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Virus-induced secondary bacterial infection: a concise review.

Hendaus MA, Jomha FA, Alhammadi AH - Ther Clin Risk Manag (2015)

Bottom Line: Health care providers often face a dilemma when encountering a febrile infant or child with respiratory tract infection.In addition, we discuss the pathophysiology and prevention modes of the virus-bacterium coexistence.This review should provide clinicians with a comprehensive idea of the range of bacterial and viral coinfections or secondary infections that could present with viral respiratory illness.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, Academic General Pediatrics Division, Weill-Cornell Medical College, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.

ABSTRACT
Respiratory diseases are a very common source of morbidity and mortality among children. Health care providers often face a dilemma when encountering a febrile infant or child with respiratory tract infection. The reason expressed by many clinicians is the trouble to confirm whether the fever is caused by a virus or a bacterium. The aim of this review is to update the current evidence on the virus-induced bacterial infection. We present several clinical as well in vitro studies that support the correlation between virus and secondary bacterial infections. In addition, we discuss the pathophysiology and prevention modes of the virus-bacterium coexistence. A search of the PubMed and MEDLINE databases was carried out for published articles covering bacterial infections associated with respiratory viruses. This review should provide clinicians with a comprehensive idea of the range of bacterial and viral coinfections or secondary infections that could present with viral respiratory illness.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Airway epithelium.Abbreviations: INF, interferon; TJ, tight junction; TLR, Toll-like receptor; ICAM-1, intercellular adhesion molecule 1.
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f2-tcrm-11-1265: Airway epithelium.Abbreviations: INF, interferon; TJ, tight junction; TLR, Toll-like receptor; ICAM-1, intercellular adhesion molecule 1.

Mentions: The epithelium (Figure 2) is usually covered by a layer of mucus that functions as a boundary.16 Mucins, which are charged glycoproteins, are the main components of mucus.17,18 MUC5AC and MUC5B are the most common mucins in the human sputum, and they assist the innate immune system through their anti-inflammatory and antiviral properties.19,20 In addition, they facilitate trapping and clearance of viruses; however, overproduction of those mucins might have a paradoxical effect.18,19


Virus-induced secondary bacterial infection: a concise review.

Hendaus MA, Jomha FA, Alhammadi AH - Ther Clin Risk Manag (2015)

Airway epithelium.Abbreviations: INF, interferon; TJ, tight junction; TLR, Toll-like receptor; ICAM-1, intercellular adhesion molecule 1.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4554399&req=5

f2-tcrm-11-1265: Airway epithelium.Abbreviations: INF, interferon; TJ, tight junction; TLR, Toll-like receptor; ICAM-1, intercellular adhesion molecule 1.
Mentions: The epithelium (Figure 2) is usually covered by a layer of mucus that functions as a boundary.16 Mucins, which are charged glycoproteins, are the main components of mucus.17,18 MUC5AC and MUC5B are the most common mucins in the human sputum, and they assist the innate immune system through their anti-inflammatory and antiviral properties.19,20 In addition, they facilitate trapping and clearance of viruses; however, overproduction of those mucins might have a paradoxical effect.18,19

Bottom Line: Health care providers often face a dilemma when encountering a febrile infant or child with respiratory tract infection.In addition, we discuss the pathophysiology and prevention modes of the virus-bacterium coexistence.This review should provide clinicians with a comprehensive idea of the range of bacterial and viral coinfections or secondary infections that could present with viral respiratory illness.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, Academic General Pediatrics Division, Weill-Cornell Medical College, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar.

ABSTRACT
Respiratory diseases are a very common source of morbidity and mortality among children. Health care providers often face a dilemma when encountering a febrile infant or child with respiratory tract infection. The reason expressed by many clinicians is the trouble to confirm whether the fever is caused by a virus or a bacterium. The aim of this review is to update the current evidence on the virus-induced bacterial infection. We present several clinical as well in vitro studies that support the correlation between virus and secondary bacterial infections. In addition, we discuss the pathophysiology and prevention modes of the virus-bacterium coexistence. A search of the PubMed and MEDLINE databases was carried out for published articles covering bacterial infections associated with respiratory viruses. This review should provide clinicians with a comprehensive idea of the range of bacterial and viral coinfections or secondary infections that could present with viral respiratory illness.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus