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Comparative genomics of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strains B301D and HS191 and insights into intrapathovar traits associated with plant pathogenesis.

Ravindran A, Jalan N, Yuan JS, Wang N, Gross DC - Microbiologyopen (2015)

Bottom Line: Differences are observed in the type III effector composition for the three strains that likely influences host range.The HS191 genome had the largest number at 25 of effector genes, and seven effector genes are specific to this monocot strain.Toxin production is another major trait associated with virulence of P. syringae pv. syringae, and HS191 is distinguished by genes for production of syringopeptin SP25 and mangotoxin.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, 77843-2132.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparison of the region in strain HS191 carrying the mbo operon (mboA to mboF) responsible for mangotoxin production with the corresponding regions in strains B728a and B301D (blue arrows indicate predicted location) that do not produce mangotoxin and lack the mbo operon. Colors indicate ortholog groups and the size of the bar approximately corresponds to gene size. This comparison was done using JGI-IMG/ER (https://img.jgi.doe.gov/cgi-bin/w/main.cgi).
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fig06: Comparison of the region in strain HS191 carrying the mbo operon (mboA to mboF) responsible for mangotoxin production with the corresponding regions in strains B728a and B301D (blue arrows indicate predicted location) that do not produce mangotoxin and lack the mbo operon. Colors indicate ortholog groups and the size of the bar approximately corresponds to gene size. This comparison was done using JGI-IMG/ER (https://img.jgi.doe.gov/cgi-bin/w/main.cgi).

Mentions: Mangotoxin is an antimetabolite toxin that is distributed within specific genomospecies 1 populations of P. syringae and was first associated with strains from diseased mango trees (Gutiérrez-Barranquero et al. 2013). Mangotoxin is a potent inhibitor of ornithine N-acetyl-transferase in the arginine biosynthesis pathway and thereby contributes significantly to virulence in host plants (Carrión et al. 2012, 2013). The mangotoxin biosynthesis apparatus is composed of a cluster of six mbo genes arranged in a 5.8 kb operon. It was reported that strain B728a is not a producer of mangotoxin and did not harbor the mbo operon (Carrión et al. 2012). Likewise, the B301D genome does not carry the mbo operon and thereby cannot produce mangotoxin (Fig.6). The HS191 genome, however, carries the full complement of mangotoxin biosynthesis genes. The draft sequences of the five monocot strains shown in Figure1 that are phylogenetically related to HS191 all carry the intact mbo operon. Accordingly, it is postulated that the monocot strains of pathovar syringae represent a distinct phylogroup that is distinguished by the ability to produce both syringopeptin SP25 and mangotoxin.


Comparative genomics of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strains B301D and HS191 and insights into intrapathovar traits associated with plant pathogenesis.

Ravindran A, Jalan N, Yuan JS, Wang N, Gross DC - Microbiologyopen (2015)

Comparison of the region in strain HS191 carrying the mbo operon (mboA to mboF) responsible for mangotoxin production with the corresponding regions in strains B728a and B301D (blue arrows indicate predicted location) that do not produce mangotoxin and lack the mbo operon. Colors indicate ortholog groups and the size of the bar approximately corresponds to gene size. This comparison was done using JGI-IMG/ER (https://img.jgi.doe.gov/cgi-bin/w/main.cgi).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4554452&req=5

fig06: Comparison of the region in strain HS191 carrying the mbo operon (mboA to mboF) responsible for mangotoxin production with the corresponding regions in strains B728a and B301D (blue arrows indicate predicted location) that do not produce mangotoxin and lack the mbo operon. Colors indicate ortholog groups and the size of the bar approximately corresponds to gene size. This comparison was done using JGI-IMG/ER (https://img.jgi.doe.gov/cgi-bin/w/main.cgi).
Mentions: Mangotoxin is an antimetabolite toxin that is distributed within specific genomospecies 1 populations of P. syringae and was first associated with strains from diseased mango trees (Gutiérrez-Barranquero et al. 2013). Mangotoxin is a potent inhibitor of ornithine N-acetyl-transferase in the arginine biosynthesis pathway and thereby contributes significantly to virulence in host plants (Carrión et al. 2012, 2013). The mangotoxin biosynthesis apparatus is composed of a cluster of six mbo genes arranged in a 5.8 kb operon. It was reported that strain B728a is not a producer of mangotoxin and did not harbor the mbo operon (Carrión et al. 2012). Likewise, the B301D genome does not carry the mbo operon and thereby cannot produce mangotoxin (Fig.6). The HS191 genome, however, carries the full complement of mangotoxin biosynthesis genes. The draft sequences of the five monocot strains shown in Figure1 that are phylogenetically related to HS191 all carry the intact mbo operon. Accordingly, it is postulated that the monocot strains of pathovar syringae represent a distinct phylogroup that is distinguished by the ability to produce both syringopeptin SP25 and mangotoxin.

Bottom Line: Differences are observed in the type III effector composition for the three strains that likely influences host range.The HS191 genome had the largest number at 25 of effector genes, and seven effector genes are specific to this monocot strain.Toxin production is another major trait associated with virulence of P. syringae pv. syringae, and HS191 is distinguished by genes for production of syringopeptin SP25 and mangotoxin.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, 77843-2132.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus