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Utilization of maternal health care services in post-conflict Nepal.

Bhandari TR, Sarma PS, Kutty VR - Int J Womens Health (2015)

Bottom Line: Despite a decade-long armed conflict in Nepal, the country made progress in reducing maternal mortality and is on its way to achieve the Millennium Development Goal Five.First, we compared the utilization of maternal health care services of 2006 with that of 2011.However, the increasing proportion of the utilization was higher after the Comprehensive Peace Process Agreement 2006.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Achutha Menon Centre for Health Science Studies, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Trivandrum, Kerala, India.

ABSTRACT

Background: Despite a decade-long armed conflict in Nepal, the country made progress in reducing maternal mortality and is on its way to achieve the Millennium Development Goal Five. This study aimed to assess the degree of the utilization of maternal health care services during and after the armed conflict in Nepal.

Methods: This study is based on Nepal Demographic and Health Survey data 2006 and 2011. The units of analysis were women who had given birth to at least one child in the past 5 years preceding the survey. First, we compared the utilization of maternal health care services of 2006 with that of 2011. Second, we merged the two data sets and applied logistic regression to distinguish whether the utilization of maternal health care services had improved after the peace process 2006 was underway.

Results: In 2011, 85% of the women sought antenatal care at least once. Skilled health workers for delivery care assisted 36.1% of the women, and 46% of the women attended postnatal care visit at least once. These figures were 70%, 18.7%, and 16%, respectively, in 2006. Similarly, women were more likely to utilize antenatal care at least once (odds ratio [OR] =2.18, confidence interval [CI] =1.95-2.43), skilled care at birth (OR =2.58, CI =2.36-2.81), and postnatal care at least once (OR =4.13, CI =3.75-4.50) in 2011.

Conclusion: The utilization of maternal health care services tended to increase continuously during both the armed conflict and the post-conflict period in Nepal. However, the increasing proportion of the utilization was higher after the Comprehensive Peace Process Agreement 2006.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Maternal health care service utilization status in Nepal in percentage with comparisons between the years 2006 and 2011 region-wise.Abbreviations: ECWD, Eastern-Central-Western Development; FMWD, Far-Mid-Western Development.
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f1-ijwh-7-783: Maternal health care service utilization status in Nepal in percentage with comparisons between the years 2006 and 2011 region-wise.Abbreviations: ECWD, Eastern-Central-Western Development; FMWD, Far-Mid-Western Development.

Mentions: The NDHS 2011 showed that nearly 85% of the women who were interviewed sought at least one antenatal care during their most recent pregnancy in the past 5 years preceding the survey. A total of 62% of the women received care from skilled providers, ie, doctors, nurses, and auxiliary nurse midwives, and more than 20% of the women received care from general health workers, not trained particularly in pregnancy care. Nearly 60% of the women started antenatal care in the first trimester and visited health facilities four or more times for their antenatal care. These figures were considerably less in 2006 when 70% of the women sought antenatal care at least once during their most recent pregnancy in the past 5 years preceding the survey. In 2006, not more than 50% of the women received care from skilled providers like doctors, nurses, and midwives, and nearly 25% of the women received such care from general health workers. Almost 40% of the women started antenatal care in the first trimester and visited health facilities four or more times. The utilization proportion of antenatal care varied among the strata such as development and ecological regions, residence locations, and socioeconomic and demographic characteristics of women (Table 1). The increased proportion of the utilization of antenatal care service at least once is higher in the Far-Mid-Western Development (FMWD) Region than in the Eastern-Central-Western Development (ECWD) Region (Figure 1). Women were more likely to get antenatal care at least once (odds ratio [OR] =2.18, confidence interval [CI] =1.95–2.43) in 2011 (Table 2).


Utilization of maternal health care services in post-conflict Nepal.

Bhandari TR, Sarma PS, Kutty VR - Int J Womens Health (2015)

Maternal health care service utilization status in Nepal in percentage with comparisons between the years 2006 and 2011 region-wise.Abbreviations: ECWD, Eastern-Central-Western Development; FMWD, Far-Mid-Western Development.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4554403&req=5

f1-ijwh-7-783: Maternal health care service utilization status in Nepal in percentage with comparisons between the years 2006 and 2011 region-wise.Abbreviations: ECWD, Eastern-Central-Western Development; FMWD, Far-Mid-Western Development.
Mentions: The NDHS 2011 showed that nearly 85% of the women who were interviewed sought at least one antenatal care during their most recent pregnancy in the past 5 years preceding the survey. A total of 62% of the women received care from skilled providers, ie, doctors, nurses, and auxiliary nurse midwives, and more than 20% of the women received care from general health workers, not trained particularly in pregnancy care. Nearly 60% of the women started antenatal care in the first trimester and visited health facilities four or more times for their antenatal care. These figures were considerably less in 2006 when 70% of the women sought antenatal care at least once during their most recent pregnancy in the past 5 years preceding the survey. In 2006, not more than 50% of the women received care from skilled providers like doctors, nurses, and midwives, and nearly 25% of the women received such care from general health workers. Almost 40% of the women started antenatal care in the first trimester and visited health facilities four or more times. The utilization proportion of antenatal care varied among the strata such as development and ecological regions, residence locations, and socioeconomic and demographic characteristics of women (Table 1). The increased proportion of the utilization of antenatal care service at least once is higher in the Far-Mid-Western Development (FMWD) Region than in the Eastern-Central-Western Development (ECWD) Region (Figure 1). Women were more likely to get antenatal care at least once (odds ratio [OR] =2.18, confidence interval [CI] =1.95–2.43) in 2011 (Table 2).

Bottom Line: Despite a decade-long armed conflict in Nepal, the country made progress in reducing maternal mortality and is on its way to achieve the Millennium Development Goal Five.First, we compared the utilization of maternal health care services of 2006 with that of 2011.However, the increasing proportion of the utilization was higher after the Comprehensive Peace Process Agreement 2006.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Achutha Menon Centre for Health Science Studies, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Trivandrum, Kerala, India.

ABSTRACT

Background: Despite a decade-long armed conflict in Nepal, the country made progress in reducing maternal mortality and is on its way to achieve the Millennium Development Goal Five. This study aimed to assess the degree of the utilization of maternal health care services during and after the armed conflict in Nepal.

Methods: This study is based on Nepal Demographic and Health Survey data 2006 and 2011. The units of analysis were women who had given birth to at least one child in the past 5 years preceding the survey. First, we compared the utilization of maternal health care services of 2006 with that of 2011. Second, we merged the two data sets and applied logistic regression to distinguish whether the utilization of maternal health care services had improved after the peace process 2006 was underway.

Results: In 2011, 85% of the women sought antenatal care at least once. Skilled health workers for delivery care assisted 36.1% of the women, and 46% of the women attended postnatal care visit at least once. These figures were 70%, 18.7%, and 16%, respectively, in 2006. Similarly, women were more likely to utilize antenatal care at least once (odds ratio [OR] =2.18, confidence interval [CI] =1.95-2.43), skilled care at birth (OR =2.58, CI =2.36-2.81), and postnatal care at least once (OR =4.13, CI =3.75-4.50) in 2011.

Conclusion: The utilization of maternal health care services tended to increase continuously during both the armed conflict and the post-conflict period in Nepal. However, the increasing proportion of the utilization was higher after the Comprehensive Peace Process Agreement 2006.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus