Limits...
Membrane biofilm development improves COD removal in anaerobic membrane bioreactor wastewater treatment.

Smith AL, Skerlos SJ, Raskin L - Microb Biotechnol (2015)

Bottom Line: High membrane fouling significantly improved permeate quality, but resulted in dissolved methane in the permeate at a concentration two to three times the equilibrium concentration predicted by Henry's law.Restoring fouled membranes to a transmembrane pressure (TMP) near zero by increasing biogas sparging did not disrupt the biofilm's treatment performance, suggesting that microbes in the foulant layer were tightly adhered and did not significantly contribute to TMP.The results describe an attractive operational strategy to improve treatment performance in low-temperature AnMBR by supporting syntrophy and methanogenesis in the membrane biofilm through controlled membrane fouling.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Michigan, 2350 Hayward Road, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA.

No MeSH data available.


Average transmembrane pressure (TMP) for each of the membranes P1, P2 and P3 (left y-axis) and bioreactor hydraulic retention time (HRT; right y-axis) from days 0 to 172. This time period is divided in four phases defined by the degree of membrane fouling or biofilm development. Data from days 139 to 153 are not reported due to poor AnMBR performance. Error bars for HRT represent the standard deviation of daily flow rate measurements. Error bars for TMP represent the standard deviation of pressure data recorded every minute of operation.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4554476&req=5

fig01: Average transmembrane pressure (TMP) for each of the membranes P1, P2 and P3 (left y-axis) and bioreactor hydraulic retention time (HRT; right y-axis) from days 0 to 172. This time period is divided in four phases defined by the degree of membrane fouling or biofilm development. Data from days 139 to 153 are not reported due to poor AnMBR performance. Error bars for HRT represent the standard deviation of daily flow rate measurements. Error bars for TMP represent the standard deviation of pressure data recorded every minute of operation.

Mentions: The AnMBR with three membrane housings was initially operated for 99 days (Phase 1; Fig. 1) under low fouling (LF) conditions by maintaining a high biogas sparging flow rate to prevent biofilm development for each of the membrane units. COD removal during the first 99 days of operation (Phase 1) was limited, averaging 57% ± 12% (Fig. S1). The majority of the permeate chemical oxygen demand (COD) was comprised of acetate (average 70 ± 19 mg l−1) and propionate (average 52 ± 18 mg l−1) (Fig. S2). Further information regarding start-up is presented in Appendix S6.


Membrane biofilm development improves COD removal in anaerobic membrane bioreactor wastewater treatment.

Smith AL, Skerlos SJ, Raskin L - Microb Biotechnol (2015)

Average transmembrane pressure (TMP) for each of the membranes P1, P2 and P3 (left y-axis) and bioreactor hydraulic retention time (HRT; right y-axis) from days 0 to 172. This time period is divided in four phases defined by the degree of membrane fouling or biofilm development. Data from days 139 to 153 are not reported due to poor AnMBR performance. Error bars for HRT represent the standard deviation of daily flow rate measurements. Error bars for TMP represent the standard deviation of pressure data recorded every minute of operation.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4554476&req=5

fig01: Average transmembrane pressure (TMP) for each of the membranes P1, P2 and P3 (left y-axis) and bioreactor hydraulic retention time (HRT; right y-axis) from days 0 to 172. This time period is divided in four phases defined by the degree of membrane fouling or biofilm development. Data from days 139 to 153 are not reported due to poor AnMBR performance. Error bars for HRT represent the standard deviation of daily flow rate measurements. Error bars for TMP represent the standard deviation of pressure data recorded every minute of operation.
Mentions: The AnMBR with three membrane housings was initially operated for 99 days (Phase 1; Fig. 1) under low fouling (LF) conditions by maintaining a high biogas sparging flow rate to prevent biofilm development for each of the membrane units. COD removal during the first 99 days of operation (Phase 1) was limited, averaging 57% ± 12% (Fig. S1). The majority of the permeate chemical oxygen demand (COD) was comprised of acetate (average 70 ± 19 mg l−1) and propionate (average 52 ± 18 mg l−1) (Fig. S2). Further information regarding start-up is presented in Appendix S6.

Bottom Line: High membrane fouling significantly improved permeate quality, but resulted in dissolved methane in the permeate at a concentration two to three times the equilibrium concentration predicted by Henry's law.Restoring fouled membranes to a transmembrane pressure (TMP) near zero by increasing biogas sparging did not disrupt the biofilm's treatment performance, suggesting that microbes in the foulant layer were tightly adhered and did not significantly contribute to TMP.The results describe an attractive operational strategy to improve treatment performance in low-temperature AnMBR by supporting syntrophy and methanogenesis in the membrane biofilm through controlled membrane fouling.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Michigan, 2350 Hayward Road, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA.

No MeSH data available.