Limits...
Built Environment Associations with Adiposity Parameters among Overweight and Obese Hispanic Youth.

Hsieh S, Klassen AC, Curriero FC, Caulfield LE, Cheskin LJ, Davis JN, Goran MI, Weigensberg MJ, Spruijt-Metz D - Prev Med Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Parallel models were built for BMI z-score, and waist circumference.Significant associations were found between percent body fat and supermarket access for boys, and percent body fat and increased park space and decreased neighborhood linguistic isolation for girls.Park access, food environment, and neighborhood socio-cultural characteristics are independent contributors to body fat in children, and the contribution of these risks differs by gender.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health, Behavior and Society, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 624 N. Broadway Street, 3 Floor, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to establish neighborhood built environment correlates of adiposity as measured by dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). The utility and methodological gains of using this measure for built environment research was further investigated by comparing model fit across parallel models on BMI z-scores and waist circumference.

Methods: Pre-existing data collected from 2001-2001 on 576 overweight and obese Hispanic youth were compiled with built environment data, and 2000 Census data for analyses conducted in 2012. Walking-distance buffers were built around participants' residential locations. Variables for park space, food access, walkability, and neighborhood socio-cultural aspects were entered into a multivariate regression model predicting percent body fat. Parallel models were built for BMI z-score, and waist circumference.

Results: Significant associations were found between percent body fat and supermarket access for boys, and percent body fat and increased park space and decreased neighborhood linguistic isolation for girls. Neighborhood socio-cultural characteristics accounted for more variance in obesity compared to BMI z-score or waist circumference.

Conclusion: Park access, food environment, and neighborhood socio-cultural characteristics are independent contributors to body fat in children, and the contribution of these risks differs by gender. There are incremental gains to using a more accurate measure of body fat in built environment obesity studies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Distribution of participant locations (N = 576) across Los Angeles County.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4554331&req=5

f0010: Distribution of participant locations (N = 576) across Los Angeles County.

Mentions: Fig. 2 depicts the geographic distribution of study participants across LA County by percent Hispanic population. Study participants were most concentrated in the East LA and in Northeast LA County. Table 1 contains univariate descriptors for study participants, neighborhood built environment, and socio-cultural characteristics. Significant differences in the relationship between neighborhood environment and body fat were found by sex. Therefore, all data presented are stratified by sex. Ages ranged from eight to eighteen. Mean %BF was 36% for males and 40% for females. For both sexes, participants lived in neighborhoods with an average of one supermarket within two miles. BMIZ contained the least variability of the three adiposity measures, having the smallest standard deviation relative to the mean value (males: mean = 2.13, sd = 0.45; females: mean = 2.02, sd = 0.41) while WC contained the most variability (males: mean = 94.83, sd = 16.56; females: mean = 91.75, sd = 15.58).


Built Environment Associations with Adiposity Parameters among Overweight and Obese Hispanic Youth.

Hsieh S, Klassen AC, Curriero FC, Caulfield LE, Cheskin LJ, Davis JN, Goran MI, Weigensberg MJ, Spruijt-Metz D - Prev Med Rep (2015)

Distribution of participant locations (N = 576) across Los Angeles County.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4554331&req=5

f0010: Distribution of participant locations (N = 576) across Los Angeles County.
Mentions: Fig. 2 depicts the geographic distribution of study participants across LA County by percent Hispanic population. Study participants were most concentrated in the East LA and in Northeast LA County. Table 1 contains univariate descriptors for study participants, neighborhood built environment, and socio-cultural characteristics. Significant differences in the relationship between neighborhood environment and body fat were found by sex. Therefore, all data presented are stratified by sex. Ages ranged from eight to eighteen. Mean %BF was 36% for males and 40% for females. For both sexes, participants lived in neighborhoods with an average of one supermarket within two miles. BMIZ contained the least variability of the three adiposity measures, having the smallest standard deviation relative to the mean value (males: mean = 2.13, sd = 0.45; females: mean = 2.02, sd = 0.41) while WC contained the most variability (males: mean = 94.83, sd = 16.56; females: mean = 91.75, sd = 15.58).

Bottom Line: Parallel models were built for BMI z-score, and waist circumference.Significant associations were found between percent body fat and supermarket access for boys, and percent body fat and increased park space and decreased neighborhood linguistic isolation for girls.Park access, food environment, and neighborhood socio-cultural characteristics are independent contributors to body fat in children, and the contribution of these risks differs by gender.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health, Behavior and Society, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 624 N. Broadway Street, 3 Floor, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to establish neighborhood built environment correlates of adiposity as measured by dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). The utility and methodological gains of using this measure for built environment research was further investigated by comparing model fit across parallel models on BMI z-scores and waist circumference.

Methods: Pre-existing data collected from 2001-2001 on 576 overweight and obese Hispanic youth were compiled with built environment data, and 2000 Census data for analyses conducted in 2012. Walking-distance buffers were built around participants' residential locations. Variables for park space, food access, walkability, and neighborhood socio-cultural aspects were entered into a multivariate regression model predicting percent body fat. Parallel models were built for BMI z-score, and waist circumference.

Results: Significant associations were found between percent body fat and supermarket access for boys, and percent body fat and increased park space and decreased neighborhood linguistic isolation for girls. Neighborhood socio-cultural characteristics accounted for more variance in obesity compared to BMI z-score or waist circumference.

Conclusion: Park access, food environment, and neighborhood socio-cultural characteristics are independent contributors to body fat in children, and the contribution of these risks differs by gender. There are incremental gains to using a more accurate measure of body fat in built environment obesity studies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus