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Enucleation after Embolization of Liver Failure-Causing Giant Liver Hemangioma.

Sharma A, Kaspar M, Siddiqui M, Kim J - Am J Case Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: While typically benign, these tumors can occasionally grow to sufficient size to cause a number of symptoms, including pain, severe hepatic dysfunction, or, rarely, consumptive coagulopathy.In such instances, surgical treatment may be warranted.Early referral to experienced surgical centers before the onset of dire complications such as severe hepatic dysfunction and liver failure is recommended.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Transplantation Surgery, Hume-Lee Transplant Center, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Hepatic hemangioma is a congenital tumor of the mesenchymal tissues of the liver. While typically benign, these tumors can occasionally grow to sufficient size to cause a number of symptoms, including pain, severe hepatic dysfunction, or, rarely, consumptive coagulopathy. In such instances, surgical treatment may be warranted.

Case report: We present a case of a symptomatic giant hepatic hemangioma in an elderly patient who presented with impending liver failure. She was successfully treated with a combination of surgical enucleation and liver resection after preoperative arterial embolization. We also provide a brief discussion of current treatment options for giant hepatic hemangiomas.

Conclusions: Early referral to experienced surgical centers before the onset of dire complications such as severe hepatic dysfunction and liver failure is recommended.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Computed tomography of the abdomen with large left lobe mass with compression of the right lobe.
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f1-amjcaserep-16-563: Computed tomography of the abdomen with large left lobe mass with compression of the right lobe.

Mentions: Laboratory evaluation revealed elevated liver enzymes (AST 840 U/L, ALT 515 U/L), hyperbilirubinemia (total bilirubin 14.5 md/dL, conjugated bilirubin 12.2 mg/dL), and coagulopathy (INR 3.1). Selected laboratory values are shown in Table 1. Computerized tomography of the abdomen showed multiple hypo-attenuating masses with peripheral nodular enhancement throughout the liver, suggestive of hemangiomas (Figure 1). The largest was located in the left hepatic lobe and measured 26.0×18.0×27.0 cm, with 2 other hemangiomas in the right lobe measuring 7.0×6.0 and 3.0×3.0 cm. The centers of these masses contained some hypodense areas, consistent with possible necrosis. There were no specific areas of biliary ductal dilation.


Enucleation after Embolization of Liver Failure-Causing Giant Liver Hemangioma.

Sharma A, Kaspar M, Siddiqui M, Kim J - Am J Case Rep (2015)

Computed tomography of the abdomen with large left lobe mass with compression of the right lobe.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4554336&req=5

f1-amjcaserep-16-563: Computed tomography of the abdomen with large left lobe mass with compression of the right lobe.
Mentions: Laboratory evaluation revealed elevated liver enzymes (AST 840 U/L, ALT 515 U/L), hyperbilirubinemia (total bilirubin 14.5 md/dL, conjugated bilirubin 12.2 mg/dL), and coagulopathy (INR 3.1). Selected laboratory values are shown in Table 1. Computerized tomography of the abdomen showed multiple hypo-attenuating masses with peripheral nodular enhancement throughout the liver, suggestive of hemangiomas (Figure 1). The largest was located in the left hepatic lobe and measured 26.0×18.0×27.0 cm, with 2 other hemangiomas in the right lobe measuring 7.0×6.0 and 3.0×3.0 cm. The centers of these masses contained some hypodense areas, consistent with possible necrosis. There were no specific areas of biliary ductal dilation.

Bottom Line: While typically benign, these tumors can occasionally grow to sufficient size to cause a number of symptoms, including pain, severe hepatic dysfunction, or, rarely, consumptive coagulopathy.In such instances, surgical treatment may be warranted.Early referral to experienced surgical centers before the onset of dire complications such as severe hepatic dysfunction and liver failure is recommended.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Transplantation Surgery, Hume-Lee Transplant Center, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Hepatic hemangioma is a congenital tumor of the mesenchymal tissues of the liver. While typically benign, these tumors can occasionally grow to sufficient size to cause a number of symptoms, including pain, severe hepatic dysfunction, or, rarely, consumptive coagulopathy. In such instances, surgical treatment may be warranted.

Case report: We present a case of a symptomatic giant hepatic hemangioma in an elderly patient who presented with impending liver failure. She was successfully treated with a combination of surgical enucleation and liver resection after preoperative arterial embolization. We also provide a brief discussion of current treatment options for giant hepatic hemangiomas.

Conclusions: Early referral to experienced surgical centers before the onset of dire complications such as severe hepatic dysfunction and liver failure is recommended.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus