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Bilateral inverted and impacted maxillary third molars: A case report.

Abu-Mostafa N, Barakat A, Al-Turkmani T, Al-Yousef A - J Clin Exp Dent (2015)

Bottom Line: Both were asymptomatic and pathology free clinically and radiographically.Moreover, it contains a high risk of displacement of the inverted third molar into the maxillary sinus.Conservative management was the choice, with the patient's agreement, and the inverted third molars were left in situ.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: BDS. MSc. Lecturer in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Riyadh Colleges of Dentistry and Pharmacy, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Diagnostic Science Department, Dental Hospital (Munessya) Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

ABSTRACT
Bilateral inverted third molar impaction is an extremely rare condition. We reported the case of a 50-year-old female patient with bilateral inverted and impacted maxillary third molars. Both were asymptomatic and pathology free clinically and radiographically. Surgical extraction of these inverted third molars with inaccessible positions requires an aggressive bone removal on the tuberosity bilaterally. Moreover, it contains a high risk of displacement of the inverted third molar into the maxillary sinus. Conservative management was the choice, with the patient's agreement, and the inverted third molars were left in situ. Key words:Bilateral inverted, maxillary third molar, upper impacted tooth.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The left inverted upper third molar.
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Figure 3: The left inverted upper third molar.

Mentions: A 50-year-old female patient presented to the institute’s dental hospital complaining of pain and mobility in the lower anterior teeth. The patient’s medical history included a resected malignant tumor in the intestine followed by chemotherapy, which had ended one year ago. Intraoral examination revealed mobility and deep caries on the lower incisors, defective restorations on the lower canines, and bilateral missing lower posterior teeth. In the maxilla, there was a defective upper fixed partial denture exten-ding from the right canine to the left second premolar in addition to a missing right first molar, left first molar, and left second molar. A dental panoramic radiograph and peri-apical films showed multiple recurrent caries on the abutments of the restorations, bone resorption, and peri-apical radiolucencies on the lower anterior teeth. The most interesting aspect was the presence of bilateral impacted maxillary third molars, which were inverted and distally directed (Fig. 1). Both were asymptomatic and pathology free clinically and radiographically. The crown of the right inverted third molar was very close to the maxillary sinus (Fig. 2). On the left side, the upper second molar existed between the inverted third molar and the sinus (Fig. 3).


Bilateral inverted and impacted maxillary third molars: A case report.

Abu-Mostafa N, Barakat A, Al-Turkmani T, Al-Yousef A - J Clin Exp Dent (2015)

The left inverted upper third molar.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4554248&req=5

Figure 3: The left inverted upper third molar.
Mentions: A 50-year-old female patient presented to the institute’s dental hospital complaining of pain and mobility in the lower anterior teeth. The patient’s medical history included a resected malignant tumor in the intestine followed by chemotherapy, which had ended one year ago. Intraoral examination revealed mobility and deep caries on the lower incisors, defective restorations on the lower canines, and bilateral missing lower posterior teeth. In the maxilla, there was a defective upper fixed partial denture exten-ding from the right canine to the left second premolar in addition to a missing right first molar, left first molar, and left second molar. A dental panoramic radiograph and peri-apical films showed multiple recurrent caries on the abutments of the restorations, bone resorption, and peri-apical radiolucencies on the lower anterior teeth. The most interesting aspect was the presence of bilateral impacted maxillary third molars, which were inverted and distally directed (Fig. 1). Both were asymptomatic and pathology free clinically and radiographically. The crown of the right inverted third molar was very close to the maxillary sinus (Fig. 2). On the left side, the upper second molar existed between the inverted third molar and the sinus (Fig. 3).

Bottom Line: Both were asymptomatic and pathology free clinically and radiographically.Moreover, it contains a high risk of displacement of the inverted third molar into the maxillary sinus.Conservative management was the choice, with the patient's agreement, and the inverted third molars were left in situ.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: BDS. MSc. Lecturer in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Riyadh Colleges of Dentistry and Pharmacy, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Diagnostic Science Department, Dental Hospital (Munessya) Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

ABSTRACT
Bilateral inverted third molar impaction is an extremely rare condition. We reported the case of a 50-year-old female patient with bilateral inverted and impacted maxillary third molars. Both were asymptomatic and pathology free clinically and radiographically. Surgical extraction of these inverted third molars with inaccessible positions requires an aggressive bone removal on the tuberosity bilaterally. Moreover, it contains a high risk of displacement of the inverted third molar into the maxillary sinus. Conservative management was the choice, with the patient's agreement, and the inverted third molars were left in situ. Key words:Bilateral inverted, maxillary third molar, upper impacted tooth.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus