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Role of positron emission tomography in lung cancer

View Article: PubMed Central

ABSTRACT

The ability to demonstrate tumour foci that are undetected by conventional imaging has resulted in the emergence of positron emission tomography (PET) as a valuable clinical tool in oncology. This article describes the technique and indications for fluorine-18 labelled fluorodeoxyglucose (18FDG)-PET in lung cancer, demonstrating the high accuracy and cost-effectiveness of 18FDG-PET in the characterisation of solitary pulmonary nodules and in the pre-operative staging of non-small cell lung cancer. Emerging roles in determination of prognosis, radiotherapy planning, therapy monitoring and diagnosis of recurrence are illustrated.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

An illustration of how the detection of small tumours by PET is not determined by spatial resolution. The text on the left is displayed with high spatial resolution but is unable to detect the hidden message ‘CANCER’. Even though the text on the right is blurred (low resolution), the hidden message is revealed by labelling the letters that are functionally different (i.e. they carry the hidden message).
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Fig1: An illustration of how the detection of small tumours by PET is not determined by spatial resolution. The text on the left is displayed with high spatial resolution but is unable to detect the hidden message ‘CANCER’. Even though the text on the right is blurred (low resolution), the hidden message is revealed by labelling the letters that are functionally different (i.e. they carry the hidden message).

Mentions: 18FDG demonstrates high uptake in many cancers, including lung cancer. Uptake results from increased expression of hexokinase and of Glut-1 glucose transporters on the cell surface. Both of these metabolic changes result from oncogene mutations with the tumour cells, most notably the p53 gene-mutation, which occurs commonly in lung cancer. It is important to realise that the detection of a tumour focus on 18FDG-PET is determined by the degree of metabolic change rather than the size of the lesion (Fig. 1). The high glucose metabolic rate of tumours as compared to normal tissues allows tumour foci as small as 3 mm to be commonly identified by PET.Figure 1


Role of positron emission tomography in lung cancer
An illustration of how the detection of small tumours by PET is not determined by spatial resolution. The text on the left is displayed with high spatial resolution but is unable to detect the hidden message ‘CANCER’. Even though the text on the right is blurred (low resolution), the hidden message is revealed by labelling the letters that are functionally different (i.e. they carry the hidden message).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4554689&req=5

Fig1: An illustration of how the detection of small tumours by PET is not determined by spatial resolution. The text on the left is displayed with high spatial resolution but is unable to detect the hidden message ‘CANCER’. Even though the text on the right is blurred (low resolution), the hidden message is revealed by labelling the letters that are functionally different (i.e. they carry the hidden message).
Mentions: 18FDG demonstrates high uptake in many cancers, including lung cancer. Uptake results from increased expression of hexokinase and of Glut-1 glucose transporters on the cell surface. Both of these metabolic changes result from oncogene mutations with the tumour cells, most notably the p53 gene-mutation, which occurs commonly in lung cancer. It is important to realise that the detection of a tumour focus on 18FDG-PET is determined by the degree of metabolic change rather than the size of the lesion (Fig. 1). The high glucose metabolic rate of tumours as compared to normal tissues allows tumour foci as small as 3 mm to be commonly identified by PET.Figure 1

View Article: PubMed Central

ABSTRACT

The ability to demonstrate tumour foci that are undetected by conventional imaging has resulted in the emergence of positron emission tomography (PET) as a valuable clinical tool in oncology. This article describes the technique and indications for fluorine-18 labelled fluorodeoxyglucose (18FDG)-PET in lung cancer, demonstrating the high accuracy and cost-effectiveness of 18FDG-PET in the characterisation of solitary pulmonary nodules and in the pre-operative staging of non-small cell lung cancer. Emerging roles in determination of prognosis, radiotherapy planning, therapy monitoring and diagnosis of recurrence are illustrated.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus