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Ultraviolet light and laser irradiation enhances the antibacterial activity of glucosamine-functionalized gold nanoparticles.

Govindaraju S, Ramasamy M, Baskaran R, Ahn SJ, Yun K - Int J Nanomedicine (2015)

Bottom Line: Laser-irradiated GlcN-AuNPs exhibited significant bactericidal activity against E. coli.Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopic analysis supported the cell death mechanism in the presence of GlcN-AuNP-treated bacteria.The overall results of this study suggest that the prepared nanoparticles have potential as a potent antibacterial agent for the treatment of a wide range of disease-causing bacteria.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Bionanotechnology, Gachon University, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea ; Centre for Advanced Instrumentation, Korea Research Institute of Standard and Science, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
Here we report a novel method for the synthesis of glucosamine-functionalized gold nanoparticles (GlcN-AuNPs) using biocompatible and biodegradable glucosamine for antibacterial activity. GlcN-AuNPs were prepared using different concentrations of glucosamine. The synthesized AuNPs were characterized for surface plasmon resonance, surface morphology, fluorescence spectroscopy, and antibacterial activity. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the AuNPs, GlcN-AuNPs, and GlcN-AuNPs when irradiated by ultraviolet light and laser were investigated and compared with the MIC of standard kanamycin using Escherichia coli by the microdilution method. Laser-irradiated GlcN-AuNPs exhibited significant bactericidal activity against E. coli. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopic analysis supported the cell death mechanism in the presence of GlcN-AuNP-treated bacteria. Further, morphological changes in E. coli after laser treatment were investigated using atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The overall results of this study suggest that the prepared nanoparticles have potential as a potent antibacterial agent for the treatment of a wide range of disease-causing bacteria.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

SEM images of AuNPs.Notes: Scanning electron micrographs of AuNPs without glucosamine (A) and AuNPs functionalized with different concentrations of glucosamine, ie, (B) (F1) 0.021% w/v, (C) (F2) 0.043% w/v, (D) (F3) 0.086% w/v, and (E) (F4) 0.12% w/v of GlcN concentration.Abbreviations: AuNPs, gold nanoparticles; F, formulation; GlcN, glucosamine.
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f4-ijn-10-067: SEM images of AuNPs.Notes: Scanning electron micrographs of AuNPs without glucosamine (A) and AuNPs functionalized with different concentrations of glucosamine, ie, (B) (F1) 0.021% w/v, (C) (F2) 0.043% w/v, (D) (F3) 0.086% w/v, and (E) (F4) 0.12% w/v of GlcN concentration.Abbreviations: AuNPs, gold nanoparticles; F, formulation; GlcN, glucosamine.

Mentions: The morphology of the AuNPs and GlcN-AuNPs was characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy, AFM, and transmission electron microscopy, and all the formulations were found to have a spherical shape.23 The charge rendered is insufficient in AuNPs, leading to sensitization of the particles causing aggregation. The scanning electron micrographs provided in Figure 4 that show some aggregated AuNPs. However, higher concentrations of glucosamine conferred sufficient charge, rendering the nanoparticles electrostatically stable and preventing interaction between them. Figure 5 shows the two-dimensional and three-dimensional AFM images of AuNPs and GlcN-AuNPs. The two-dimensional images show individual spherical particles in both formulations and the three-dimensional images show the height of the nanoparticle formulations, which was maximal for the AuNPs, reflecting the hefty particles present in AuNPs, which the GlcN-AuNPs were present discrete particles. Figure 6 shows the same results on AFM, further confirming the TEM findings. In particular, a coating of glucosamine can be seen on the outside of the nanoparticles. Figure 6D shows that nanoparticles approximately 1.8 nm in height are coated with glucosamine.


Ultraviolet light and laser irradiation enhances the antibacterial activity of glucosamine-functionalized gold nanoparticles.

Govindaraju S, Ramasamy M, Baskaran R, Ahn SJ, Yun K - Int J Nanomedicine (2015)

SEM images of AuNPs.Notes: Scanning electron micrographs of AuNPs without glucosamine (A) and AuNPs functionalized with different concentrations of glucosamine, ie, (B) (F1) 0.021% w/v, (C) (F2) 0.043% w/v, (D) (F3) 0.086% w/v, and (E) (F4) 0.12% w/v of GlcN concentration.Abbreviations: AuNPs, gold nanoparticles; F, formulation; GlcN, glucosamine.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4554421&req=5

f4-ijn-10-067: SEM images of AuNPs.Notes: Scanning electron micrographs of AuNPs without glucosamine (A) and AuNPs functionalized with different concentrations of glucosamine, ie, (B) (F1) 0.021% w/v, (C) (F2) 0.043% w/v, (D) (F3) 0.086% w/v, and (E) (F4) 0.12% w/v of GlcN concentration.Abbreviations: AuNPs, gold nanoparticles; F, formulation; GlcN, glucosamine.
Mentions: The morphology of the AuNPs and GlcN-AuNPs was characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy, AFM, and transmission electron microscopy, and all the formulations were found to have a spherical shape.23 The charge rendered is insufficient in AuNPs, leading to sensitization of the particles causing aggregation. The scanning electron micrographs provided in Figure 4 that show some aggregated AuNPs. However, higher concentrations of glucosamine conferred sufficient charge, rendering the nanoparticles electrostatically stable and preventing interaction between them. Figure 5 shows the two-dimensional and three-dimensional AFM images of AuNPs and GlcN-AuNPs. The two-dimensional images show individual spherical particles in both formulations and the three-dimensional images show the height of the nanoparticle formulations, which was maximal for the AuNPs, reflecting the hefty particles present in AuNPs, which the GlcN-AuNPs were present discrete particles. Figure 6 shows the same results on AFM, further confirming the TEM findings. In particular, a coating of glucosamine can be seen on the outside of the nanoparticles. Figure 6D shows that nanoparticles approximately 1.8 nm in height are coated with glucosamine.

Bottom Line: Laser-irradiated GlcN-AuNPs exhibited significant bactericidal activity against E. coli.Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopic analysis supported the cell death mechanism in the presence of GlcN-AuNP-treated bacteria.The overall results of this study suggest that the prepared nanoparticles have potential as a potent antibacterial agent for the treatment of a wide range of disease-causing bacteria.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Bionanotechnology, Gachon University, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea ; Centre for Advanced Instrumentation, Korea Research Institute of Standard and Science, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
Here we report a novel method for the synthesis of glucosamine-functionalized gold nanoparticles (GlcN-AuNPs) using biocompatible and biodegradable glucosamine for antibacterial activity. GlcN-AuNPs were prepared using different concentrations of glucosamine. The synthesized AuNPs were characterized for surface plasmon resonance, surface morphology, fluorescence spectroscopy, and antibacterial activity. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the AuNPs, GlcN-AuNPs, and GlcN-AuNPs when irradiated by ultraviolet light and laser were investigated and compared with the MIC of standard kanamycin using Escherichia coli by the microdilution method. Laser-irradiated GlcN-AuNPs exhibited significant bactericidal activity against E. coli. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopic analysis supported the cell death mechanism in the presence of GlcN-AuNP-treated bacteria. Further, morphological changes in E. coli after laser treatment were investigated using atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The overall results of this study suggest that the prepared nanoparticles have potential as a potent antibacterial agent for the treatment of a wide range of disease-causing bacteria.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus