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Enucleation after Embolization of Liver Failure-Causing Giant Liver Hemangioma.

Sharma A, Kaspar M, Siddiqui M, Kim J - Am J Case Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: While typically benign, these tumors can occasionally grow to sufficient size to cause a number of symptoms, including pain, severe hepatic dysfunction, or, rarely, consumptive coagulopathy.In such instances, surgical treatment may be warranted.Early referral to experienced surgical centers before the onset of dire complications such as severe hepatic dysfunction and liver failure is recommended.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Transplantation Surgery, Hume-Lee Transplant Center, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Hepatic hemangioma is a congenital tumor of the mesenchymal tissues of the liver. While typically benign, these tumors can occasionally grow to sufficient size to cause a number of symptoms, including pain, severe hepatic dysfunction, or, rarely, consumptive coagulopathy. In such instances, surgical treatment may be warranted.

Case report: We present a case of a symptomatic giant hepatic hemangioma in an elderly patient who presented with impending liver failure. She was successfully treated with a combination of surgical enucleation and liver resection after preoperative arterial embolization. We also provide a brief discussion of current treatment options for giant hepatic hemangiomas.

Conclusions: Early referral to experienced surgical centers before the onset of dire complications such as severe hepatic dysfunction and liver failure is recommended.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Magnetic resonance imaging of the abdomen showing the cranio-caudal extent of the massive cavernous hemangioma.
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f2-amjcaserep-16-563: Magnetic resonance imaging of the abdomen showing the cranio-caudal extent of the massive cavernous hemangioma.

Mentions: MRI of the abdomen (Figure 2) confirmed the presence of multiple masses in the liver with low T1 and high T2 attenuation, consistent with a diagnosis of massive hepatic hemangioma extending into the pelvis. Due to the patient’s advanced age, multiple medical co-morbidities, coagulopathy, and massive size of the tumor, hospice care at an outside hospital had been suggested. A transplant surgery opinion was sought by the consulting hepatologist at our center. A lengthy discussion was held with the patient and her family regarding risks and possible complications of surgical intervention. The patient decided against palliative care and consented to a high-risk surgical intervention.


Enucleation after Embolization of Liver Failure-Causing Giant Liver Hemangioma.

Sharma A, Kaspar M, Siddiqui M, Kim J - Am J Case Rep (2015)

Magnetic resonance imaging of the abdomen showing the cranio-caudal extent of the massive cavernous hemangioma.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4554336&req=5

f2-amjcaserep-16-563: Magnetic resonance imaging of the abdomen showing the cranio-caudal extent of the massive cavernous hemangioma.
Mentions: MRI of the abdomen (Figure 2) confirmed the presence of multiple masses in the liver with low T1 and high T2 attenuation, consistent with a diagnosis of massive hepatic hemangioma extending into the pelvis. Due to the patient’s advanced age, multiple medical co-morbidities, coagulopathy, and massive size of the tumor, hospice care at an outside hospital had been suggested. A transplant surgery opinion was sought by the consulting hepatologist at our center. A lengthy discussion was held with the patient and her family regarding risks and possible complications of surgical intervention. The patient decided against palliative care and consented to a high-risk surgical intervention.

Bottom Line: While typically benign, these tumors can occasionally grow to sufficient size to cause a number of symptoms, including pain, severe hepatic dysfunction, or, rarely, consumptive coagulopathy.In such instances, surgical treatment may be warranted.Early referral to experienced surgical centers before the onset of dire complications such as severe hepatic dysfunction and liver failure is recommended.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Transplantation Surgery, Hume-Lee Transplant Center, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Hepatic hemangioma is a congenital tumor of the mesenchymal tissues of the liver. While typically benign, these tumors can occasionally grow to sufficient size to cause a number of symptoms, including pain, severe hepatic dysfunction, or, rarely, consumptive coagulopathy. In such instances, surgical treatment may be warranted.

Case report: We present a case of a symptomatic giant hepatic hemangioma in an elderly patient who presented with impending liver failure. She was successfully treated with a combination of surgical enucleation and liver resection after preoperative arterial embolization. We also provide a brief discussion of current treatment options for giant hepatic hemangiomas.

Conclusions: Early referral to experienced surgical centers before the onset of dire complications such as severe hepatic dysfunction and liver failure is recommended.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus