit the different responses measured in this study and to quantitatively describe the different temporal patterns for each statistical individual in the study. It provides therefore a new way to explicitly describe, analyze and compare responses of individuals facing an acute perturbation. This study suggests that such physical models may be usefully applied to characterize robustness in many other biological systems.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Fitting the model to cortisol release rate, oxygen consumption, group activity and group dispersion in rainbow trouts facing and recovering from a confinement challenge (grey rectangle).Data (observed values ± SE) are expressed as fold changes. The model fit is shown for each measure by the solid line. Stiffness (K) and resistance to change (C) parameters of the model were fitted on the mean of the cortisol release rate (K = 0.028, C = 0.384), group activity (K = 0.143, C = 1.137), oxygen consumption (K = 0.314, C = 3.052) and the group dispersion (K = 0.542, C = 9.809) measures.
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pone.0137333.g008: Fitting the model to cortisol release rate, oxygen consumption, group activity and group dispersion in rainbow trouts facing and recovering from a confinement challenge (grey rectangle).Data (observed values ± SE) are expressed as fold changes. The model fit is shown for each measure by the solid line. Stiffness (K) and resistance to change (C) parameters of the model were fitted on the mean of the cortisol release rate (K = 0.028, C = 0.384), group activity (K = 0.143, C = 1.137), oxygen consumption (K = 0.314, C = 3.052) and the group dispersion (K = 0.542, C = 9.809) measures.

Mentions: After data preparation (see dedicated section in Materials and Methods), the mean temporal pattern for each measure was calculated and presented, as points, in Fig 8. Globally, fish subjected to a confinement challenge display an increase of cortisol release rate, oxygen consumption and group behavior (activity or dispersion). The model was adjusted to the four mean responses to evaluate its ability to fit different physiological and behavioral responses to a perturbation. The adjustments were, despite the amplitude differences, very satisfactory (continuous lines in Fig 8) with high model efficiency statistics (MEF = 0.98, 0.88, 0.90, 0.67 for the cortisol release rate, the group activity, the oxygen consumption and the group dispersion, respectively). The highest model values were obtained at the end of the confinement period. The 4 measures show very divergent amplitudes of response to the challenge, translated by contrasted K values. Cortisol release rate increased 4-fold relative to baseline values (xmax = 4.4). In contrast, group dispersion increased only 1.3 fold (xmax = 1.31). These differences in amplitude result in a stiffness 11 times (Kdisp/ Kcort) stronger for group dispersion than for cortisol (Table 1).


On the Use of a Simple Physical System Analogy to Study Robustness Features in Animal Sciences.

Sadoul B, Martin O, Prunet P, Friggens NC - PLoS ONE (2015)

Fitting the model to cortisol release rate, oxygen consumption, group activity and group dispersion in rainbow trouts facing and recovering from a confinement challenge (grey rectangle).Data (observed values ± SE) are expressed as fold changes. The model fit is shown for each measure by the solid line. Stiffness (K) and resistance to change (C) parameters of the model were fitted on the mean of the cortisol release rate (K = 0.028, C = 0.384), group activity (K = 0.143, C = 1.137), oxygen consumption (K = 0.314, C = 3.052) and the group dispersion (K = 0.542, C = 9.809) measures.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4554989&req=5

pone.0137333.g008: Fitting the model to cortisol release rate, oxygen consumption, group activity and group dispersion in rainbow trouts facing and recovering from a confinement challenge (grey rectangle).Data (observed values ± SE) are expressed as fold changes. The model fit is shown for each measure by the solid line. Stiffness (K) and resistance to change (C) parameters of the model were fitted on the mean of the cortisol release rate (K = 0.028, C = 0.384), group activity (K = 0.143, C = 1.137), oxygen consumption (K = 0.314, C = 3.052) and the group dispersion (K = 0.542, C = 9.809) measures.
Mentions: After data preparation (see dedicated section in Materials and Methods), the mean temporal pattern for each measure was calculated and presented, as points, in Fig 8. Globally, fish subjected to a confinement challenge display an increase of cortisol release rate, oxygen consumption and group behavior (activity or dispersion). The model was adjusted to the four mean responses to evaluate its ability to fit different physiological and behavioral responses to a perturbation. The adjustments were, despite the amplitude differences, very satisfactory (continuous lines in Fig 8) with high model efficiency statistics (MEF = 0.98, 0.88, 0.90, 0.67 for the cortisol release rate, the group activity, the oxygen consumption and the group dispersion, respectively). The highest model values were obtained at the end of the confinement period. The 4 measures show very divergent amplitudes of response to the challenge, translated by contrasted K values. Cortisol release rate increased 4-fold relative to baseline values (xmax = 4.4). In contrast, group dispersion increased only 1.3 fold (xmax = 1.31). These differences in amplitude result in a stiffness 11 times (Kdisp/ Kcort) stronger for group dispersion than for cortisol (Table 1).

Bottom Line: The model has proven to properly fit the different responses measured in this study and to quantitatively describe the different temporal patterns for each statistical individual in the study.It provides therefore a new way to explicitly describe, analyze and compare responses of individuals facing an acute perturbation.This study suggests that such physical models may be usefully applied to characterize robustness in many other biological systems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: INRA, LPGP Fish Physiology and Genomics UR1037, Rennes, France.

ABSTRACT
Environmental perturbations can affect the health, welfare, and fitness of animals. Being able to characterize and phenotype adaptive capacity is therefore of growing scientific concern in animal ecology and in animal production sciences. Terms borrowed from physics are commonly used to describe adaptive responses of animals facing an environmental perturbation, but no quantitative characterization of these responses has been made. Modeling the dynamic responses to an acute challenge was used in this study to facilitate the characterization of adaptive capacity and therefore robustness. A simple model based on a spring and damper was developed to simulate the dynamic responses of animals facing an acute challenge. The parameters characterizing the spring and the damper can be interpreted in terms of stiffness and resistance to the change of the system. The model was tested on physiological and behavioral responses of rainbow trout facing an acute confinement challenge. The model has proven to properly fit the different responses measured in this study and to quantitatively describe the different temporal patterns for each statistical individual in the study. It provides therefore a new way to explicitly describe, analyze and compare responses of individuals facing an acute perturbation. This study suggests that such physical models may be usefully applied to characterize robustness in many other biological systems.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus